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Town of Wilmington 



Massachusetts 




Jn iMemoriam 



Philip B. Buzzell 
Fenton P. Cogar, Jr. 

M. Alice Doucette 
Thomas McGuinness 

Harold E. Melzar 



Index 



Title Page 

Accepted Streets 66 

Beautif ication Committee 65 

Board of Appeals 21 

Board of Assessors 10 

Board of Health 61 

Board of Registrars 16 

Board of Selectmen 2 

Boards, Committees & Commissions 7 

Carter (Sarah D.J.) Lecture Fund 65 

Cemetery Department 36 

Conservation Commission 39 

Constable 59 

Council on Aging 49 

Directory of Officials 6 

Dog Officer 11 

Fire Department 30 

Highway Department 18 

Historical Commission 60 

Housing Authority 47 

Inspector of Buildings 20 

Librarian 41 

Library Trustees 40 

Planning Board 44 

Police Department 31 

Public Buildings Department 46 

Recreation Commission 51 

Redevelopment Authority 50 

Revenue Sharing 123 

School Committee 71 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 86 

Shawsheen Valley Technical School 82 

Superintendent of Schools 74 

Town Accountant 120 

Town Clerk 14 

Town Collector 13 

Town Counsel 55 

Town Engineer 17 

Town Manager 4 

Town Meetings & Elections Annual Town Meeting - March 4, 1978 87 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting - March 11, 1978 89 

State Primary - September 19, 1978 109 

State Election - November 7, 1978 112 

Special Town Meeting - December 18, 1978 117 

Town Treasurer 12 

Tree Department 19 

Vandalism Committee 45 

Veterans Agent 48 

Water & Sewer Department 37 



1 



Town of Wilmington 
Massachusetts 



BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



To the Citizens of Wilmington: 

During the past year we were very fortunate to have many citizen committees, both 
official and non-official, to assist us in guiding the direction of the Town of 
Wilmington. Several newly formed groups, such as, the Vandalism Committee, Athletic- 
Recreation Committee, additional parent Advisory Committees and other neighborhood 
groups have been instrumental in providing insight into the Town's problems and their 
possible solutions. 

We would like to thank all those who have helped the people of Wilmington by donat- 
ing their time and energies; in the classrooms of our schools, in the service of 
Boy Scouts, Girl Scouts, youth sports programs and other similar activities, in the 
aid of our senior citizens, veterans, and civic associations, and in the thankless 
task of participating on Town committees. All these people, in their own special 
way, make Wilmington a dynamic town for all its residents. 

During 1978 there were numerous events which deserve special recognition. The follow- 
ing are some of the highlights which we would like to acknowledge. 

The great Blizzard of "78" belted the Town with several feet of snow. The Highway 
Department did an outstanding job in the snow removal. In fact, the driving ban did 
not need to be imposed for any great length of time because of their extensive ef- 
forts of snow removal. 

The memory of Fred F. Cain was honored this year by the completion of the Fred F. Cain 
Rte. 129 Bridge and the dedication of Rotary Park in his honor. 

The annual Town Meeting approved and appropriated the funds necessary for a water 
treatment plant off Butters Row to alleviate the rusty water problem in that area. 
The plant is currently in the design stage. 

Town Meeting also approved and appropriated the funds to build a new eight-lane all- 
weather track at the High School. This track is now completed, and it is an excel- 
lent track and field facility for the School and Recreation Departments. 

The first two sections of the Town's interceptor sewer system, from Eames Street 
along the B&M tracks to Shawsheen Avenue, were completed during this year. 

The Wilmington Regional Health Center on Salem Street was opened this fall. It 
provides our community with the latest in modern health care on a 24-hour basis. 



2 



The 1978 property tax rate was reduced by $1.00, from $80 to $79 per $1,000 valuation. 
This was achieved through a vigorous budget review and a conservative approach to the 
expenditure of public funds, as well as, additional income from the Commonwealth. 

Finally, the quality of life in Wilmington is steadily improving as characterized by 
the number of citizens enjoying our recreational and educational activities, the 
music and other programs at the gazebo, and the high voter turnout at the November 
elections . 

It is on the eve of our 250th year of incorporation that we, the Board of Selectmen, 
thank all of you for helping to make Wilmington an excellent community in which to 
live and work. It is with your continued support we endeavor to keep our Town an 
outstanding community now and in the future. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Aldo A. Caira, Chairman 
James F . Banda 
Robert J. Cain 
Rocco V. DePasquale 
A. John Imbimbo 




Blizzard of '79 



3 




Town of Wilmington 

MASSACHUSETTS 01887 



OFFICE OF THE 
TOWN MANAGER 



AREA CODE 6(7 
6SS-33II 



To the Honorable Board of Selectmen and Citizens of Wilmington: 

As I reflect upon the year 1978 just past, the greatest single accomplishment of our government was the hold- 
ing of the tax rate over the previous year and also a slight reduction in the rate as well, assisted by a 
last-minute allocation of State funds. It should be noted that the cost in tax dollars applicable to the 
general tax rate, excluding the school tax, actually decreased from $30.14 to $28.04 per thousand dollars of 
valuation. 



It is not possible to predict from year to year what the income from state and federal sources might be. 0n< 
item of which we are aware is that the Town will no longer be receiving any income from the federal governmei 
under the so-called Anti-Recession Fiscal Aid Program because it was discontinued in 1978. It provided the 
sum of $101,000.00 in 1978 to help pay for the cost of street lights and snow removal. Also, there has been 
a substantial reduction in income derived from the CETA program and very few local unemployed residents will 
be provided jobs under this program in the future. 

Our greatest local concern today is centered around the inflation issue, or perhaps better stated, the loss i 
buying power of the dollar. Individuals and government units are equally affected. I will attempt to ratio- 
nalize in this report the reasons for the increase in the cost for services and expenditures by selecting sou 
items with which we are all familiar, and show in statistical form the percentage of gain over a ten-year 
period. As you can see, these quantitative changes are very significant as they relate to added governmental 
cost : 

Percentage 



ITEM 

(1) Town Employees: 

Schools (Full-time) 
(Part-time) 
General Government (Full-time) 
(Part-time) 

(2) Net Tax Rate: 

Schools 

General Government 

(3) Cost of Living Index 

(4) General Insurance Cost 

(5) Health Insurance Cost 

(6) Tax Exemptions (by Law) 

(7) Population 

(8) Assessed Valuation 

(9) Assessments: 

County Tax 
MBTA Tax 
Recreation Tax 



1968-9 



315 
59 
160 

2 



22.63 
18.36 



105 
50,742 
42,000 
60,000 
16,600 
$ 111,860,000 



$ 79,521 
$ 4,892 
$ 9,205 



1978-9 



416 
93 
203 
3 



50.96 
28.04 



202 
227,700 
440,000 
203,000 
18,270 
$ 157,500,000 



$ 283,657 
$ 238,000 
$ 92,909 



Gain 



32 % 
57 % 
26 % 



125 % 
53 % 

92 % 

349 % 

947 % 

238 % 

10 % 

41 % 



256 % 
4766 % 
909 % 



4 



ITEM 



1968-9 



1978-9 



Percentage 
Gain 



Library: 
Books 

Circulation 
Reference Questions 



30,000 
89,390 
890 



72,574 
129,828 
6,006 



142 % 
45 % 
574 % 



Police Department: 
Arrests 

Auto Accidents 
Domestic Problems 
Juvenile Complaints 



369 
476 
362 
506 



1,012 
995 
1,301 
1,601 



174 % 
109 % 
259 % 
216 % 



Fire Department: 
Fire Alarms 
Ambulance Calls 



471 
373 



794 
753 



68 % 
101 % 



Council on Aging: 

No. Visits to Drop-in Center 15,216 

No. Seniors using Mini-bus 5,677 

No. Lunches for Shut-ins 6,725 

No. Lunches at School 4,650 



Highway Department: 

Cost of Gasoline (per gal.) 
Asphalt (per gal.) 
Patching Material (per ton) 
Salt (per ton) 



22.21 cts. 
19.6 cts. 

6.00 
16.00 



53.46 cts. 
61.81 cts. 
14.75 
25.00 



141 % 
215 % 
145 % 
56 % 



Public Buildings Department: 
School Buildings Maintenance 
No. 2 Fuel (per gal.) 
Total Fuel Cost 
Toilet Paper (per case) 
Plywood (per sheet) 
Tennis Courts 



$ 353,934 



$ 1,143,462 



11 cts. 
38,000 
2.95 
11.50 
6 



43 cts. 
180,000 
6.98 
23.00 
21 



223 % 
291 % 
374 % 
137 % 
100 % 
250 % 



These general statistics are certainly an indicator of what changes have occurred over the past ten years to 
force the cost of providing municipal services up_ and to force the value of the dollar down . Our citizens, 
however, are still in need of a place to live, a place to raise children, and a place to work. People are 
still very much dependent upon their local government for police protection, fire protection, for public 
health administration, for waste disposal, snow removal, for street repairs and lighting, recreational activ- 
ities, for educational opportunities, for the whole range of services taken almost for granted in our complex 
society and in our neighborly Town. Quite frankly, I see no reverse in this trend of the devaluation of the 
dollar; and therefore, the need for more dollars to produce municipal services will continue for some time in 
the future. 



I wish to acknowledge that the progress which has been made over the past year is due to the leadership pro- 
vided by the Board of Selectmen, and the services have been of high quality due to the professional attitude 
of our department heads and hard work by our employees. 

The Town of Wilmington will benefit most of all by your presence at the Town Meeting. 

Respectfully submitted, 




Town Manager 



5 



DIRECTORY OF OFFICIALS - January 1, 1978 - 1979 



Board of Selectmen 



Aldo A. Caira, Chairman 
James F. Banda 
Robert J. Cain 
Rocco V. DePasquale 
A. John Imbimbo 



Term 
Expires 
1981 
1980 
1979 
1981 
1980 



Town Manager 



Sterling C. Morris 



Moderator 



John M. Callan 



Annually 



School Committee 



Lester F. White, Chairman 
James D. Tighe, Vice Chairman 
John Brooks, Secretary 
James A. Demos 
Philip Fenton 
Linda McMenimen 



1980 
1981 
1980 
1979 
1979 
1979 



Superintendent of Schools 



Dr. Walter H. Pierce 



Finance Committee 



Joyce K. Brisbois, Chairman 
John C. Clark, Vice Chairman 
David K. Cronin, Secretary 
Anita Backman 
Thomas E. Casey 
Richard D. Duggan 
Walter Kaminski 
Arthur F. Spear, Jr. 



1980 
1979 
1980 
1979 
1980 
1981 
1981 
1981 




BOARDS, COMMITTEES AND COMMISSIONS - JANUARY 1, 1978 - 1979 



APPEALS, BOARD OF 

Bruce MacDonald, Chairman 

William A. Caperci 

George C. Robertie 

Neil L. Buckley, Associate 

Joseph McMenimen, Associate 

Dorothy Robbins, Associate 

ASSESSORS, BOARD OF 

Anthony E. Krzeminski, Principal 

Charles P. Lawrenson 

Roy P. McClanahan 

BEAUTIFICATION COMMITTEE 
Paula O'Brien, Chairman 
Evelyn S. Burke 
Joseph J. Cuoco 
Cynthia White 
Hugo Wiberg 

CARTER LECTURE FUND COMMITTEE 
Madelon C. Slater, Chairman 
Frankline E. Allen 
Julia Fielding 
Mildred E. Neilson 
Kenneth Wilson 



1980 
1979 
1981 
1979 
1979 
1979 



1979 
1979 
1980 
1980 
1981 



COUNCIL ON AGING (continued) 
Nema Miller 
James Shine 
Irving Storms 

HEALTH, BOARD OF 

Thomas W. Morris, Chairman 

James J . Durkee 

Joseph A. Paglia 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 
Frank Curley, Chairman 
Foster B. Balser 
Herbert Fielding 
Ruth Harding 
Evelyn Kaminski 
William G. Meyers 
Melinda Murphy 

HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Barbara H. Larson, Chairman 

Lorraine Brozyna 

George W. Hooper 

Kevin J. McMillan 

Melvin F. Keough 

(Rep. of State Housing Board) 



1979 
1980 
1979 



1979 
1980 
1981 



1980 
1981 
1980 
1981 
1981 
1979 
1979 



1981 
1982 
1983 
1980 
1983 



250 Anniversary Committee 

Robert S. Boyce 

Robert A. Brown 

Fructuoso Carrasco 

David B. Hill 

George Hooper 

Charles Kelley 

Joan Maga 

Paula O'Brien 

Adele C. Passmore 



INDUSTRIAL DEVELOPMENT COMMISSION 
Lionel M. Baldwin 

LIBRARY TRUSTEES 

E. Hayward Bliss, Chairman 

Shirley F. Callan 

Bruce F. Conant 

John S . McNaughton 

Evelyn M. Norton 

Esther L. Russell 



1979 



1979 
1981 
1979 
1980 
1980 
1981 



CEMETERY COMMISSION 

Mildred M. Cavanaugh, Chairman 

Willis C. Lyford 

William H. Russell 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 
Chester A. Bruce, Chairman 
Jacqueline D. Allaman 
Thomas J. McGinley 
Bruce A. Peters 
Paul A. Rose 
Joan Sadowski 
Donald H. Ugolini 

COUNCIL ON AGING 

Lorraine Brozyna, Chairman 

Arthur J. Daniels, Vice Chairman 

Josephine M. Kelley, Secretary 

Stephen J. Brennick, Treasurer 

Gladys A. Babine 

Arthur Bernard 

Rose M. Gatta 

Sheldon Maga 



1979 
1981 
1980 



1979 
1981 
1980 
1980 
1979 
1980 
1981 



1979 
1980 
1981 
1979 
1981 
1980 
1980 
1980 



PERMANENT BUILDING COMMITTEE 
Albert K. Blackburn, Jr. 
Joseph J. Hartka 
David A. Holbrook 
Arthur R. Smith, Jr. 
Edward E. Thompson 

PERSONNEL ADVISORY BOARD 
Richard V. Barry 
John F. Burke 
Richard K. Hayden 

PLANNING BOARD 

Walter P. Kenney, Chairman 

John DeRoy 

William G. Hooper, Jr. 
Louis A. Maglio 
Kenneth J. Miller 

RECREATION COMMISSION 

Paul J. Bova, Chairman 

John P. Cushing, Vice Chairman 

Lorraine M. Hanna 

Larry Noel 

Francis Sferrazza 



1979 
1979 
1981 
1981 
1980 



1983 
1980 
1979 
1982 
1981 



1980 
1979 
1981 
1980 
1979 





REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY 

Raymond A. McNamara, Chairman 1981 

Harold J. Allen, Jr. 1983 

Carl A. Backman 1979 

Wilson J. Belbin 1982 

Currie N. Johnson (State Member) 1979 

REGIONAL VOCATIONAL TECHNICAL SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
Lawrence P. Flaherty 1980 
Frank H. McLean 1979 

REGISTRARS, BOARD OF 

Mary G. Condrey, Chairman 1980 
Robert L. Cavanaugh 1979 
Olin M. London 1981 
Priscilla R. Ward, Clerk 

TOWN FOREST COMMITTEE 
Kenneth C. Motschman 
Robert P. Palmer 
Frank H. Tuttle 

TRUSTEES OF TRUST FUNDS 

Arnold C. Blake, Chairman 1980 

Rachel M. Burns 1981 

Elizabeth R. Fosgate 1982 

WATER AND SEWER COMMISSIONERS 

George R. Allan, Chairman 1981 
Arthur R. Smith, Jr. 1979 



Precinct 4 
William H. Russell, Warden 
Sarah H. Cosman, Dep. Warden 
Elizabeth Cavanaugh, Clerk 
Mary O'Rourke, Dep. Clerk 
Doris V. Russell, Inspector 
Marjorie C. Kennedy, Dep. Inspector 
Mary J. Johnson, Inspector 
Edith Cuoco, Dep. Inspector 

Precinct 5 
Jean LeFavour, Warden 
Dora C. Ardolino, Dep. Warden 
Margaret Blonigan, Clerk 
Janice L. Rudnicki, Dep. Clerk 
Elizabeth Blaisdell, Inspector 
Mary T. Ward, Deputy Inspector 
Edith L. Poloian, Inspector 
Ruth S. Coursey, Dep. Inspector 

Precinct 6 
Margaret L. Perry, Warden 
Nancy J. Tarricone, Dep. Warden 
Barbara M. Cook, Clerk 
Nancy C. DeWilde, Dep. Clerk 
Diane J. Ryan, Inspector 
Patricia D. McNaughton, Dep. Inspector 
Jean F. Howard, Inspector 
Elizabeth Andrews, Dep. Inspector 



Annually 



WILMINGTON ELECTIONS OFFICERS 

Precinct 1 
Mary D'Eon, Warden 
Helen F. Sencabaugh, Dep. Warden 
Joan M. Lanzillo, Clerk 
Sandra S. Volpe, Dept. Clerk 
Clarice J. Ross, Inspector 
Alta Lyons, Dep. Inspector 
Edith Ann Graham, Inspector 
Jane A. Hill, Dep. Inspector 



Annually 



Precinct 2 
Phyllis M. O'Leary, Warden 
Charlotte Stewart, Dep. Warden 
Evelyn S. Burke, Clerk 
Marjorie MacDonald, Dep. Clerk 
Miriam H. Colucci, Inspector 
Lorita B. Bower, Dep. Inspector 
Eleanor Doyle, Inspector 
Henrietta I. Bonnell, Dep. Inspector 



Precinct 3 
Stanley Webber, Warden 
Basil L. Weatherbee, Dep. Warden 
Loretta R. Caira, Clerk 
Alice G. Marcy, Dep. Clerk 
Mary E. Woods, Inspector 
Norinne M. Markey, Dep. Inspector 
Florence A. Balkus, Inspector 
Barbara J. Buck, Dep. Inspector 



OFFICERS AND DEPARTMENT HEADS - JANUARY 1, 1978 - 1979 



Accountant 


Robert H. Peters 


Animal Inspector 


Joseph V. Balestrieri 


Assistant Town Manager 


Reginald Stapczynski 


Cemetery Superintendent 


Francis E. Downs 


Civil Defense Director 


Silverius J. Blonigen 


Constable 


James Edward Burke 


Constable 


Arthur V. Lynch 


Dog Officer 


Joseph V. Balestrieri 


Engineer 


Robert L. Higgins 


Fire Chief 


Arthur J. Boudreau 


Gas Inspector 


William R. Harrison 


Highway Superintendent 


Robert P. Palmer 


Inspector of Buildings 


Charles P. Lawrenson 


Ipswich River Watershed Commission 


Herbert D. Nickerson 


Librarian 


Philip W. Meriam 


Medical Agent, Board of Health 




Metropolitan Area Planning Council 


Madelyn A. McKie 


Middlesex Canal Commission 


O J "I _ T T 1 1 

Stanley Webber 


Middlesex County Advisory Board 


Michael A. Caira 


Milk Inspector 


Ernest F. Romano 


Nurse, Public Health 


Anne Butters, R.N. 


Plumbing Inspector 


William R. Harrison 


Public Building Superintendent 


Roy P. McClanahan 


Police Chief 


Paul J. Lynch 


Recreation Director 


Ronald Swasey 


Sealer of Weights and Measures 


Martin P. Farrell 


Town Clerk 


Priscilla R. Ward 


Town Clerk (Assistant) 


Kathleen M. Scanlon 


Town Collector 


Marion C. Murphy 


Town Collector (Deputy) 


Catherine P. Lindmark 


Town Counsel 


Alan Altman 


Town Sanitarian 


Ernest F. Romano 


Town Treasurer 


Rachel M. Burns 


Town Treasurer (Assistant) 


Elizabeth R. Fosgate 


Tree and Moth Superintendent 


Thomas 0. Sullivan 


Veterans' Agent 


Paul A. Farrell 


Veterans' Grave Officer 


Paul A. Farrell 


Water Superintendent 


Kenneth C. Motschman 


Wire Inspector 


Charles L. Webster 




Retiring Larry Cushing and Chairman A/do Caira 



Board of Assessors 



RECAPITULATION - 1979 FISCAL YEAR 



Total Appropriations (Taxation) 

Total Appropriations (Available Funds) 

Total Deficits 

School Lunch Program 

Elderly Lunch Program 

Free Public Libraries 

Special Education Grant Chapter 766 

Amount Necessary to Satisfy Final Court Judgment 

Appropriation Overdrafts - Snow & Ice Removal 

County Retirement Assessment 

County Tax 

Underestimate 
County Hospital 

Underestimate 
State Recreation Areas 

Underestimate 
Metropolitan Districts Area Charge 

Underestimate 
Mass. Bay Transportation Authority 
Motor Vehicle Excise Tax Bills 
Air Pollution Control Districts 

Underestimate 
Metropolitan Area Planning Council 
Ipswich River Water Shed 
Overlay of Current Year 

Gross Amount to be Raised 



$ 13,983,566.00 
1,125,257.00 
381,063.57 
36,814.00 
11,000.00 
6,621.00 
19,721.00 
15,062.21 
48,790.29 
305,520.00 
283,657.48 
104,530.46 
20,214.97 
6,738.33 
92,908.66 
2,765.10 
87,675.15 
5,430.61 
238,000.00 
2,484.75 
1,648.37 
59.75 
2,560.12 
44.91 
242,017.32 



Less Estimated Receipts and Available Funds: 

1979 Fiscal Year Estimated Receipts from Local Aid 

and Agency Funds 
Motor Vehicle and Trailer Excise 
Licenses 
Fines 

Special Assessments 

General Government 

Protection of Persons and Property 

Health and Sanitation 

Highways 

Libraries 

Cemeteries 

Farm Animal and Machinery Excise 
Interest 

Ambulance Services 

Sewer Revenue 

Miscellaneous 

Dog License Reimbursement 

Shawsheen Regional School 

Overestimates 

Voted from Available Funds 

Total Estimated Receipts 

Net amount to be Raised by Taxation 



$ 2,727,001.48 
651,486.00 
8,000.00 
4,264.00 
25,301.00 
11,909.00 
39,664.00 
3,135.00 
910.00 
896.00 
10,112.00 
153.00 
121,456.00 
4,847.00 
72,228.00 
6,326.00 
3,061.00 
63,359.00 
16,192.46 
1,125,257.00 



10 



Recapitulation - 1979 Fiscal Year (continued) 

Personal Property $ 5,184,340.00 @ 79.00 per M 

Real Estate 148,342,155.00 @ 79.00 per M 

Total Levied on Property 

Items not entering into the determination of the Tax Rate: 

L. Betterments and Special Assessments added to Taxes: 

a. Street Betterments and Interest 

b. Water Betterments and Interest 

c. Sewer Betterments and Interest 

2. Liens added to Taxes: 

a. Water Liens 

b. Sewer Liens 



Total of all other commitments 



$ 409,562.86 
11,719,030.25 
$ 12,128,593.11 



10,803.54 
13,108.74 
12,020.59 



30,279.09 
1,292.13 
$ 67,504.09 

$ 12,196,097.20 



Dog Officer 



Dogs Licensed 1,658 

Dogs Confined 357 

Complaints Covered 3,340 

Court Complaints 370 

Court Fines $3,640 

Dogs Disposed of 470 

Dogs Killed by Cars 72 

Residents Notified for Licenses 1,180 



11 



Town Treasurer 



GENERAL FUND 



Cash on Hand 7/1/77 
Receipts Fiscal 1978 
Disbursements Fiscal 1978 
Cash on Hand 6/30/78 



REVENUE SHARING (Federal) 



Cash on Hand 7/1/77 

Receipts Fiscal 1978 (Including earnings) 
Disbursements Fiscal 1978 
Cash on Hand 6/30/78 



$ 2,197,463.17 
37,161,398.15 
37,035,941.60 

$ 2,322,919.72 



7,731.42 
510,925.16 
461,180.00 
57,476.58 



SPECIAL PROJECT - WATER MAINS FUNDED BY 
ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT ADMINISTRATION (Federal) 



Cash on Hand 7/1/77 
Receipts Fiscal 1978 
Disbursements Fiscal 1978 
Cash on Hand 6/30/78 



0.00 
105,671.97 
105,671.97 

0.00 



During calendar 1978 it was necessary to borrow twice (March and September) in anticipation of tax revenue. 
While we have Tax Anticipation Notes outstanding, it is illegal to invest general fund monies. 

INVESTMENTS: 



During calendar 1978, the program of investing idle funds in Certificates of Deposit, U.S. Treasury Note 
repurchase agreements, and daily interest accounts, was continued with the following results: 



Designation of Funds 

Revenue Sharing 
AntiRecession 
General Funds 

Investments 

Daily Interest Accounts 
TOTAL EARNINGS 



1978 Earnings 

$ 10,946.53 
5,343.52 

63,740.91 
74,828.65 
$ 154,859.61 



12 



Town Collector 



COMMITTMENTS - 1978 

1980 - Real Estate 

1979 - Real Estate 

1979 - Apport. Water Betterment 

Committed Interest 

1979 - Apport. Street Betterment 

Committed Interest 

1979 - Water Lien 

1979 - Apport. Sewer Betterment 

Committed Interest 

1979 - Sewer Lien 

Personal Property 
Farm 

Real Estate 
Excise 
Excise 
Excise 

Water Betterment - Paid in Full 
Committed Interest 
Apport. Street Betterment 
Committed Interest 
Apport. Street Betterment 
Committed Interest 
Ambulance 

TOTAL COMMITTMENTS 



1979 - 

1979 - 

1978 - 

1978 - 

1977 - 

1976 - 
Apport 



Paid in Full 



- Paid in Full 



1,106.00 
11,719,468.70 
8,259.10 
4,849.64 
6,975.36 
3,828.18 
31,684.47 
7,228.27 
4,792.32 
1,292.13 
409,562.90 
132.10 
36.00 
840,747.83 
53,619.27 
307.18 
3,267.71 
97.35 
2,777.87 
17.98 
8,547.60 
23.74 
9,705.00 
$13,118,326.70 



COLLECTIONS - 1978 
Real Estate 

Apport. Water Betterment 
Committed Interest 
Apport. Street Betterment 
Committed Interest 
Water Liens 

Apport. Sewer Betterment 
Committed Interest 
Sewer Liens 
Personal Property 
Farm 

Motor Vehicle Excise 

Apport. Water Better. -Pd. in Full 

Committed Interest 

Apport. Street Better .-Pd. in Full 

Committed Interest 

Apport. Sewer Better. -Pd. in Full 

Committed Interest 

Interest and Costs 

Municipal Lien Cert. & Better. Cert 

Ambulance 

Advertising 

TOTAL COLLECTIONS 



$5, 



1979 

407,466.38 
5,990.21 
3,506.89 
6,036.66 
3,231.35 
25,492.38 
3,431.88 
2,362.64 
1,292.13 

188,586.29 
132.10 



1978 
$5,544,086.57 

1,255.03 

1,132.22 
624.08 
401.37 

3,560.99 



198,907.40 
183.25 
578,411.82 
3,267.71 
97.35 
2,777.87 
17.98 
8,547.60 
23.74 
49,722.44 
3,845.00 
4,789.08 
238.00 

13 



1977 
$ 86,033.70 
952.88 
754.13 



1,162.75 

253.08 
154,746.68 



OTHER YEARS 
38,760.42 
243.73 
97.60 



1,234.85 

768.00 
8,971.22 



$12,343,397.45 



Town Clerk 



Vital Statistics - Chapter 46, General Laws as amended: 

Births - final figure for 1977 202 
Births - actually recorded for 1978 176 

Marriage Intentions recorded for 1978 169 
Marriages recorded for 1978 201 

Deaths recorded for 1978 101 

Chapter 46, Section 15: 

The Town Clerk will furnish to parents, householders, physicians, and registered hospital medical officers 
applying therefor, blanks for the return of births as required by law. 

Chapter 114, Section 45: 

Eighteen burial permits have been issued by the Town Clerk as Special Agent for the Board of Health in 1978. 
Seven out-of-state deaths were reported and filed in this office. Twenty-three Wilmington Veterans were 
buried in Wilmington Cemetery. 

TOWN RECORDS 

Permits and Certificates of Registration for the Storage of Inflammables: 

These licenses must be registered by the owner of occupant of the land, or by the holder of the license in th« 
Town Clerk's office on or before April 30 of each year. Notification will be sent on or about March 15. If 
not registered, by law the license may be revoked by the licensing authority after a public hearing. 



Inflammables 76 

Uniform Commercial Code recordings 300 

Uniform Commercial Code terminations 44 

Federal Tax Lien recordings 13 

Dog Licenses issued 1654 

Duplicate dog tags issued 16 

Business Certificates recorded 35 

Business withdrawals 

Fish and Game Licenses 822 

Pole Locations 6 

Medical Registrations 

Bazaars and Raffles 8 



Other Services: 

Keep minutes of Annual and Special Town Meetings up-to-date. (Certify same upon request.) 
Town Clerk has complete charge of elections. Records election results. 
Send State election results to State Secretary forthwith. 

Provide the County of Middlesex with up-to-date list of all persons over the age of 17 years for Jury Pool. 
Certify an undetermined number of Births, Marriages and Deaths. 

Certify an undetermined number of Births (Abstract form) used for school entrance, driver's licenses, 
out-of-state travel and job applications. 



14 



Other Services (continued) 



Supply proof of residence by letter or card - used for college entrance. 
Provide for sale miscellaneous books and maps. 

Receive writs against the Town and forward copies of same to the Town Counsel. 

Occasionally appear in court for the Town, when summoned - producing all papers and maps required. 
Complete notes of the Town as received from the Town Treasurer - after approval by the Board of Selectmen. 
Certify same. 

Record Board of Appeals applications and decisions and certify same as provided in Chapter 40A, sections 
11 and 15 of the Massachusetts General Laws. 
Keep a file of decisions by the Town Counsel. 
Record minutes and decisions of the Planning Board. 
Keep a file of Annual Reports. 

Keep a file of all Zoning and Town By-Law changes as approved by the Attorney General. 
Swear Town officers to the faithful performance of their duties and keep a record of same. 
Accept business registrations and keep a file for public use. 

Prepare the Town Ballot for the voting machines and order the printing of same. 
Supervise payrolls for the Town Meeting and Election workers. 

Supervise the distribution and filing of nomination papers and the report of campaign and political 
finance expenditures. 

The Town Clerk supervised and assisted the Maintenance department with scraping, repainting, and rearranging 
the walk- in vault, improving the accessibility and aroma. 

The Clerk's office supervised and prepared for the Annual Town Meeting and election, the State Primary, State 
Election and a Special Town Meeting this past year. 

By virtue of her office, the Town Clerk is clerk to the Board of Registrars. In this capacity, she has - 
Met with the Board of Registrars on regular meetings and special meetings. 
Kept the minutes of the Board up-to-date. 
Supervised the Annual Census by mail. 
Kept the voting list up-to-date. 

Registered voters during office hours and met with the Board for evening sessions and certification of 
nomination papers. 

Supervised the printing of the "Persons Listed" book. 




Esther Russell feted on Retirement 

15 



Board of Registrars 



In accordance with Section 1, Chapter 3, of the Town By-Laws, meetings of the Board of Registrars were held on 
the second Monday of each month for the registration of voters and to conduct business. Under Chapter 626 of 
the Acts of 1958, these meetings are open to the public and the press, and it is so posted in the Town Hall. 

The Board has held registration periods as are required by the law for the Annual Town Meeting, Town Election, 
State Primary, State Election and the Special Town Meeting held in December. 

The Town Clerk attended Massachusetts Town Clerks conferences in order to keep up with the constantly changing 
election laws. She also attended the meetings held at the Court House implementing the change in jury proce- 
dure in Middlesex County. 

The 1978 Census was taken with no mishaps. In order to keep the voting list up-to-date the Board annually 
compares the voting list with the annual census. If a voter's name does not appear on the census, it is sub- 
ject to removal from the voting list. Drop letters are sent to these people advising them to get in touch witr 
the Town Clerk. 

New residents are requested to notify the Board of Registrars of the date which they take residence in the towr. 
Any change in address within the town during the year should be brought to the attention of the Board of 
Registrars so that your name will not be inadvertently removed from the voting list. 

1975 State Census (considered 'Official') 17,656 
1978 Town Census estimated 17,908 

Registered voters as of October 10, 1978 

Democrats 4,178 

Republicans 931 

Independents A , 169 

Total 9,278 




* . m r 




Dr. Jean Mayer speaks at Regional Health Center Dedication 

16 



Town Engineer 



Evaluation of Work Load 



An examination of the work load for the Engineering Department reveals that we spent our time this year as 
follows: 20% Highway Department, Construction Projects; 25% Water and Sewer Board, Construction Projects; 
15% Planning Board, Subdivisions; 20% Town Wide and Future Projects; 10% Town Manager and Selectmen; 10% All 
Others. 

In-House Procedures 



The updating of Assessors' maps continues to be a problem which requires a large part of our time. Current 
updated Assessors' maps are a valuable tool for the town's citizens and other town departments, boards and 
commissions . 

Cataloguing of the department's material, which was started sometime ago, was continued with summer help 
personnel . 

Projects for the Year 

Streets that were prepared for Town Meeting action this year were the layouts of Arlene Avenue, Ella Avenue 
and Franklin Avenue and the alteration and relocation of Forest Street, Lowell Street, West Street, and Woburn 
Street. Subdivision streets inspected during the year to assure compliance with Town standards for future 
street acceptnace were Mill Road and Jonspin Road and in Lucaya Estates, Cormier Park, Jewel Industrial Park, 
iand Woburn Heights. 

Each year the department prepares, executes, and administers a number of construction contracts. This year 
the projects completed were: The construction of a sidewalk on Glen Road as voted by the Town Meeting, finish- 
ing Glen Acres Estates after the developer defaulted, and the construction of an all-weather running track at 
the High School as voted by the Town Meeting. 

In addition to the routine projects which the department performs, we try to complete one project of lasting 
significance each year. This year, the department prepared, printed, and distributed a new "Map of Conserva- 
tion Land" which is available through the Conservation Commission and in several Town Departments. 

Conclusion 



The department continues to adjust time and resource priorities to better serve Town-wide interests. 



17 



Highway Department 



All the regular highway maintenance work was carried out during the year, such as sweeping streets, erection 
of street signs, pathcing streets, scraping back roads, cleaning catch basins, picking up trash along our 
roadsides, painting and replacing guardrails, etc. 

Si dewa 1 k J? r_ o, g_r_ am : 

Forest Street sidewalk is now about 90% completed. 
Drain age : 

The drainage problems on the following streets have been eliminated: Lawrence Street, Marcia Road, McDonald 
Road, Chestnut Street, Redwood Terrace, Englewood Drive, Hobson Avenue, Washington Avenue, Arlene Avenue, 
Forest Street and Faulkner Avenue. The culvert was extended on Federal Street. Many more drainage problems 
still exist. A study is being made by the Engineering Department to find a way to resolve them. 

Snow and Ice Removal : 

The winter of 1978 will long be remembered as the worst in 100 years. The Highway Department recorded over 
94" of snow. The average snow fall for this area is about 54". Needless to say this past winter was a very 
expensive and major problem. 

Chapter 90 Maintenance and Hot Top Program : 

The following streets were upgraded with 1 1/4" of bituminous concrete finish: Shawsheen Avenue from Aldrich 
Road to Lake Street, Allen Park Drive, and approximately 400 feet of Reed Street. 

The following streets were upgraded with about 1 3/4" of bituminous concrete binder: Woburn Street from aboul 
Lowell Street to the Woburn Line, Redwood Terrace and Englewood Drive. 

Roadside Pickup 

This program is sponsored by the Chamber of Commerce. I would like to take this opportunity to thank the 
Chamber of Commerce and all the volunteers who participated in this program. 

Brooks and Streams Maintenance : 

As in the past years we used N.Y.C. and C.E.T.A. personnel (Federal funded programs) for our brooks and 
streams maintenance. 

Chapter 81 Maintenance : 

The following streets were resurfaced with a stone seal - all or in part: West Street, Kilmarnock Street, 
Federal Street, Powderhouse Circle, Shady Lane Drive, Lawrence Street, Glendale Circle School Street, Kelly 
Road, Chandler Road, Andover Street, Barbara Avenue, Anthony Avenue, Arlene Avenue, Dorothy Avenue, Pineview 
Road, McDonald Road, Oak Street, Royal Street, Marion Street, Chestnut Street, Swain Road, Cobalt Street, 
Bridge Lane, Nassau Avenue, Lawrence Court, Catherine Avenue, Cochrane Road, Edwards Road, Jaquith Road and 
Brand Avenue. 



18 



Equipment 



The mechanics, foreman and I have checked over the following equipment and sincerely conclude that we must 
replace 3 dump trucks, 3 pickup trucks, 1 sweeper and a sander body for ice and snow removal. 

In concluding my report, I would like to take this opportunity to thank the Water, Tree and Cemetery Depart- 
ments for their help during snow storms. The Police Department for keeping us informed during the winter 
months of snow and ice conditions between the hours of 4:00 p.m. and 7:30 a.m. weekdays, and Saturday, Sunday 
and holidays. To all the various departments for the cooperation extended this department during 1978. To 
the Town Manager and the Board of Selectmen for their support throughout the year. Last, but not least, the 
employees of the Highway Department who made 1978 a very productive year, my sincere thanks and appreciation. 



Tree Department 



The Tree Department carried on its routine work of trimming, cutting and removing trees. Fifty-six roadside 
trees were removed. Worked again on Forest Street sidewalk construction to remove trees that could not be 
saved. A great deal of tree trimming was done on roadside trees, especially our maple trees that have a 
fairly new disease called dieback. In April the annual tree planting program took place. 200 trees were 
given out. There will be no tree planting program for 1979. Approximately 55 hornets nests were removed upon 
request from residents. Worked with School Maintenance and Public Buildings Department replacing lights and 
flag pole ropes. At the request of the Beautif ication Committee, Christmas decorations were put up throughout 
the Town. Tree Department equipment was used to plow snow for the Highway Department. 

Dutch Elm Disease : 

Samples of elm trees were taken and sent to the University of Massachusetts for testing. 58 dutch elm trees 
were removed. 

Insect Pest Control : 

Spraying was done to control elm leaf beetles, ticks, clinch bugs, Japanese beetle, fall web worms, Eastern 
tent caterpillars and pine saw flies. Spraying was also done to control the spread of poison ivy. 

Mosquito Control Program : 

The old fog generator was replaced with a new ULV generator this year. It is much safer for the residents and 
also the operator. Mosquito control hours are between 8:00 p.m. and 12:00 a.m. Larvaecide was put in all 
trapped water holes and also some catch basins'. We hope to expand this program. 



I would like to thank the Town Manager and the Board of Selectmen for their support, the Town departments for 
their cooperation, and the men of the Tree Department for their efforts during the year 1978. 



19 




Buildings 



No. 



1976 
Valuation 



No. 



1977 
Valuation 



No. 



Dwelling (single family) 
Residential Garages 
Additions & Alterations 



Industrial Buildings 

Commercial Buildings 

Add. & Alterations (non-res.) 

Swimming Pools 

Signs 

Utility Buildings 
Office Buildings 
Recreational Buildings 
Shed & Barns 
Medical Buildings 
Temporary Buildings 
Woodburning Stoves 



68 
8 

132 



4 
4 
21 
47 
17 


1 
7 






$ 1,951,000 
37,000 
490,625 
$ 2,478,625 

$ 1,010,000 
64,600 
482,300 
130,850 
7,927 



145,000 
4,950 



$ 1,845,627 
$ 4,324,252 



51 
10 
110 



6 
4 
17 
43 
11 


1 
9 
1 
1 




$ 1,435,000 
36,600 
418,750 
$ 1,890,350 

$ 5,528,000 
219,000 
549,000 
158,050 
11,485 



1,700 
21,019 
2,009,000 
1,200 



28 
9 

105 



5 
1 
16 
42 
16 
2 


8 

1 
2 



$ 1.359.40C 



$ 8,498,454 
$ 10,388,804 



$ 1,874,70C 
$ 3, 234, IPC 



Renewals 

Demolitions 

Fire Damage & Repair 

Foundations 



5 
13 

2 
30 
359 



$ 95,950 
20,000 
53,500 

$ 169,450 



5 
7 
1 
9 

286 



36,400 
14,000 
19,500 
69,900 



6 
14 


5 

260 



REPORT OF FEES RECEIVED AND TURNED OVER TO TREASURER: 



Building Permits 
Wiring Permits 
Gas Permits 
Plumbing Permits 



359 
376 
100 
118 
953 



$ 11,206.00 
3,849.75 
876.00 
701.50 

$ 16,633.25 



286 
343 
125 
85 
839 



$ 29,036.50 
4,131.75 
1,137.50 
894.00 

$ 35,199.75 



261 
299 
90 
80 
730 



$ 7,596. 
4,009.7! 
822.0C 
755.5C 

$ 13,184.0! 



20 



Board of Appeals 



Applicant 
Case #1-78 

Compugraphic Corporation 
Allen Ackerblom, Agent 
Jerald Sawyer, Rep. 

Case #2-78 
Sandra Romsey 

Case #3-78 
David Scott 



Reason for Appeal 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule 
of Requirements) to erect a sign within a required 
reserve front yard on property located at 66 Concord 
Street. 



To erect a dwelling unit within a required side yard 
on property located on Adams Street. 



To acquire a variance from Section IV-3 (off-street 
parking) to allow for the reduction in number of 
spaces required for property located at 6 Middlesex 
Avenue. 



Decision 



Denied 



Withdrawn 



Granted 



Case #4-78 

Brenda Fay McLaughlin 



To build an addition within a required reserve side 
at 7 Belmont Avenue . 



Granted 



Case #5-78 

Martin & Pauline Short 



To acquire a variance to allow for the construction 
of an addition within a required reserve side yard 
at 536 Woburn Street. 



Granted 



Case #6-78 
Joseph Langone 



To acquire a variance from Section V-5 (lot depth) 
for nine lots having sufficient frontage and area 
for property located on Mill Road but lacking proper 
depth when measured at right angles. 



Denied 



Case #7-78 
Kenneth J. Miller 



Case #8-78 
Joseph L. Francis 



To acquire a variance from Section V-5 (lot depth) 
to allow for the construction of a single family 
dwelling on a lot having insufficient depth for 
property located on Middlesex Avenue. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) to erect an addition within a required 
reserve front area at 10 Carter Lane. 



Granted 



Granted 



21 



Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Decision 



Case #9-78 

James W. Meehan To acquire a variance from the Schedule of Requirements Granted 

(Section V-l) to allow a sign to be erected within a 
required reserve front yard at 212 Main Street 



Case #10-78 

Fred I. Rubin To acquire a special permit for the installation of Denied 

wall signs for property located on 324 Main Street. 



Case #11-78 

Priscilla R. Ward To acquire a variance from Section IV-1 which requires Granted 

a permanent means of access not less than thirty (30) 
feet in width, said property being located on Fitz 
Terrace. 



Case #12-78 

Anthony & Eleanor Carnabuci To acquire a special permit to allow as an accessory Denied 

use on a part-time basis, by appointment only, the 
professional or home occupation of an electrolysis 
at 30 Fairmont Avenue. 



Case #13-78 

A. Joseph Raetano 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) to allow for the construction of a 
single family dwelling on a lot having insufficient 
frontage for property located on Oakridge Circle. 



Denied 



Case #14-78 
Richard Stuart 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) for the purpose of erecting a single 
family dwelling on a lot having insufficient area 
for property located on Lee Avenue. 



Granted 



Case #15-78 
Eleanor M. Marzullo 



To acquire a special permit to allow an existing 
building to be replaced by a new single family dwell- 
ing, property located on 33 Aldrich Road. 



Granted 



Case #16-78 
Samuel E. Freeman 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) to allow for the erection of a sign 
within a required reserve front yard at Nichols St. 



Granted 



Case #17-78 

John T. & Mary T. Brackett 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) to allow for the construction of a 
garage within a required reserve front yard at 
Nichols Street. 



Granted 



Case #18-78 

Angelo & Thelma Grassia To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of Granted 

Requirements) for the purpose of erecting a single 
family dwelling on a lot having insufficient frontage 
at 138 Chestnut Street. 



Case #19-78 

Ralph B. Medbery To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of Granted 

Requirements) to permit the construction of a com- 
mercial building within a required reserve side yard, 
for property located on 460 Main Street. 



22 



Applicant 
Case #20-78 

Martin & Phyllisanne LaCava 



Case #21-78 
James V. Campbell 



Reason for Appeal 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) to permit the construction of a garage 
within a reserve side yard at 9 Fletcher Lane. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) to allow for the installation of a sign 
within a required reserve front yard, property located 
on 139 Main Street. 



Decision 



Granted 



Granted 



Case #22-78 

Walter E. & Pauline M. Moran 



Case #23-78 

George & Lorraine Hanna 



Case #24-78 



Carl L. & Carol A. Schultz 



Case #25-78 



U-Haul of Boston, Inc. 
Robert P. Sullivan, Agent 



Case #26-78 



James & Beverley Murray 



Case #27-78 



Richard J. Peters 



Case #28-78 



Joseph D'Amelio 



Case #29-78 



Salvatore D'Errico 



Case #30-78 



Alan P. Dellascio 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) to erect a garage within a required 
side yard at 7 Drury Lane. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) to erect an addition within a required 
reserve side yard at 42 Park Street. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) to erect an addition within a required 
reserve side yard at 6 Lawrence Court. 



To acquire a variance or special permit concerning 
clarification of By-Law provisions re General Busi- 
ness District uses, for property located on 275 
Main Street. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) to erect an addition within a required 
reserve side yard at 35 Aldrich Road. 



To acquire a special permit allowing the conversion 
of a single family dwelling with an In-Law Apartment 
at property located on Mystic Avenue. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) to erect an addition within a required 
reserve side yard at 33 Shawsheen Avenue. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) to allow the subdivision of a parcel 
of land into two (2) lots having insufficient front- 
age, but more than required depth and area at 213 
Burlington Avenue. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) to erect a deck within a required 
reserve rear yard at 87 Shawsheen Avenue. 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Denied 



Granted 



Denied 



Granted 



23 



Applicant 

Case #31-78 
John T. Spinelli 



Case #32-78 
Michael L. Kelly 



Case #33-78 
Harrison H. Fogg 



Case #34-78 
Patrick F. Valente 



Reason for Appeal 



To acquire a variance from Section IV- 3 (Off-Street 
Parking) to allow for the expansion of an Industrial 
use for property located on 68 Jonspin Road. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) to allow the erection of certain signs 
within reserve yard areas at 1 Progress Way. 



Tc acquire a special permit as specified in Section 
VIII-4C, to allow a repair garage for vehicles in use, 
excluding junk storage or salvage operations, for 
property located on 200 Andover Street. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) to allow for the construction of a 
swimming pool within a required side yard at 331 
Chestnut Street. 



Decision 



Granted 



Denied 



Granted 



Granted 



Case #35-78 
David J. Fuller 



Case #36-78 

Edmund J. Corcoran, III 



Case #37-78 

Robert P. Knoettner 



To acquire a variance allowing the subdivision of the 
ten (10) acre lot into two parcels both having insuf- 
ficient frontage at 37 Swain Road. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) to erect an addition within a required 
reserve front and side yards at 615 Woburn Street. 



To acquire a special permit in accordance with Section 
III-4-B-5 to allow for the lawful business of manu- 
facturing and sales of recreational vehicles such as 
travel trailers, tent trailers and truck campers, 
motor homes and truck tops, for property located on 
17 Olde Ballardvale Street. 



Denied 



Granted 



Granted 



Case #38-78 
Ray Fitzmaurice 



Case #39-78 
Robert L. Higgins, 
Town Engineer 



To acquire a special permit in accordance with Section 
VI-D and a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of Re- 
quirements) to allow for the addition to a non- 
conforming use within a required reserve side yard, 
for property located on Eames Street. 



To acquire a special permit to allow for the public 
use of land located in the Flood Plain District in 
accordance with Section III-6-C, for property located 
on Church Street. 



Withdrawn 



Granted 



Case #40-78 

James J. & Helen L. Higgins 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) to allow a building to remain within 
a reserve side yard, property located at 7 Rhodes 
Street. 



Granted 



24 



Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Decision 



Case #41-78 

William & Audrey Paolini 
Joseph F. Courtney, Agent 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) to authorize the issuance of a building 
permit on a lot having less than the required area 
and frontage, for property located on Faulkner and 
Beeching Avenues. 



Granted 



Case #42-78 

Robert T. & Maria Ann Simone 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) to allow a dwelling unit to remain 
within a required reserve front yard at 27 Nathan Road. 



Granted 



Case #43-78 

Peter DeGennaro & Joanne Vilasi 



Case #44-78 

New England Telephone Company 
John M. Griffin, Agent 



To acquire a special permit in compliance with Section 
VI-1C authorizing the change from a professional of- 
fice business use to a General Business use for prop- 
erty located at 312 Main Street. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) to allow the erection of a 150-foot 
high telephone radio communication tower for property 
located on Main Street. 



Granted 



Denied 



Case #45-78 
Lawrence Nickerson 



To acquire a variance from Section III-1-A.9 to allow 
for the erection of a two-car garage in addition to 
an existing two-car garage at 19 Oakridge Circle. 



Withdrawn 



Case #46-78 

John R. & Beverly L. Harvey 



To acquire a variance to subdivide a parcel of land 
into two lots, one lot having insufficient frontage 
and depth, the other lot containing an existing 
dwelling having insufficient rear yard and front 
yard and to obtain a building permit for the con- 
struction of a new single family dwelling on Parker 
Street. 



Granted 



Case #47-78 
Lionel R. Jackson 



To acquire a variance to subdivide a parcel of land 
into three (3) non-conforming lots with more than the 
required area, but having insufficient frontage and 
depth, for property located on 16 Aldrich Road. 



Denied 



Case #48-78 

Town of Wilmington 

Charles Lawrenson, Agent 



To acquire a special permit in accordance with Section 
III-1-B.6 of the Town's Zoning By-Laws (Governmental 
Administration Building) for property located at 
Middlesex Avenue. 



Granted 



Case #49-78 
Joseph Scifo 



To acquire a variance to subdivide a lot into two non- 
conforming lots both having the required area, but 
having insufficient frontage and depth for property 
located on 44 Hopkins Street. 



Granted 



Case #50-78 



Leon P. & Nancy L. Durette 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) to erect a garage within a required 
reserve side yard at 50 West Street. 



Granted 



25 



Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Decision 



Case #51-78 
Edward C. Hall 



To acquire a variance to erect a single family 
dwelling on a lot having insufficient frontage and 
depth, for property located on Lexington Street. 



Granted 



Case #52-78 
Frederick L. Jaeschke 



Case #53-7 8 
Michael Campbell 



Case #54-78 
Arthur J. Durante 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l, Schedule 
of Requirements, to install an inground swimming 
pool within a required side yard at 7 Pleasant St. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) to erect a garage within a required 
reserve side yard at 19 Shady Lane Drive. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) to obtain a building permit to con- 
struct a garage within a required reserve side yard 
at 294 Salem Street. 



Granted 



Granted 



Denied 



Case #55-78 
Delbert A. Smith 



Case #56-78 



Anthony Montecalvo, Gerald 
Surrette, Mary A. Montecalvo, 
Joseph P. Day, Agent 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) to acquire a building permit to erect 
a solar collector within a required reserve rear 
yard at 43 Roosevelt Road. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) to allow for a structure to remain 
within a required reserve side yard, for property 
located at 11 Fairmeadow Road. 



Granted 



Granted 



Case #57-78 
Robert P. Auer 



Case #58-78 



Solid State Technology, Inc. 
Thomas C. Lemire, Agent 



Case #59-78 

Nash Realty, M. Nash, Leasee 
Stephen R. Whitney, Owner 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) to allow a building to remain within 
the required reserve front yard at 222 Andover Street. 



To acquire a special permit in accordance with Sec- 
tion VI-2 authorizing the temporary use for an office 
trailer at 11 Upton Court. 



To acquire a special permit to allow for the erection 
of a sign in accordance with Section III-3.B.5 at 
634 Main Street. 



Granted 



Denied 



Granted 



Case #60-78 
Lewis Carbone 



Case #61-78 



Dennis P. Rooney 
Edward Robertson, Agent 



To acquire a special permit in accordance with Sec- 
tion III.l.B.l to allow for the alteration and con- 
version of a one-family detached dwelling for use 
as a two-family dwelling at 71 Lowell Street. 



To acquire a special permit in accordance with Sec- 
tion III-4-B.5 to permit the storage and repair of 
contractor's equipment, on property located at 
904 Main Street. 



Denied 



Granted 



26 



Applicant 

Case #62-78 
Earl L. Hupper 



Reason for Appeal 



To acquire a special permit in accordance with Sec- 
tion III-4-B.5 to permit the storage and repair of 
contractor's equipment at property located at 137 
West Street. 



Decision 



Granted 



Case #63-78 

Joseph & Anne Guzzo 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) to allow for the installation of a 
swimming pool within a required reserve side yard 
at 510 Shawsheen Avenue. 



Granted 



Case #64-78 

David Kindred, Applicant 
Joseph F. Courtney, Agent 
Anna J. Jensen, Owner 

Case #65-78 

David & Beverly Fuller 



To acquire a variance to subdivide a parcel of land 
on Andover Street into building lots with insuffi- 
cient depth. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) for a parcel of land having insuffi- 
cient frontage and depth for property located at 
37 Swain Road. 



Granted 



Granted 



Case #66-78 
Lionel R. Jackson 



Case #67-78 

Samuel & Esther Freeman 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) to subdivide a parcel of land into 
three non-conforming lots, all having more than 
the required area but having insufficient frontage 
and depth, property located on Ferguson Road. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l, Schedule of 
Requirements, to erect an addition within a required 
reserve front yard for property located on 160 
Lowell Street. 



Granted 



Granted 



Case #68-78 

Robert & Angalena Brabant 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l, Schedule of 
Requirements, to allow an existing addition to remain 
within a required reserve side yard at 84 McDonald 
Road. 



Granted 



Case #69-78 

Surface Coatings, Inc. 
Joseph F. Courtney, Agent 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) to authorize the location of a build- 
ing within a required reserve side yard for property 
located on Eames Street. 



Granted 



Case #70-78 

Charles & Violet Duggan 



Case #71-78 



Lewis R. Gilbert 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) to subdivide a parcel of land into two 
non-conforming lots for property located at 128 
Aldrich Road. 



To acquire a special permit allowing a general ad- 
vertising sign for the sale of antiques for property 
located at 282A Main Street. 



Granted 



Denied 



27 



Applicant 



Reason for Appeal 



Decision 



Case #72-78 
Dennis Surprenant 



To acquire permission to enclose an existing carport 
located in a required reserve side yard by virtue of 
a previous variance for property located at 281 
Shawsheen Avenue. 



Denied 



Case #73-78 
Robert W. & Eliz. 



Case #74-78 



Landrigan 



Bioassay Systems Corporation 
Joseph F. Courtney, Agent 
Dominic Passanis & Frank 
Soracco, Trustees of 
Concord Realty Trust 



Case #75-78 

James V. DeCarolis 



To acquire a special permit in accordance with Sec- 
tion III-1.B1 to allow the alteration and conversion 
of a single family dwelling into a two-family dwell- 
ing (mother-in-law apartment). 



To acquire a special permit pursuant to Section III- 
4B (4) and (5) to authorize a biological and environ- 
mental research and development laboratory, including 
testing functions involving the raising and keeping 
of animals for medical and scientific research for 
property located at 10 Cornell Place. 



To acquire a variance from Section V-l (Schedule of 
Requirements) to allow for the construction of a 
dwelling in a required reserve side yard for property 
located on Federal Street. 



Granted 



Pending 



Granted 



Case #76-78 

Chester A. Bruce, Chairman 
Conservation Commission 



To acquire a variance from Section III-l-A.9.i and 
Section V-l (Schedule of Requirements) to allow for 
the erection of a sign within a required reserve 
front yard for property located on Wildwood Street. 



Granted 



Official Map 

Case #S-l-78 

Thomas E. & Debra Fowle, 

Applicants; Herbert D. Stevens, 

Owner 

Case #S-2-78 

Joseph E. Palczynski 



Case //S-3-78 

Kevin Warford, Applicant 
P.L. Tocci, Inc., Owner 



To acquire a variance to construct a single family 
dwelling on land owned by Herbert D. Stevens, on a 
way known as 11 Wabash Road. 



To acquire a variance to construct a single family 
dwelling on land known as Fourth Avenue and not 
shown on the Official Map. 



To acquire a variance to construct a single family 
dwelling on land known as 24 Birchwood Road. 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Case #S-4-78 

Patrick Giusto & Carmen Caso 



To acquire a variance to construct a single family 
dwelling on land known as Houghton Road and not 
shown on the Offical Map. 



Granted 



Case #S-5-78 
Ivan Quinchia 



Case #S-6-78 
Hobson Realty Trust 



To acquire a variance to construct a single family 
dwelling on land known as 4 Clifton Road and now 
shown on the Official Map. 



To acquire a variance to construct three family 
dwellings on land known as Mystic Avenue and not 
shown on the Official Map. 



Granted 



Granted 



28 



Applicant 
Official Map 
Case #S-7-78 

Edward G. Hall, Applicant 
Leo J. Cotta, Owner 

Case flS-8-78 
Noreen R. Pinkston 



Case flS-9-78 
Amaro Realty Trust 



Case //S-10-78 
Vincent F. DeMato 



Reason for Appeal 



To acquire a variance to construct a single family 
dwelling on land known as Lexington Street and not 
shown on the Official Map. 



To acquire a variance to construct a single family 
dwelling on land known as First Street, now 
University Street, and not shown on the Official 
Map (G.L. ch. 41, S.81E). 



To construct a single family dwelling on land known 
as Newland Avenue and not shown on the Official Map, 
G.L. ch. 41, S.81E. 



To construct a single family dwelling on land known 
as Houghton Road, shown on Assessor's Map 33, Lot 34A, 
and not shown on the Official Map G.L. ch 41, S.81E. 



Decision 



Granted 



Granted 



Granted 



Withdrawn 



Case //S-ll-78 
Michael Strow 



Case #S-12-78 
Edward C. Hill, Applicant 
Walter R. Pearson, Owner 
Joseph F. Courtney, Agent 



To construct a single family dwelling on land known 
as Brookline Avenue, shown on Assessor's Map 69, 
Lot 34, and not shown on the Official Map, G.L. ch. 
41, S.81E. 



To construct a single family dwelling on land located 
on Commonwealth Avenue (shown on Assessor's Map 40, 
Lot 161, SRA District) and not shown on the Official 
Map, G.L. ch. 41, S.81E. 



Granted 



Granted 



Case //S-13-78 
James G. Keramas 



To construct a single family dwelling on a way known 
as Woodside Avenue (shown on Assessor's Map 48, Parcel 
20) and not shown on the Official Map, G.L. ch. 41, 
S.81E. 



Granted 



Case //S-14-78 

Paul J. St. Hilaire, Applicant 
George & Shirley Hurley, 
Owners 



To construct a single family dwelling on a way known 
as Hanover Street (shown on Assessor's Map 41, Parcel 
22, 25, 26) and not shown on the Official Map, G.L. 
ch. 41, S.81E. 



Granted 



29 



Fire Department 



The manual force consists of the Chief, Deputy Chief, four Lieutenants and twenty-eight Privates. There is 
call force of seven members. The department responded to a total of one thousand eight hundred and seventy 
calls (1870). 



Residential Buildings 47 Out of Town Assistance 29 

Commercial Buildings 21 False Alarms or Needless Calls 123 

Vehicles 97 Rescue and Ambulance 753 

Brush, Grass, and Rubbish 596 Service Calls 200 

Estimated value of property endangered was 21,188,149 

Estimated property loss was 650,346 

Permits issued for storage of oil 60 

Permits issued for blasting 22 

Permits issued for fire alarms and inspections 26 

Permits issued for model rockets 9 

Permits issued for storage of black powder 13 

Permits issued for storage of propane gas 3 



As required by law, inspections of all schools, public buildings, and all inflammable storage were made. 

The Fire Prevention Bureau, under the direction of Deputy Chief Wandell, made all necessary inspections of al 
business establishments in Town. Local industries were assisted in the organization and training of fire 
brigades. Fire Prevention lectures were given to the school children. 

The Fire Alarm Division, under the direction of Private Blaisdell, made all necessary repairs to the fire 
alarm system and made one hundred seventy-one (171) changeovers for the light and telephone companies. 
Checked and serviced all fire alrm boxes. Put in service three new boxes (Box 3411) Compugraphic , 90 
Industrial Way; (Box 3165) Harwick Chemical, Jewell Drive; (box 6451) Wilmington Health Center, Salem Street. 
Replaced three old boxes. Put new circuit #4 into service. Also put up three miles of new R.C. wire on 
Salem Street, Middlesex Avenue and Burlington Avenue. 

Privates Erlmest Burns, Jr. and Phillip Watson attended fire-related courses at the Community Colleges. 
All of the Emergency Medical Technicians have been recertified by the State. 




Trask Warehouse Fire 



30 



Police Department 



I hereby respectfully submit my Annual Report covering the activities of the Wilmington Police Department for 
the year 1978. This is my "Thirty-first Annual Report" covering the years of 1948 through 1978, and my 
"Thirtieth" year as Chief of Police. 

As I write my "Final Report" to you as Town Manager and to the Honorable Board of Selectmen, I can truly tell 
you that I have enjoyed my work and the close working relationship with all whom I have had the pleasure of 
working with over the years. 

Whatever I did, I did it with complete dedication to the job and can honestly tell you that, to the best of my 
ability, I have done all that I could have done with every ounce of strength, good or bad, with its success or 
failure . 

I can also report that whatever I did for the Wilmington Police Department, or any member of it, was done with 
the firm conviction that it was in the best interest of the Wilmington Police Department; but more important, 
was that whatever I did for the Town of Wilmington and the residents of the town, was done with the same firm 
convictions that it was in the best interest of the Town of Wilmington. 

I did the "Job" with two wonderful thoughts ever before me: "That I did it "MY WAY" - firmly convinced that it 
I was "HIS WAY." Words of mine, whether written or spoken, will never be adequate enough to express my heartfelt 
'"Thanks" to those who supported, encouraged, or inspired me in any way in all my years with the Wilmington 
Police Department, especially the last thirty years as Chief of Police. I ask God to Bless each and everyone 
of you. Be assured that I will be eternally grateful for your faith, your confidence, your trust, but most of 
| all for your loyal and enduring friendship. 



ARRESTS: 

Assault & Battery 
Arson 

Auto Theft 

Breaking & Entering 

Disorderly Conduct 

Fraud (Larceny by Check) 

Forgery 

Homicide 

Larceny 

Narcotics 

Non-support 

j Rape (and Attempted Rape) 
Receiving Stolen Property 
Robbery-Armed & Strongarm 

i Sex Offenses 
Vagrancy 
Vandalism 

Violation of Liquor Laws 
Weapons Violations 
All Other Offenses 



36 
2 
24 
22 
31 
44 
1 
1 
30 
23 
2 
3 
4 
7 
7 
1 
12 
21 
1 

161 
433 



MOTOR VEHICLE ARRESTS: 

Driver's License Violations 
Endangering 

Leaving Scene after Property Damage 
Operating Under the Influence 
Unregistered and Uninsured 
Speed 

Using Without Authority 
All Others 

DETAINED FOR PROTECTIVE CUSTODY: NO ARREST: 

Age 17 and Under 

Age 18 

Age 19 

Age 20 

Age 21 

Age 22 

Age 23 

Age 24 

Age 25 to 29 
Age 30 and Over 



40 
20 
5 
86 
55 
125 
17 
231 
579 



76 
50 
31 
30 
26 
13 
12 
4 
32 
47 
321 



31 



CRIMES REPORTED: 



HOMICIDE: 

SEX OFFENSES: 
Rape 

Attempted Rapes 
Indecent Exposures 
Indecent Assaults 
Child Molesters 



ROBBERIES : 



Firearm 
Knife 
Strong Arm 



ASSAULTS: 

Gun 

Knife 

Other Dangerous Weapon 
Hands, Feet, etc. 
Other Simple Assaults 



BREAKING AND ENTERING: 
Forced Entry 
Entry, No Force 
Attempted Entry 



LARCENY: 

Pocketpicking 

Purse Snatching 

Shoplifting 

From Motor Vehicles 

M/V Parts & Accessories 

Bikes Stolen 

From Buildings 

From Coin Machines 

All Others 

MOTOR VEHICLES: 



Stolen from Wilmington-Recovered by Town 
Stolen in Town-Recovered Elsewhere 
Stolen Elsewhere-Recovered by Town 



2 
18 

8 
_5 
34 



4 
4 
_8 
16 



2 
3 
8 
20 
45 
78 



197 
14 
91 

302 



3 
6 
12 
142 
85 
51 
47 
2 

109 
451 

28 
38 
56 
]22 



MISCELLANEOUS: 

Arson and Bombing 

Burglar Alarms Responded to 

Disturbances 

Domestic Problems 

Emergencies 

Fires Responded to 

Juvenile Problems 

Lost and Found 

Malicious Damage 

Missing Persons 

Missing Persons Returned 

Phone Calls, Annoying, Suspicious, etc. 

Prowlers 

Sudden Deaths 

Suicides, Attempts 

Suspicious Activities Reports 

Miscellaneous Items 

Cruisers Dispatched 

Motor Vehicle Accidents 

Fatal Motor Vehicle Accidents 



OTHER DEPARTMENT FUNCTIONS: 
Firearm Identification Cards Issued 
License to Carry Firearms Issued 
Permits to Sell Ammunition 
Gunsmith Permits 
Liquor I.D. Cards Issued 



Reports to Insurance Companies & Attorneys 
for Verification of Residents with Claims 
of Loss 

Verification of Loss by Phone & Mail 

Licenses Suspended by Registry of 
Motor Vehicles 

Licenses Reinstated 

Empty Houses Checked While 
Residents Away 

Summonses Delivered 




26 j 
1,656 
1,301 ! 
162 
182 I 
199 
1,601 | 
32 
911 1 
51 
51 
65 
90 
12 
6 

756 
3,178 I i 
7,297 
992] 

3) j 

18,571 



145 
316 
4 
3 
64 
532 



415 
780 

34 
21 

180 

445 ■ 



Lieutenant A. John Imbimbo Retires This Year 

32 



Che retirement of Lieutenant A. John Imbimbo in June 

rhe appointment of Officer Robert E. Shelley as Safety Officer 

rhe appointment of Officer John Ritchie as Vandalism Officer 

rhe promotion of Officer David McCue to Sergeant (Provisional) 

rhe appointment of Officer Chris Neville to Permanent Intermittent 

Some of the accomplishments of Members of the Department are hereby noted: 



[he preceding figures are "just numbers' to all who read them, but they represent the total efforts and labors 
)f thirty-four regular Officers, twenty-two Traffic Supervisors, and about twenty Special Officers working 
:wenty-four hours a day, three hundred and sixty-five days. 

rhe Department makes note of some of the changes during the year 1978: 



Sergeant Bernard Nally received his Associate Degree in Law Enforcement from Northeastern University. 
Officer Robert LaRivee received his Associate Degree in Law Enforcement from Northeastern University. 
Sergeant David McCue received his Bachelor Degree in Law Enforcement from Northeastern University. 
All three men deserve to be congratulated on their determination to further their education in the interest of 
their work. 

Sergeant Bernard Nally is the Department's "Man" and Officer John Ritchie is the "Vandalism Officer" serving on 
the Vandalism Committee. 

Safety Officer Robert E. Shelley and Sergeant Maryann Langone, Traffic Supervisor, have devoted much time to the 
"Bus Evacuation Program" visiting the following schools: West Intermediate, North Intermediate, Woburn Street 
School, Swain School, Buzzell School, Boutwell School, Glen Road School, Shawsheen School, Wildwood Street and 
Walker School. This program was sponsored by the local Kiwanis Club, Lions Club and Rotary Club. Films were 
shown instructing the children how to get on and off the bus safely. Trombly's buses were made available to all 
schools for this program. Safety Officer Shelley distributed booklets entitled, "Join the School 7~s Safety 
Program" to about 3,300 children. 

At the request of the Police Department the Registry of Motor Vehicles CRAC Team set up Radar Enforcement 
Programs during the month of October. Five units were assigned for the month. 

The Wilmington Police Department telephone numbers are as follows: 



EMERGENCY CALLS ONLY 
ALL OTHER CALLS 



658-3331 and 658-3332 
658-5071 and 658-5072 



We also have a Woburn line for your convenience - 935-5966. 

Please call in anything you see that you feel may be important ... or suspicious. There are cruisers out there 
every minute of every day... radio equipped ... and one might be "just down the road" from where the action is. 

In concluding this report, may I take this opportunity to express my sincere thanks and appreciation to all 
those who have in any way been of help or assistance to the Wilmington Police Department in 1978. 

Special thanks and appreciation are hereby extended to the Town Manager, Assistant Town Manager, Board of 
Selectmen, Members of the Wilmington Police Department, Department Clerical Personnel, Traffic Supervisors, 
Wilmington Police Association and all department heads and their wonderful workers for their every effort and 
cooperation during the year 1978. My sincere thanks and appreciation! 



33 



<4« 



By Inspector Thomas J. O'Reilly 
Dublin, Ireland 



One of the longest serving, most seasoned law enforcement officials in the New England region is 
Paul J. Lynch, for 30 years Chief of Police of the town of Wilmington, Massachusetts. 

While the town of Wilmington is quite old by American standards-it was established on the 25th of Septembc! 
1731, after the settlers in the area had submitted a petition requesting permission to organize locally for 
public worship, resulting in the incorporation of "The Land of Goshen" and "The Land of Nod" into the Town of 
Wilmington-it remained small with a scattered population consisting mostly of farmers, whose main agriculture 
products consisted of apples and cranberries. In the mid-fifties it started to become a suburban community £ 
Boston, almost 20 miles away, and the population rose from 5,000 in 1950 to the present figure of 19,000. 

Chief Lynch, who was born in the area, went into police work in 1938 when he became a special officer in 
Wilmington. In 1942 he became a full-time officer, but a year later left for World War II. While in the am 
forces he kept his orientation. As a criminal investigator for the United States Army he was employed on spe 
cial assignments in Germany investigating war crimes, working with counter intelligence and in the provost 
marshall's office. 

Having returned to Wilmington in 1946 Lynch became Chief on October 20th, 1948. "The police department at 
that time consisted of seven men, which included the chief, the deputy chief, a sergeant and four patrolmen," 
he said, commenting on the expansion of the department. "Now, as well as myself, we have a lieutenant, seven 
sergeants, 24 patrolmen, two women police as well as part-time women police who do traffic duty." 

The area patrolled by the Wilmington Police Department covers approximately 19 square miles. Patrolling i 
by one-man cars, there being no foot patrols. "If I were to put a man on foot at the local shopping plaza, 
then the other shopping center would want one as well," the Chief said, "and we don't have that kind of man- 
power — the town couldn't afford it." A more valid explanation is one probably only noticed by a stranger — 
the housing density is quite low, three or four residences to the acre, resulting in town problems in a rural 
setting. 

SHIFTS 

A minimum patrol force of one sergeant and four patrolmen is always on duty at any time. "This strength 
must always be on the streets," explained Lynch, "but it is negotiated by the police officers' union and the 
Town Manager. If because of leave or sickness the quota is not available it must be filled at time and a hal 
I advise the Town Manager," he continued, "but I don't take part in the negotiations. Some Chiefs do, but I 
prefer to stay out of it." 

Each man remains on the same shift for a year — the shift hours being midnight to 8 a.m., 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. 
and 4 p.m. to midnight. The working days are four days on and two days off — the equivalent of a 37 1/3 hour 
week. These arrangements are also part of the negotiated contract. The two detective officers on the force 
nominally work the day and late shifts respectively, but are not restricted to these hours. Together with th 
detective sergeant they are experts in fingerprints and photography. 

Two patrolmen are dog handlers (known as K-9) and work a special tour, 7 p.m. to 3 a.m. The lieutenant is 
primarily occupied by court work. A patrolman is occupied full-time on narcotics and another special assign- 
ment is that of safety and juvenile officer. The part-time women traffic supervisors employed by the depart- 
ment for the protection of school children are sworn special officers and have police powers. "A lot of poli 
departments don't do this," the Chief said, "but I prefer all personnel to be sworn — it gives them responsi- 
bility and ensures commitment." 

There is no problem in Wilmington about the one-man car. One-man mobile patrolling was traditional in 
American policing and the two-man car developed later. And in areas where this development occurred problems 
have arisen where efforts have been made to change from two- to one-man manning. The patrolman is a veritabl 
arsenal. Apart from the hand-gun which every police officer carries on and off duty, each officer in uniform 
is equipped with a club (a baton of at least 24"), handcuffs of the snap-on variety, and chemical mace, that 
squirt of which renders the most violent prisoner ineffective. The car, called a cruiser, is equipped with a 
riot gun (a shot gun), and the officer has a personal radio as well as a radio in the car. There is a heavy 
mesh wire between the front passenger seat of the car and the rear passenger compartment. The rear doors are 
not capable of being opened from the inside. Both these measures facilitate the carrying of prisoners. 

The entire 19 square miles is policed from one building, first occupied in 1960. It is of modern colonial 
design and its facilities include a squad room, for briefing purposes, a pistol range, and administrative 



■ 



34 



offices. It is also equipped with laboratories for fingerprinting and photography, and with equipment for riot 
control, narcotics control, and for other criminal investigation activities. There are detention facilities for 
female prisoners and juveniles, as well as five cells for prisoners. These detention facilities are used only 
for confining prisoners until such time as they can be taken before the proper court. 

"We always have the facilities of the state police to back us up," the Chief elaborated, "and state police 
assistance is mandatory in case of serious crime such as murder. But while the state police will send in their 
experts, the crime always remains on my desk." Still a comparatively rural community, Wilmington is not re- 
garded as having a serious crime problem. There has not been a murder since 1932, although the bodies of vic- 
tims of gangland slayings have been dumped within the town limits on a couple of occasions. 

But crime rates are relative, and so the Annual Report is of interest. In 1976 there were 299 cases of break- 
ing and entering, and 426 cases of larceny. Robberies with violence accounted for eight cases and there were 71 
reported cases of assault. On the other side of the ledger, arrests for breaking and entering amounted in 1976 
to 21, and for larceny to 77. There were two arrests for robbery and 44 for assault. Seventy persons were ar- 
rested for drunken driving. In all a total of 921 persons were prosecuted in 1972, of which 562 were for motor 
vehicle offenses. In addition 411 persons were "detained for protective custody-no arrest" under the Massa- 
chusetts 24 hour detention law. 

"These are just figures to everyone," the Chief said in his Annual Report to the citizens of Wilmington, 
"numbers do not tell you much, that's for sure.. But if you want an explanation of any figures as they appear in 
this report, please call me any day (preferably), but I will be only too glad to answer any questions at night 
if you call. 

"We don't have organized crime in Wilmington," the Chief emphasized, using the American euphemism for the 
Mafia, "but I wish I could say the same for the whole of Massachusetts. And that," he added, "is one of the 
reasons why I would like to see a more centralized control of policing." The proliferation of law enforcement 
agencies in the United States is well known, as they follow the three-tiered political structure of Federal, 
State and Municipal/County. There are approximately 46,000 separate law enforcement agencies in the U.S. Be- 
cause of this decentralization there could theoretically be police agencies from five governmental levels oper- 
ating in a single area at the one time. These could include any one of a number of Federal police functions, 
one or more state police departments, a county sheriff, a township constable, members of a city police, a park 
or a highway police, a special district police, or independent state or county detectives. 

PROPOSALS 

Proposals are made from time to time for a complete take-over by the state police, responsible to State 
Government for the entire law enforcement function in the state. But while he thinks it a more logical and 
efficient way of policing, Chief Lynch does not see it happening. "The people of this country have been and 
are afraid of a police state," he explains, "and they remain adamant in this even when the experience of other 
countries is shown to them." 

GOOD COPS 

The Police Department gets it officers through the State Civil Service Scheme. An intending officer, aged 
between 19 and 32 applies to the Civil Service to take the police admission examination, and nominates in order 
of his choice the police departments in which he would most like to serve. "Most men put their own home town 
police first, and I like to see this. In fact if I got a prospective entrant who didn't put his home town first 
I'd want to know why. I look on it as a test for the kind of men I want-good, honest, dedicated cops." When 
vacancies arise the Town Manager requisitions from the State Government. The Chief and the Town Manager then 
select from the list of successful candidates supplies. Twelve-week training is supplied at the Massachusetts 
State Police Academy under the Local Police Department Training Programme. The academy also operates other in- 
service training programmes and courses provided by the International Association of Chiefs of Police and by 
the Federal Government are also utilized. Others are sent to the FBI Academy. Twelve members of the Wilmington 
Police Dept. are currently enrolled in degree courses in criminal justice being provided in neighboring colleges 
and universities. The provision of these courses in universities is due in part to the state programme encourag- 
ing further education for police officers by the provision of increases in pay which may amount to 25% of basic 
pay for those who pass degrees in criminal justice. 

Chief Lynch is an advocate of higher education for police. "It is a new era for police officers where police 
work is a science, and the laws are sophisticated and always changing. In the old days an officer bought his 
iuniform, was given a badge and a gun and sent into the streets," he said, "but that won't do today." His insis- 
tence on sending men for additional training, thus adding to the town budget, is sometimes objected to by Select- 
men on the grounds that the town cannot afford that level of training. "They say we can't afford to have it, but 
I say we can't afford not to have it, '"he says emphatically. 

He lectures frequently at the Police Academy. "I try to instill into the young men the idea that the most 
(important thing for a police officer is the realization that he is there to serve the people," he smiled. 

jirhe preceding report was prepared from material gathered by Inspector O'Reilly while visiting relatives in 
j (Wilmington and was published in the GARDA REVIEW, the Police magazine of Ireland. 



35 



Cemetery Department 



Routine maintenance was done throughout the year. Four boys from the SPEDY Program and ten men from the Com 
prehensive Employment Training Act assisted the regular employees. 

A large area was cleared of brush and trees. Dead trees and brush were removed from the Town Park. 

A foundation was installed at Rotary Park where the Cain family had a monument erected in memory of 
Fred F. Cain. 



Deloury Construction Company was hired to bulldoze an area for development. One thousand one hundred and 
twenty-five yards of sand fill was purchased for landscaping. The area designated as Section K was enlarged 

A sign was erected for the Conservation Committee at the site of conservation land on Wildwood Street. 

Cemetery employees assisted the Highway Department with snow removal. 

At this time I would like to extend many thanks to Town Officials and Town Employees for their support and 
cooperation during the year 1978. 



Burials : 



Receipts : 



Residents died in Wilmington 

Residents died elsewhere 

Non-residents 

Cremations 

Babies 

Transfers 



13 
52 
43 
3 
5 
1 

117 



Interments 
Foundations 
Setting Markers 
Affidavits 



$ 8,165 
1,244 
140 

26 

$ 9,575 



Reserve: 



Trust Fund: 



Sale of lots 



$ 8,806 



Perpetual Care 



$ 8,950 




Wildwood Cemetery, Memorial Day 1978 

36 



Water & Sewer Department 



PUMPING STATISTICS 



WATER SUPPLY 


1974 


1975 


1976 


1977 


1978 


Maximum Gallons Per Day 


4,120,000 


4,364,000 


4,922,000 


4,421,000 


4,530,000 


Maximum Gallons Per Week 


23,961,000 


26,641,000 


31,232,000 


26,521,000 


29,191,000 


Maximum Gallons Per Month 


97,404,000 


105,599,000 


116,396,000 


102,432,000 


113,113,000 


Average Gallons Per Day 


2,557,000 


2,647,000 


2,762,000 


2,840,000 


2,940,000 


Average Gallons Per Month 


77,790,000 


80,508,000 


84,006,000 


86,375,000 


89,432,000 


TOTAL GALLONS PER YEAR 


933,478,000 


966,090,000 


1,008,080,000 


1,036,494,000 


1,073,187,000 


ANNUAL RAINFALL 


37.90" 


50.97" 


34.67" 


46.31" 


31.33" 




CONSUMPTION 


STATISTICS-GALLONS 






Residential Use* 


302,309,627 


324,240,479 


329,744,851 


398,858,053 


321,073,950 


Percent of Total 


42.0% 


46.8% 


44.6% 


51.4% 


41.06% 


Industrial Use 


417,011,892 


369,269,678 


409,497,779 


376,981,836 


460,883,880 


Percent of Total 


57.9% 


53.2% 


55.3% 


48.6% 


58.9% 


Total Water Metered 


719,321,519 


693,510,157 


739,242,630 


775,839,889 


781,957,830 


Percent of Water Pumped** 


77.0% 


72.0% 


73.3% 


74.9% 


72.8% 



*Residential use includes small commercial users, that is, all water passing through 5/8" meters only. 

**The difference between the water pumped and the water metered, 291,229,170 gallons in 1978, represents water 
used for flushing of water mains, for fires and other hydrant uses, and water lost due to breaks and leakage 
throughout the system. 

WATER SUPPLY 

Our annual consumption continues to increase; 1978 pumpage was up 3 1/2% over 1977. To meet the demand of our 
water users, it was necessary to insert an article in the 1978 Annual Town Meeting for construction of a water 
treatment plant. A similar article was defeated at the 1974 Annual Town Meeting. Fortunately, the article 
passed this year. Without a water treatment plant a ban on the outside use of water during the summer months 
was inevitable. 



37 



The treatment plant will remove iron and manganese from the Chestnut Street well, Town Park well and two well 
at Butters Row. It will have a capacity of a-proximately 3 million gallons per day. To finance the treatmen 
plant it was necessary to raise the water rates by approximately 50%. The new rate schedule becomes effectiv 
with the January, 1979 billing. 

The construction of the treatment plant will involve three contracts, the first two of which went out to bid 
in December. The third contract will be awarded early this spring. The projected completion date is late 
1980. The total cost of the project is $2,750,000. We are seeking State funds for reimbursement of a portio 
of this cost. (Chapter 406 of the Acts of 1978) We are working closely with our State Representative in thi 
regard. When completed, the treatment plant will represent the most significant improvement to the water 
system in Water Department history. Until the plant is in operation, it will be necessary to again restrict 
the outside use of water during the summer months. We need everyone's cooperation to make this partial re- 
striction effective. Water conservation will have to become a part of everyone's lifestyle. 

WATER DISTRIBUTION SYSTEM 

The construction of water system improvements under a $590,000. grant from the Economic Development Administr; 
tion was completed and put into service. This project improved the hydraulics of the distribution system and 
improved fire protection in several areas of the Town. 



BY CONTRACTOR (EDA) 


MAINS INSTALLED 1978 
NUMBER OF FEET 


MAIN SIZE 


Salem Street 


4,800 


12" 


Chestnut Street 


3,300 


12" 


Burt Road 


1,050 


12" 


Cross Street 


750 


12" 


Harris Street 


650 


12" 


Cedar Street 


450 


12" 


Canal Street 


300 


12" 


BY DEVELOPER 






Ballardvale Street 


450 


12" 



This is a total of 11,750 feet of new water main. 14 hydrants were also added to the system. 
WATER QUALITY 

The Federal Safe Drinking Water Act which became effective in 1977 requires frequent water sampling. In this 
regard a total of 339 samples were analyzed from our system. This monitoring assures the water users of a 
safe, potable supply. The samples taken in 1978 continue to reflect a good quality water. 

A growing population places a strain on water quality when it encroaches on aquifer recharge areas. The Town 
residents and boards must become mindful of this danger. Activities and construction near our existing well- 
fields must be monitored and controlled. Contamination of our water supply will result in expensive treatment 
facilities. We all must become aware that the purity of our water supply is dependent upon how effectively 
the watershed is protected. 

SEWER SYSTEM 

Progress on Phase II of the Silver Lake Interceptor continued, with three contracts under construction. There 
are a total of seven contracts in the project. When complete, approximately 760 homes will be able to tie 
into the system. Contracts I and II are essentially complete; only testing and final acceptance remain. The 
third contract, consisting of a pumping station, is approximately 20% complete. We expect two or possibly 
three additional contracts to be ready for bid this spring. 

The current construction contractors have encountered many construction problems and delays. Many hours have 
been spent with the engineers and contractors attempting to resolve these problems. 

In a project of this magnitude, there are bound to be inconveniences to many residents. We ask for their 
patience and understanding. We are trying our best to keep the problems to a minimum. 

As part of the MDC system, we are subject to their regulations as well as those of the EPA. These regulations 



38 



are constantly changing and expanding. The most recent requirement is the implementation of an Industrial 
Cost Recovery Program. Uner this program, the MDC will calculate the portion of their construction projects 
attributable to industrial wastes. They will then allocate these costs to each town in proportion to its in- 
dividual industrial wastes. The town, in turn, must collect these charges from the industries and send them 
to the MDC. In addition to the MDC Industrial Cost Recovery Program, we must establish our own program for 
our construction projects. This program must be in effect by the end of the current construction program. 



Conservation Commission 



In its fifteenth year of active service to the town, the Wilmington Conservation Commission's busy schedule 
included thirty-four regular meetings, twenty- two Wetland Protection Act hearings and numerous other meetings 
with town officials and local boards, as well as, boards from neighboring towns, when there was a mutual con- 
cern for environmental protection, preservation of open space and water resources. One hundred fifty-four 
on-site inspections were conducted this year by the members, covering most all areas in and around Wilmington. 

Annual Activities 

In 1978, as in past years, three teenage boys were sponsored by the Commission to attend Massachusetts Junior 
Conservation Camp in Spencer, Massachusetts, for two weeks. Applications for camp scholarship is open to all 
Wilmington boys, ages 14 to 17. Those interested in attending the camp, may submit a written application to 
this Commission by April 15. We believe this is a valuable program and will continue to support it as long as 
there is an interest. 

We, also, held three public information programs, including films to enable the townspeople to better under- 
stand some of the goals of the Commission. 

Once again the Commission supported the Arbor Day School Program and one of our biggest undertakings was the 
planting of sapling trees on Conservation Commission land. 

On Student Government Day six student Conservation Commissioners were escorted to the Brown's Crossing Pumping 
Station to learn about our local water supply; Lawrence Experimental Station, which tests water supply state- 
wide; and Habitat, an environmental education center in Belmont, where they learned about the program, 
"Earthwatch." 

Inter-board Activities 

The time spent working with other boards and town officials is very beneficial to the Commission. It gives us 
an opportunity to view projects, while they are in the planning stages, so we can assess the environmental 
impact before final plans are approved. The Commission attended meetings of the Planning Board, Board of 
Selectmen, Board of Appeals when there were issues of mutual concern. 

The Conservation Commission appreciates the continuing support and cooperation of the citizens of Wilmington, 
boards, town officials and employees in making our Commission a success. 

We gratefully acknowledge the many years of dedicated and unselfish service to the town of a past member, 
Ursula Leahy, whose expertise and spirit of cooperation will be missed by all. Our new member to the 
Commission this year is Donald Ugolini. 



39 



Library Trustees 



Your Library Trustees, listed in the front of this booklet, hereby again report to the citizens of Wilmington 

During the year, the Trustees were saddened by the death of Mr. Philip B. Buzzell, whose 47 years of devoted 
and exceptional services to the Board will be irreplaceable. The Board regretfully accepted the resignation 
of Mrs. Anne Ballou as a Trustee. Because of their special talents and contributions to the Board, these two 
individuals will be greatly missed by the Trustees. However the remaining Trustees are very happy with the 
two new members who were appointed to the Board. Mrs. Esther Russell, retired Town Clerk, comes to us with 
many years of valuable service to the town and Mr. Bruce Conant, whose business experience, adds depth to our' 
Board . 

We are one of 380 public libraries in the state of Massachusetts. A library provides an information system 
which offers knowledge, pleasure and training through its various sources. It helps individuals gain greater 
professional success, be better citizens, and become more effective members of a family, a group, the communi 
or the world. One of our goals is to provide every resident of Wilmington with equal opportunity of access t 
information resources which will help the individual's educational, working, cultural and leisure-time needs 
and interest. We also provide a variety of experiences in order to foster continuing learning and creativity 
identification of new interests, preparation for retirement and personal enrichment. 

Because of the Trustees' goals and the talents and endeavors of our staff, the library is reaching and helpin 
more people each year. This is being accomplished at a much smaller rate of increase in cost than the rate o 
increase in inflation. We recognize the extra effort made by the staff in order to achieve this result. 

The circulation for 1977 was 117,352; for 1978 it was 129,828, or in one year an increase of over 10%. In 
1973 the circulation was only 99,183, so the increase in 5 years was an amazing 30%. 

The people continue to need, are using and are benefiting by the library. In 1977 there were 400 transaction 
a day. In 1978 there were 444. Are we needed? 

Your Library Trustees are working for you to meet your needs, pleasures and wishes. Help us to help you. 




"Friends of Harnden Tavern" Sleighride 



40 



Librarian 



Philip Burnham Buzzell 
Library Trustee 
1931 - 1978 

Wise counselor and friend whose quiet 
unassuming service to the Memorial 
Library and to his Town is gratefully 
remembered. Truly, a gentle man whose 
humor and practical approach over 
forty-seven years of service as a 
Library Trustee made his support of 
the Memorial Library invaluable. 

In accordance with the statutes of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and the By-laws of the Town of Wilmington, 
it is with pleasure I submit my report with its accompanying statistics for the calendar year 1978. 

The Memorial Library's performance and activity is frequently measured by circulation statistics. Circulation 
reached its highest recorded point in 1978! It approached 130,000 and represented a 10.4% increase over the 
preceding year. The activities of the Children's Department measured a slight increase of 1.54%, and the Adult 
Department shows an increase of 8.52%. It is indeed gratifying to report a 10.4% increase which shows strong 
Town support of its library. 

"Back to Basics" and its emphasis on books and reading is clearly a major trend as evidenced for reference and 
reader's advisor service to children and to the adults who work with them. Mrs. Sarah Rueter, Head of Children's 
Services, worked closely once again with the Wilmington School Department. During the summer a thirty page 
list of high interest-low vocabulary books in the Children's Department collection was cooperatively produced 
for use with children in grades 2-6 reading below grade level. Specially gifted children now take part in the 
School Department's "Project Enterprise", and meet weekly with Mrs. Rueter at the library to read and discuss 
books. Library programs throughout the year featured books and reading, and a popular new program initiated 
was "reading Aloud" for ages 5-9. 

The Technical Services Department continued to efficiently provide the back-up for all other library services, 
but had many set-backs due to the loss of Comprehensive Employment Training Act personnel. It was frustrating 
at times to try and 'keeping on-top' of the daily routines required in ordering, receiving, cataloging and 
classifying, and processing of all materials. Members of the department, under the direction of Mrs. Louise 
Balser, performed all of the behind-the-scenes details with good grace despite changes in the utilization of 
full-time people drawn away by the demands of the daily public service schedule. 

The federally supported CETA funding terminated in the late Spring of 1978, but before its people left, a re- 
registration of all library patrons was begun. All patrons received new library cards, and the registration 
files were brought up to date. The library issued its first newsletter which was also made possible through 
CETA funding. 

The annual Town Meeting approved the funding for a Library Security and Book Theft Detection System. During 
the spring and summer the entire staff prepared for the installation of the system. A project team, super- 
vised by Tina Molesevich, Head of Reference and Adult Services, and Elliot Drew, Reference Librarian, 



41 



inventoried and prepared the collection. The fiction and non-fiction collections were shifted to opposite 
sides of the main floor. The reference desk along with the reference collection was moved to be in closer 
proximity to the card catalog, the main circulation desk, and major exit. All aspects of installing the syste- 
involved hard work. The cheerfulness, cooperation and willingness of the entire project team is gratefully 
acknowledged. The assistance of Mr. Roy McClanahan, Superintendent of Building and Grounds, and the men of 
his department, is also gratefully acknowledged. 

The installation of the Book Detection System was completed in late October, and the last piece of furniture 
needed to serve as a room divider was installed shortly after Christmas of this year. It is too early to say 
categorically that the system has shown dramatic results. Acceptance by the public has been matter-of-fact, 
and all reports indicate that the response has been positive. 

Staff new of 1978 is that Mrs. Rueter served on the planning committees of Children's Books International and 
the Loughborough International Seminar on Children's Literature, and is currently serving on the executive 
board of the Massachusetts Library Association. Children's Room Assistant Susan MacDonald created an impres- 
sive record with her work in the field of Children's Literature at Framingham State College. Miss Tina 
Molesevich attended special seminars related to business and legal services. In this connection, the Wilming- 
ton Memorial Library was awarded an L.S.C.A. Title I grant in the amount of $700 for law collection developmer 
The Library also received another grant in the amount of $2,000 to facilitate Interlibrary Loan Improvement 
through the acquisition of bibliographic sources. The last piece of staff news is that the Library Director 
is currently serving as Chairman of the Lowell Subregional Advisory Council for the Eastern Massachusetts 
Regional Library System. 

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Webber were honored on the occasion of their fifieth wedding anniversary by gifts to the 
Library. The memory of Harold Melzar was honored by a memorial gift. The affection held for Philip Buzzell 
was received in the form of several memorial gifts in his memory. These gifts are gratefully acknowledged, 
as are those other donations of books and materials received throughout the year. 

The statistics reveal the volume of activity. The vagaries of staffing as a result of C.E.T.A., and CETA's 
young adult program caused problems in the later half of 1978. The Director wishes to publicly thank the 
staff for its hard work, continued amenability, and flexibility in scheduling, and in getting the work done. 
The Library Director acknowledges the assistance of the Town Manager, Sterling C. Morris, and the former 
Assistant Town Manager, Peter L. Holzmeister, the Board of Library Trustees, and all those who have tangibly 
and intangibly expressed their support of their Memorial Library and those associated with it. 

On balance 1978 was good, busy and active year. 1979 promises to be a year of change and opportunity. 




Wilmington Community Fund Walk-A-Thon 

42 



LIBRARY STATISTICS 



Date of founding: 

Library Director: 

Number of days open during 1978: 

Number of volumes beginning of the year: 

Number of volumes purchased during the year: 

Number of volumes added as gifts: 

Number of volumes withdrawn during the year: 



2,656 
381 

1,563 
359 

67,576 
2,295 
1,956 
14 
272 
198 
263 



ILL: 62 



WM (Missing from library) : 
WLO (Long overdue): 
WW (Worn/damaged) : 
WD (Dated): 
Number of volumes as of December 31, 1978: 
Books 

A/V materials 
Microform 
Newspapers 
Periodicals 
Art prints 
Realia 

Total holdings as of December 31, 1978: 
Population: 1978 
Circulation: 1978 

Adult: 74,906 Children: 42,889 
Museum passes: 327 A/V: 5,925 
Periodicals: 5,011 Art prints: 708 
Circulation per capita: 
Retrospective circulation totals: 
1973 
1974 
1975 
1976 
1977 

Circulation control statistics: 

Number of adult reserves processed: 
Number of overdue notices sent: 
Number of bills sent: 
Number of overdue items involved: 
Number of bill items involved: 
Registered library patrons: 
Total reference and reader service statistics for 1978: 
Retrospective reference and reader services for: 
1973 
1974 
1975 
1976 
1977 

Inter library loans: 

Requests to other libraries 
Received from other libraries 
Number loaned to other libraries 
Appropriations and income for 1978: 
Per capita expenditures: 
Funds transferred to Town Treasurer: 

Payment for lost library material: 
Payment received for service chgs: 
Payment for lost borrowers cards: 
Postage refunds: 
New England Aquarium refund: 
Book order refund: 
Memorial gifts: 
Hours open each week: 



$365.49 
1,088.00 
37.75 
15.68 
50.00 
7.50 
118.00 



1871 

Philip W. Meriam 
292 
63,250 
8,840 
445 
- 4,959 



67,576 



72,574 
17,800 
129,828 



7.29 

99,183 
102,186 
117,612 
113,343 
117,352 

2,100 
9,195 
2,064 
22,705 
4,500 
6,488 
6,006 

3,198 
3,158 
3,689 
3,739 
5,522 

71 
48 
72 

$195,495 
$10.98 
$1,682.42 



69 



43 



Planning Board 



The Wilmington Planning Board this year had the distinct advantage of both input and output from five active 
members. Although the services of Martin Goldstein, a most capable Planning Assistant, were lost due to an 
attractive full-time position in a neighboring town, the board was able to find a suitable replacement in 
David Boutin. 

The Planning Board continues to meet each Tuesday evening on the second floor of the Whitefield School. 
Scheduled office hours are posted at the Town Hall and at the Planning Board office. The first and third 
Tuesdays are reserved for general planning and the second and fourth Tuesdays for consideration of Subdivisior 
Plans. 

To encourage greater interest in planning the town will participate in a Natural Resources Planning Program 
next year. Much of the field work will be conducted by volunteers from the town with professional guidance 
from the Middlesex Soils Conservation Service. From this work could emerge proposals for more in depth 
studies on protective zoning changes. 

General Planning 

Alternative styles of having the conservation of open space and the protection of natural resources has sparke 
a new direction in planning. After over a year of planning and input from other boards and citizens at large 
changes in Wilmington's Zoning By-Laws are being proposed. 

1. A zoning article will appear on the Town Warrant in March which will be entitled PRD, Planned Residential 
Development. This is an enabling act and would permit condominium type construction with an eye towards 
the conservation of open space and an alternative to conventional single family residence. The economic 
return to the town would be a favorable one. 

2. A zoning article has also been proposed for submission at a future Town Meeting to permit Cluster Develop 
ment. This style of construction has already been a great success in many of the cities and towns sur- 
rounding Wilmington. 

3. Assistance was rendered through practically the entire year to the Housing Authority in the locating of 
sites for the elderly. 

4. A review of Wilmington's Master Plan was conducted by the Wilmington League of Women Voters. Through thi: 
many meaningful suggestions arose and a continuing dialogue has been opened. 

5. The Board continues to play an active part in any Route 129 proposal. 

6. The Planning Board in an effort to encourage a healthy growth of industry has done several studies into 
available parcels of land and rail service. 

7. A simplified package has been prepared for the procedures to be followed by the applicant and the Plannin; 
Board upon submission of a Preliminary Subdivision Plan. 



44 



Subdivisions and Plans 



Forty -seven plans (approval not required under the Subdivision Control Law) were signed and four Subdivision 
Plans were received with a total filing fee collected of $3,405. The subdivision Plans included the following: 

Marion Street (Definitive) withdrawn 

Buttaro Estates off Aldrich Road (Preliminary) withdrawn 

Woburn Heights (Definitive) approved with conditions 

Ainsworth Road - Apple Valley (Preliminary) approved with conditions 

With the cooperation of our competent and dedicated staff the Planning Board hopes to undertake the following 
projects in the coming year. 

1. Continue to review parts of the Zoning By-Law to enable a greater mixture of housing types and a conser- 
vation of open space and natural resources. 

2. To participate whole-heartedly in the Natural Resources Planning Program and to make significant broad- 
based and sound recommendations upon its completion. 

3. Continue work on the concept of a Route 129 By-Pass. 

The Planning Board is greatful to all those who helped during the past year, especially Robert L. Higgins, 
Town Engineer, all Boards and Committees, the Town Manager and other Town Officials. Their continued help and 
support is requested in the coming year. 



Vandalism Committee 



In May, 1978, Dr. Walter Pierce, Superintendent of Schools, presented a report to the Board of Selectmen out- 
lining the cost of vandalism in the schools. It was made clear, at that time, the school cost was only a 
fraction of the total cost, and vandalism is a community-wide problem. It was recommended that a task force 
be appointed to investigate the problems and find possible solutions. 

A seventeen member Vandalism Committee was appointed by Sterling C. Morris, Town Manager, in June, 1978. It 
represents all segments of our community; police, schools, courts, parents, students and town departments. 

The Vandalism Committee received an eleven month report (January to November, 1978) from the Wilmington Police 
Department. From January to November there were 629 complaints of damage. These are broken down as follows: 
88 complaints (15%) involved school buildings, 264 (42%) involved private property, 152 complaints (24%) invol- 
ved industrial and commercial property, and 115 complaints (19%) involved public areas. Included in the com- 
plaints are a multiplicity of activities called vandalism or malicious damage from breaking windows to des- 
troying gardens. 

The Committee is undertaking the responsibility of informing the community that vandalism costs more than 
dollars; it costs in terms of physical injury, emotional strain and mental anguish. 

The Vandalism Committee is developing an on-going program to address these problems. The first step is to 
make people aware of vandalism. The second is to ask the community to become involved; it's a responsibility 
all of us share. Help your Vandalism Committee by becoming involved. 



45 



Public Buildings Department 



During the "great" storm of 1978, Wilmington's schools and town buildings suffered no damage. A few minor 
leaks were found, however, these were quickly repaired and created only minor problems. 

The roof replacement program has been completed at the West Intermediate School. The last section of the roof 
was replaced during the summer. The rear section of the roof at the Buzzell School was replaced, and the 
Harnden Tavern was completely reroofed with red cedar shingles after removal of the old shingles. 

Ramps were installed at the West Intermediate and Shawsheen Street School. The ramps make the buildings more 
accessible to people in wheelchairs. 

Voting machines were programmed and the polls set up for Town election, State primary and State elections. 

As part of the continuing effort to save energy, new windows were installed at the Swain School and new heat- 
ing control systems were installed at the High School and North Intermediate Schools. Constant effort is made 
to keep heating systems in good working order. 

In August three C.E.T.A. personnel remained in the department. No additional C.E.T.A. employees are expected 
prior to 1979. 

Assistance was provided to the Tree Department by providing electrical service and wiring for the Christmas 
lights. Electrical assistance was also provided to the Water Department. 

Efforts continued to keep the athletic fields in good condition continued. Heavy and constant use make it 
difficult to keep these fields in first class condition at all times. 

My thanks to the personnel of the Public Buildings and Grounds Department for their outstanding work during 
the year and also thanks to those departments that provided assistance throughout the year. 




Band Concert at Gazebo 

46 



Housing Authority 



ORGANIZATION 

The Wilmington Housing Authority is authorized by Section 3 of Chapter 121 B of the General Laws, as amended. 

MEMBERS Mrs. Barbara H. Larson, Chairperson 

Mr. George W. Hooper, Vice Chairman 
Mrs. Lorraine C. Brozyna, Secretary 
Mr. Kevin J. McMillan, Treasurer 
Mr. Melvin F. Keough, Assistant Treasurer 
Mr. Henry E. Borrazzo, Executive Director 

STATUTORY REFERENCE 

1. Housing Authority Law: Section 261 of the General Laws, as amended. 

2. Act of providing Housing for Elderly Persons of Low Income: Chapter 667 of the Acts of 1954, as amended. 

BALANCE SHEET AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1978 - 667-1 



ASSETS 

Administration Fund 
Accounts Receivable 
Investments 
Prepaid Insurance 
Retirement 
Modernization Award 
Development Cost 
Less: Dev. Cost Liquidation 
Total Assets 



$ 7,111.49 
1,370.30 
14,663.17 
428.13 
269.73 
56,127.44 
575,000.00 
-135,000.00 
$ 519,970.26 



LIABILITIES 

Accounts Payable 
Employees' Payroll Deductions 
Grants Authorized 
Notes Issued 
Less: Notes Retired 
Modernization Grant 
Capital Reserve 
Operating Reserve 
Residual Receipts (Deficits) 
Total Liabilities and Reserves 



$ 



2,129.79 
281.27 
440,000.00 
135,000.00 
-135,000,00 
56,033.25 
17,027.19 
16,044.06 
(11,264.03 ) 
$519,970.26 



BALANCE SHEET AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1978 - 705-1 



ASSETS 

Administrative Fund - Cash 
Accounts Receivable - 667-1 
Prepaid Insurance 
Prepaid Retirement 
Development Costs 
Total Assets 



ASSETS 
Cash - General Fund 
Prepaid Insurance 
Prepaid Retirement 
Total Assets 



$ 5,766.63 
0.00 
326.16 
29.16 
162,005.80 
$ 168,127.75 



LIABILITIES 
Accounts Payable - 667-1 
Accounts Payable - Other 
Grants Authorized 
Prior Year Deficit 
Residual Receipts (Deficits) 
Total Liabilities and Reserves 



BALANCE SHEET AS OF DECEMBER 31, 1978 - Section 8 



$ 3,954.21 
17.60 

65.61 

$ 4,037.42 



LIABILITIES 

Withholding Taxes 
Accounts Payable - 667-C 
Prepaid Annual Contributions 
Unreserved Surplus 
Operating Reserve 
Project Account 
Cumulative HUD Contributions 
Interest Income 
Expenses Paid 

Total Liabilities and Reserves 



$ 289.12 
355.60 
180,000.00 
(6,290.79) 
(6,226.18 ) 
$168,127.75 



$ 78.75 
142.77 
7,904.00 
(61,612.36) 
0.00 
28,474.17 
32,997.83 
99.71 
(4,047.45 ) 
$ 4,037.42 



47 




During the year 1978, under the Chairmanship of Barbara H. Larson, the Wilmington Housing Authority was suc- 
cessful in proceeding with the installation of a water purification system and finalization of the constructi 
of a chloridation and septic system. 

The Housing Authority applied for an additional 110 units of elderly housing under Chapter 667. Unfortunatel 
due to the district that Wilmington was located in in competing for funds with such communities as Belmont, 
Cambridge, Woburn, Lexington and Somerville, the proposal was denied. Requests were made to Representative 
James R. Miceli to file legislation and take whatever action is necessary to regroup Wilmington into communi- 
ties comparable to its population and size. 

During 1979, continued action and efforts will be exerted by the Housing Authority to acquire additional unit 
of housing for elderly, handicapped, and other needy. 



Veteran's Agent 



Veterans' Services is governed by the General Laws of Massachusetts, Chapter 115, as amended, with strict 
compliance to this Chapter, the rules and policies of which govern the disbursement of aid. Benefits are foi 
the needy Veteran and his immediate family who have been subject to unforseen needs. Final approval of bene- 
fits comes from the Commissioner of Veterans' Services, Boston, Massachusetts. 

The balance for the first six months of 1978 from previous appropriation was $25,157.86. A balance of $3,94( 
remaining June 30, 1978. Total available funds beginning July 1, 1978, was $30,000. Total expended for aid 
to Veterans and their families for the entire year, 1978, was $30,170.40. 

Total reimbursement for 1978 from settled assignments and/or accident cases authorized by the Commissioner's 
Office was $1,904.00. Because 50% of the amount authorized by the Commissioner's Office is shared by the 
Town, the Town's share on assignment cases was $952.00. The total amount of $1,904.00 has been turned over 
to the Town Treasurer, and the Commonwealth has been notified so adjustments of any monies can be made befori 
State reimbursement to the Town. 

This department deals continuously with new and changing benefits and/or lawc pertaining to Social Security, 
V.A. Disabilities, Pensions, Compensations and G.I. Education or on the job t. aining, plus aiding applicants 
for S.S.I. , Unemployment due to strikes, shutdowns and lack of work, always hac an impact on expenditures. 
Case load varies from time to time. 

The appropriation for 1978 and six months of 1979 was $30,000, as voted at the Annual Town Meeting, a balanci 
of $23,055.45 forwarded for the first six months of 1979. 



48 



Council on Aging 



Many new programs and social services have been developed and implemented for the Wilmington Senior Citizens 
during the year of 1978. 

The Council on Aging, an eleven member board, its Coordinator and senior aide operate senior programs and 
maintain the senior citizen's drop-in center. This center has been donated by Mr. Mike DeMoulas of DeMoulas 
supermarkets. 1300 seniors utilize the drop-in center each month of the year. 

The CO. A. operates a mini-bus which is staffed by two part-time drivers. The bus service is operated out of 
the drop-in center and is utilized each month by 4-500 seniors for transportation to doctors, hospitals, 
social service agencies, hot-lunch site, senior center and various other appointments. 

The Wilmington senior citizens hot-lunch program has been operational for two full successful years. The 
dedicated staff of the North Intermediate School worked hard to provide nutritious meals and surprises for 
our seniors during the school year. During the summer months the staff of the Woburn Street School does a 
great job in preparing the meals for our seniors. During 1978 meals were served to seniors on site for the 
entire year and as usual our senior shut-ins received home delivered meals all year. 

A regular schedule of activities is available to Wilmington's seniors. They have included swimming at the 
Shawsheen Valley Technical High School, Whist parties, organized bowling, dance lessons, arts and crafts, 
socialization and walking programs. A weekly blood pressure clinic is also held at the drop-in center. 
Nurses for this service are provided free of charge from the Wilmington Board of Health. During the year there 
are also many lectures and discussions held by guest speakers at the drop-in center. These are designed to 
focus on areas of special interest to our senior population. 

The year also brought about the development of an on-going nutrition program and an exercise program was 
developed for our senior citizens. The nutrition program ran for several weeks and helped to explain the 
variation in nutritional needs for seniors, purchasing of foods, exercises to keep fit, and the instructor 
shared a variety of nutritious low cost receipts with the senior participants. 

Senior recreational trips sponsored by the Council this year have included a bus trip to the Quincy Market, 
a Sweetheart's Ball, New Hampshire Flower Show, the Chateau de Ville dinner theater, Red Sox game, June 
dinner dance, a cruise to Provincetown, attendance at the third annual Salisbury Beach Day, a trip to the 
Eastern States Exposition, and a Halloween and Christmas Party. 

The Council on Aging pays annual dues and is serviced by the Minute Man Home Care Corporation. The M.M.H.C. 
offers assistance to our seniors with homemaker services, chore work, legal program, medical transportation 
to suppliment our mini-bus operations and information and referral services. Minute Man has just recently 
opened a new nutrition site in North Woburn which serves seniors from the North Woburn and Wilmington areas. 
One of our Council on Aging members, Mrs. Nema Miller is on the M.M.H.C. Board of Directors and Mr. Edward 
MacDonald, serves as an alternative director. 

Our Social Service programs have been increased during the year and include, the Friendly Visiting Associa- 
tion, Dial-A-Friend , Sunshine Lady, personal counseling, assistance with filing for federal assistance pro- 
grams, the Vial of Life program and the development of a Widowed to Widowed program. These services have 
been developed with the cooperation of many local organizations including Mystic Valley Mental Health, other 
local Councils on Aging, our own Board of Health and volunteers from our community. 



49 



Dedicated volunteers have played a major role in the success of our programing. They have been involved in 
training programs, assisted in idea development and have worked with much determination within their specific 
volunteer areas. 

Other basic services offered by the Council on Aging have included senior registration, distribution of dis- 
count cards, the school system's gold card program, and information and referrals for clients needs. 

It has been a year of generosity and giving from our community people, organizations, churches, merchants and 
industries. This has included them giving special parties and dinners to our seniors, many special discounts 
on merchandise and donations to our senior citizens. This was also a year of special consideration given to 
our senior shut-in population with many gifts, visits and merchandise donated especially for these seniors. 

It has been a very successful year with much community support and interaction. Our seniors have appreciated 
the special considerations shown to them by the community, and our special thanks is extended to all who have 
helped us and to the townspeople who have appropriated the budget which has made the operations of the Council 
on Aging possible. 



Redevelopment Authority 



The Wilmington Redevelopment Authority was pleased to greet a new member, Harry Allen, who joined the Board in 
March 1978. 

The Board is appreciative of the valuable contributions made by Sidney Kaiser and is sorry to see him leave 
after so many years of dedicated service to the Town of Wilmington. 

Harwich Chemical Company, who purchased 2.75 acres of land in the park, has completed their building and is 
now in operation. They employ in the vicinity of twelve people. 

Altron, Inc. found it necessary to expand their building to nearly double its present size and anticipates the 
hiring of approximately two hundred more employees. 

The WRA's goal for 1978 was realized in seeing the subsurfacing of Jewell Drive which they believe will attrac 
prospective buyers for the remaining lots in the development. 



50 



Recreation Committee 



Recreation is playing an increasing role of importance in the service function of municipalities everywhere. 

People are in need of a variety of activities that present a challenge, or an opportunity for accomplishment, 
satisfaction or just plain fun. 

Leisure patterns are in constant evolution. Keeping pace with these changing demands provide the Recreation 
Department with an exciting challenge. 

The following departmental objectives guide us in our efforts: 

To provide opportunities for self expression 
To develop a sense of personal worth 

To provide activities that allow for personal achievement and accomplishment 
To provide activities that are fun and enjoyable 

To provide physical activities which are new and different, offering a certain amount of challenge to 
participants 

To teach skills in various activities that will have carry-over in later life 

To provide a healthful and diversified program of recreation activities in an attempt to meet the needs 
and interests of the people being served. 

The Recreation Department, in its eighth year with a full-time director, presents the following information 
on 1978 programs and activities: 

YOUTH PROGRAMS 

Summer Playgrounds : The playgrounds of '78 again registered approximately 2,000 youngsters between the ages 
of 6 and 12. The seven school playgrounds ran for a seven week period on a Monday through Friday basis from 
9:00 to 3:00 p.m. each day. Each playground was staffed by three leaders and a Neighborhood Youth Corps aide. 
Individual playgrounds were responsible for planning and implementing a wide variety of recreational activi- 
ties for their registrants. Included as part of each playground's program were: arts and crafts, drama, 
interplayground competition, tennis, field trips, special events, family night cookouts, sports and games, 
tournaments and pool days. Arts and crafts as presented by the specialist in that medium was, as always, a 
popular activity. Special events included the Knights of Columbus Soap Box Derby and Olympics, Croquet Open, 
Horseshow Tourney, Tennis Tourney, Police Association Beach and Swim Day, a Penny Carnival at the Wildwood 
Playground with proceeds going to the Jimmy Fund, Sons of Italy Field Day at Rotary Park, Whiffle Ball tourney 
and the "Little Red Wagon" a touring drama show twice thrilled crowds on the Common. Because of a tremendous 
amount of volunteer and financial support by citizens and civic groups, this unique program as always was well 
received by the entire town. 

Tiny Tots : This pre-school program, in its second summer of operation, proved to be extremely popular. The 
Buzzell School served as the location for the program which consisted of two, three week sessions. Within 
each session there was a morning class and an afternoon class. Each session met each day for the three week 
period. Activities included many kinds of games, songs, skits, arts and crafts, special events such as 
Italian Festival, t-shirt day, ice cream soda day, crazy hat day, shamrock fun day and Chinese New Year. 
There were field trips to the public library, fire station, Children's Museum, Stoneham Zoo, Drumlin Farm 
and the Worcester Science Center. The highlight of the program was graduation day where all the tots received 
their own diploma. 

The most successful cookout of the entire summer took place at Silver Lake on August 14 with over 250 proud 
tiny tots, parents and friends enjoying the pony rides and other fun games. This program received a very high 



51 



level of success which can be attributed to many hours of planning and a competent and dedicated staff, 



Special Needs : For the fourth year in succession we were fortunate in that we were allowed to use the facil 
ties at Camp 40 Acres for this program. The program was staffed by thirteen supervisors and leaders plus 
Neighborhood Youth Corps personnel and many volunteers. The youngsters were supervised almost on a one on om 
basis because of the large assistance we are fortunate enough to have. This program, like the playgrounds 
ran for seven weeks from Monday through Friday. Their operating times were 9:00 a.m. to 2:00 p.m. Some of 
the many activities at the Camp included: arts and crafts, drama, field trips, pool days, active and quiet 
games, family cookouts, overnight camping and physically corrective activities in the North Intermediate Scho 
Gym. Special events included participation in the Playground Olympics and Beach Day, Kiwanis Club Cookout, 
family night supper and awards at the K of C Hall plus the conducting of our third annual Super Stars Competi 
tion sponsored by the Tewksbury-Wilmington Elks and participated in by 8 surrounding towns. This program is 
50% reimbursable from the Commonwealth. 

Teen Center : This summer marked the fourth year of this program for local teens. The Walker School was agaii 
utilized as the Center with the downstairs being used as a lounge, and the two main floor classrooms being 
used as game rooms. The Center ran for 6 and a half weeks on a Monday to Friday basis. Over 400 youths in 
grades 7 to 12 participated in the program which consisted of active and quiet games, tournaments, dances, 
swimming at the Shawsheen Tech Pool and field trips to places such as Hampton Beach, Mt. Monadnock, Wal-lex, 
Tea Men, Paragon Park, Fenway Park, Whalom Park, and to the movies. A final cookout was held at Asbury Grove. 

Baseball : Local boys between the ages of 15 and 18 made up our Northeast Baseball League team. The team 
played a 16 game schedule in an 8-team division within the league. During their season which ran from June 
through July all home games were played on the High School field. Coaches and managers for the team volunteei 
their services. 

Softball : During June, July and August, girls between the ages of 13 and 16 played Softball in our intra-towr 
league. Nearly 100 girls participated in this 4 team intra-town league. Games were played at the Town Park 
on Saturdays. The travelling team played in the 12 team Middlesex League with home games being played on 
Tuesday and Friday evenings at the Town Park. Wilmington hosted the League's All-Star Game on July 28. 
Girls ages 18 and over played as a team in the Northwest Suburban Softball League. Their home games were alsc 
played at the Town Park on Tuesday and Fridays. 

Eight team of boys, ages 13 to 17, formed our intra-town "one pitch" league. Over 100 boys participated. 
Their games were played on Saturdays at the Town Park. All of the many fine coaches in our leagues served as 
volunteers . 

Town Beach : Parents as well as children made use of the Silver Lake beaches. Qualified lifeguards supervised 
the public beach seven days a week from June through Labor Day. The Town is fortunate to have such a valuable 
natural recreation asset within its borders. 

Swimming Lessons : The Recreation Department utilized the Shawsheen Tech Pool throughout the year for youth, 
Red Cross lessons, adult lessons and open swim, family swim and special occasions such as the Jr. Winter 
Carnival. Swimming Lessons were also held at Silver Lake. Classes there included beginners, advanced begin- 
ners, intermediate, water safety aide and advanced life saving. Over 200 youths were involved in these summer 
lessons. Our entire lesson programs is extremely beneficial as more and more people are becoming involved in 
water oriented recreation. 



i; 



Basketball : In its,f if teenth season, our winter league registered approximately 500 people from ages 9 

on up. There were 45 teams in the three youth divisions and men's divisions. Games during the season, which 
ran from December through March, were played on Wednesday and Thursday evenings plus most of the day on Satur- . 
day and Sunday. Nearly 100 volunteers served as coaches and officials for this winter league. 



Girls' teams practiced on Wednesday evenings from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. in the North Intermediate School Gym and 
Thursdays in the High School Gym. Women practiced in the same gym from 8:00 to 9:30 p.m. Boys' teams practic 
in the West Intermediate School Gym on Thursdays from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m., while the men practiced in that gym 
from 8:00 to 10:00 p.m. 



There were three clinics held for squirt boys (ages 9-10) held in December with plans for future girls clinics 
of the same type. 



Tennis Lessons : Our tennis lessons program proved to be an extremely popular program. There were four, three 
week sessions for local residents between the ages of 9 and up. The program ran from May through August with 



52 



approximately 250 people involved. This is a very popular and valuable life time sport. 



Gymnastics : There were three, eight-week sessions of girls gymnastics: spring, summer and fall. Girls ages 
4 through grade 12 participated in these programs. Over 400 girls learned basic and more advanced maneuvers 
by participating in this popular program. 

Baton: Our baton classes began in the fall with a 10 week session on Wednesday afternoons. Girls ages 4 
through grade 6 participated. The next session included classes on Saturday for pre-schoolers through 12. 

Soccer : Our two spring soccer teams for boys competed in the Middlesex Youth Soccer League. The A team for 
boys, ages 15 and under, played on Sunday while the B team, comprised of boys ages 13 and under, played on 
Saturdays. The season ran from April through mid- June with home games being played at the Shawsheen School. 

Elementary Open Gyms : The Shawsheen and Woburn Street School Gyms were open to grades 1 through 6 on Saturday 
mornings from January through March. A variety of active sports and games were available for the children. 
The gyms are usually filled to capacity during the open gym hours. 

Intermediate Open Gyms : Both the North and West Intermediate School Gyms were utilized by intermediate age 
students on Saturday afternoons from 1:00 to 4:00 p.m. Basketball, gym hockey and tumbling were available to 
participants. This program also ran from January through March. 

Bowling : This is an extensive school year program which runs out of Pleasure Lanes in North Reading. The pro- 
gram ran every weekday after school from early October through mid April. Included were grades 4 through 12. 
Each school and bowler participated once a week. Bowlers received bus transportation from their school to 
the lanes and back to the vicinity of each bowler's home, plus 2 strings of bowling, a bowling shirt, in- 
struction, supervision and a chance to win one of many trophies. A free field trip to Canobie Lake Park con- 
ducted in May for the bowlers. 

Santa's Workshop : Over 400 good little boys and girls visited Santa and his elves at their Workshop in the 
former Mildred Rogers School. Children were able to sit on Santa's lap and receive a color snapshot with 
Santa. They also received a candy cane, a helium filled Christmas balloon and a change to win prizes from 
under Santa's Christmas tree all free of charge. All donations received during the program were sent to Globe 
Santa. 

Dance Lessons : In the spring, students in grades 7 to 12 participated in a 10 week introductory Disco Dance 
course. There were two classes which met once per week in the North Intermediate Cafeteria. 

In the fall, another 10 week session, consisting of two more student classes was held in the North Cafeteria. 

Ski Lessons : This was a new self supporting program for boys and girls in grades 4 to 6. The program consis- 
ted of 5 Wednesday afternoon classes at Boston Hills in North Andover. Forty skiers of varying abilities took 
part in this very successful program. On the last day of class, races were held as was a little ski part in 
the lodge. 

Arts and Crafts : Special projects in arts and crafts was the theme for a seven week, Saturday morning program 
for grades 2 and 3. Each class was one and one half hours long. Some very imaginative and special creations 
came from the children involved. 

Others : The Recreation Department either sponsored or participated in the following programs for Wilmington 
youth: vacation programs, ski trips, dances, Jr. Winter Carnival, Celtics trips, Easter Egg Hunt, free public 
skating, Memorial K of C races, free throw competition, Horribles Parade and Student Government Day, and la- 
crosse clinic. 

ADULT PROGRAMS 

Men's Open Gym : Men, over 18, were able to participate in an informal gym program on Thursday evenings from 
8:00 to 10:00 p.m. in the West Intermediate School Gym. This program is usually well attended and runs from 
November through March. 

Basketball : Men competed in a separate league within the Basketball League. Their games played in the High 
School gym on Sunday, Monday, Wednesday and Thursday evenings. The season began in December and lasted 
through March. 



53 



Ladies Open Gym : Ladies, ages 18 and over, had the use of the North Intermediate Gym on Wednesday evenings 
from 8:00 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. Informal basketball was the activity provided. The program ran from early 
December through March. 

Co-Ed Volleyball : This popular co-ed adult program ran on Thursday evenings from 7:30 to 9:30 in the North 
Intermediate School Gym. The program ran from January through March and was well attended. 

Ladies Slimnastics : The classes ran from January to April on Tuesday evenings from 7:30 to 9:30 p.m. at the 
West Intermediate School. The ladies exercised to music, jogged, participated in informal competitive games 
and were given instruction in varied fields by professional teachers. 

Softball : A very active and successful men's Softball league was conducted over the summer at the Town Park 
This entire program is supervised and conducted by volunteers spending much valuable time to insure the con- 
tinued success of this program. 

Ladies participated in the Northwest Suburban Softball League team. Equipment was loaned to another group c 
ladies who managed an informal, intra-town league. 

Ballroom and Disco Dancing : Ten week sessions were held in the winter, spring and fall. The winter prograit 
consisted of three ballroom dance classes. The spring classes consisted of three ballroom and two disco. T 
fall classes consisted of four ballroom and one disco. 

Over 2,000 Wilmington residents have participated in our classes. 

Concerts : The Recreation Department organized the first summer concert series on the new gazebo. There 
were four summer concerts featuring big band music, jazz, country and banjo sounds. 

Sponsors were: DeMoulas, Compugraphic , Fred F. Cain, Inc., Bedell Brothers, Ins., W. Leavitt and Son, Ins., 
Chamber of Commerce, Sweetheart Plastics and Wilmington Ford. 

Others : Additional adult programs involving the Recreation Department were: men's ice hockey, ladies bowli 
Memorial K of C races, swimming lessons, use of the Town Park and beaches plus various field trips. 

COMMUNITY YOUTH 

Several youth organizations in town received partial financial support through the Recreation Department bud) 
These excellent programs are run by interested volunteers who devote their time in helping our younger peopl 
receive enjoyment through recreation activity. These organizations are Youth Hockey, Figure Skating Club, 
Pop Warner, Senior Little League, Pony League, Soccer and Tennis Club. 

There has been increasing demand for the use of existing recreation facilities in the town. Over the past 
few years the Recreation Commission has been developing a plan for improving this situation. A plan for a 
new outdoor multi-purpose, recreation facility was presented to a Special Town Meeting on Monday, December 1 
1978. Although the Town had received assurance of 50% reimbursement from the federal government, the plan 
was turned down. New avenues or approaches to solving this facility problem will surely be explored. 




Police Association Sponsors Beach Day 



54 



Town Counsel 



In accordance with the requirements of the Town By-Laws, I submit herewith my report as Town Counsel covering 
the year 1978. 

(a) On January 1, 1978, there were pending the following actions by or against the Town (exclusive of 

actions in which the Town was merely summoned as trustee, and in which it had no interest, and of tax lien 
foreclosure proceedings in the Land Court and petitions for abatement before the Appellate Tax Board*) . 

Beatrice G. Swenson v. Town of Wilmington, etal, Middlesex Superior Court (petition for assessment of 
damages for land taking) . 

Harvey Lobdell v. Board of Appeals, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition in equity for appeal for variance 
by Zoning By-Laws) . 

II j Androniki Gaglione v. Thomas B. Brennan, etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of 
damages) . 

Joseph Scaro, etal v. County of Middlesex etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of 
damages for land taking) . 

John E. Hayward, etal v. County of Middlesex, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment 
of damages for land taking) . 

John E. Hayward, etal v. County of Middlesex, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of 
damages for land taking) . 

Hillcrest Realty, Inc. v. A. Daniel Gillis, etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Appeal of decision of Planning 
Board denying approval of definitive subdivision). 

Robert Stevens, Tr. v. Town of Wilmington and Planning Board, Land Court (Petition for registration and 
claim to Swain Court - Private Way) . 

Town of Wilmington v. Frank C. Powers, etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for contempt for failure 
to comply with final decree). 

Richard D. Zambernardi, etal v. Town of Wilmington Board of Selectmen, Middlesex Superior Court (Suit 
in equity for declaratory judgment to determine the validity of betterment assessment). 

Town of Wilmington v. Oxford Associates, Inc., Middlesex Superior Court (Claim to recover motor vehicle 
excise taxes) . 

Harry S. Sukeforth, etals, Trs. v. Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Peti- 
tion for assessment of damages) . 

Else M. Lanois v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of damages for 
land taking) . 

55 



Sanborn Brothers, Inc. v. Town of Wilmington, District Court of Lowell (Action for property damage - 
negligence) . 

Stepan Chemical Co. v. Town of Wilmington, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Bill of complaint for declar 
tory relief as to the validity of a sewer betterment assessment) . 

Stepan Chemical Co. v. Town of Wilmington, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Bill of complaint for declar 
tory relief as to the validity of assessment of sewer use charges, for recovery of damages and for injunctive 
relief) . 

George Anderson, etal v. Town of Wilmington, etal, Fourth District Court of Eastern Middlesex (Claim for 
personal injury). 

School Teacher v. The Wilmington School Committee, Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (Complaint on 
discrimination as to benefits) 

John J. Lyons, etal v. Town of Wilmington, Land Court (Complaint to determine validity and extent of the 
zoning by-laws of the Town of Wilmington). 

George W. Lloyd, etal v. Jackson Brothers, Inc., etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Complaint for alleged 
damages resulting from diversion of water) . 

James Zaccagnini v. James Marsi, Middlesex Superior Court (Complaint alleging libel by police officer in 
the performance of his duties) . 

Edward W. Powers, etal v. Town of Milton, etal, Supreme Judicial Court (Declaratory judgment to determin 
constitutionality of Civil Service Statute) . 

John D. Cooke v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of damages) . 

John V. Kunigenas, etals v. Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition fc 
assessment of damages). 

Stepan Chemical Co. v. Town of Wilmington, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for abatement of 
sewer betterment assessment) . 

Stepan Chemical Co. v. Town of Wilmington, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for abatement of 
sewer use charge) . 

Donald C. Eaton, etal v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of 
damages for land taking) . 

Rosaline T. Abi-Ezzi v. Wilmington School Committee, etal, Massachusetts Commission Against Discriminati 



(Claim for payment of maternity benefits), 

Robert E. Casey, etal v. Bruce MacDonald, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Appeal from decision of the 
Board of Appeals). 

Marie Mack v. Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment 
of damages for land taking) . 

Austin L. Rounds v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment of damages for 
land taking) . 

Joseph J. Salpietro, etal v, Robert E. Shelley, etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Claim for personal in- 
jury and property damage) . 

Alice Papaliolios v. A. Daniel Gillis, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Complaint for invasion of privac; 
and defamation). 

Town of Wilmington v. Richard Anderson, Middlesex Superior Court (Bill to vacate award of Board of Concl 
iation and Arbitration) . 



56 



Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational Technical School District Committee v. Town of Wilmington, etals , 
; Middlesex Superior Court (Suit to recover alleged deficiency appropriation plus penalty). 

Donald Robbins, Trustee v. A. Daniel Gillis, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Petition for assessment 
of damages) . 

James Zaccagnini v. Sterling C. Morris, etals, U.S. District Court of Massachusetts (Suit alleging 
violation of plaintiff's civil rights). 

Town of Wilmington v. Rosnoe Construction Corp., etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Action to restrain the 
removal of soil, loam, sand or gravel from defendant's premises). 

Gibbs Realty and Development Corporation v. Bruce MacDonald, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Appeal from 
decision of Board of Appeals denying building permit) . 

Frank T. Mack, etal v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Claim for personal injury and prop- 
erty damage resulting from alleged street defect) . 

James Rooney v. Town of Wilmington, Civil Service Commission (Appeal from decision of appointing authority) . 

Lawrence H. Cushing, Jr., etal v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Claim for land damage 
resulting from taking for town forest) . 

Doris Mattucci v. Anthony E. Krzeminski, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Certiorari v. Board of Assessors 
after partial denial of Clause 18 Exemption). 

Frances Dec v. Town of Wilmington, etal, Massachusetts Commission Against Discrimination (Complaint al- 
leging sex discrimination) . 

*There are pending as of January 1, 1979, 46 separate petitions for abatements before the Appellate Tax 
|Board, many involving claims for several different years. 

(b) (1) During the year 1978, the following new actions were brought against the Town of Wilming- 

ton or its officers or agents: 

Dorothy A. Cosman v. Town of Wilmington, etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Claim for personal injury) . 

Estate of Maurice R. Flynn v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Complaint for assessment of 
damages) . 

Wilmington Town Employees Association, Inc. and Town of Wilmington, American Arbitration Association 
I (Demand for arbitration of contract provisions). 

Doris Mattucci v. Marion Murphy, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Complaint/Injunction). 

Bureau of Special Education Appeals Hearing, Special Needs Student v. Town of Wilmington (Determination 
jof adequate and appropriate educational plan) . 

Doris Mattucci v. Anthony E. Krzeminski, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Certiorari v. Board of Assessors 
after partial denial of Clause 18 Exemption) . 

Fosters Pond Improvement Association, Inc., etals v. Aldo Caira, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Action 
in the nature of certiorari for decision of Board of Selectmen granting earth removal permit) . 

Ralph D. Peterson v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Complaint for assessment of damages) . 

Ruth J. Gronemeyer, Exec, v. George R. Allan, etal, Middlesex Superior Court (Complaint for assessment 
;of damages) . 

James Rooney v. Sterling C. Morris, etals, Municipal Court of the City of Boston (Appeal from decision 
of Civil Service Commission sustaining appointing authority) . 

Special Needs Student v. Town of Wilmington, Bureau of Special Education Appeals Hearing (Determination 
of adequate and appropriate educational plan) . 

57 



John Earl Dick, etal v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Complaint for assessment of damages 

Wilmington Town Employees Association, Inc. and Town of Wilmington, American Arbitration Association 
(Demand for arbitration of contract provisions) 

Traffic Supervisors (AFSCME, Council 93) and Town of Wilmington, Labor Relations Commission (Mediation 
and fact finding). 

IBPO, Local 318 and Town of Wilmington, American Arbitration Association (Demand for arbitration of con- 
tract provisions). 

Bette Brooks, etals v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Complaint for assessment of damages 

(b) (2) During the year 1978, there were no new actions brought by or on behalf of the Town. 

(c) During the year 1978, the following actions by or against the Town were finally disposed of. 

Hillcrest Realty, Inc. v. A. Daniel Gillis, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Disposed of by judgment of 
dismissal) . 

Wilmington Town Employees Association, Inc. and Town of Wilmington, American Arbitration Association 
(Disposed of by denial of grievance) . 

James Rooney v. Town of Wilmington, Civil Service Commission (Disposed of by decision of appointing 
authority affirmed). 

John V. Kunigenas, etals v. Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington Middlesex Superior Court (Disposed of 
by satisfaction of execution of the Court in the amount of $8,000 in addition to pro tanto sum paid). 

Doris Mattucci v. Anthony Krzeminski, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Disposed of by stipulation for 
dismissal) . 

Doris Mattucci v. Marion Murphy, etals, Middlesex Superior Court (D isposed of by motion of the plaintiff 
for voluntary dismissal with prejudice). 

Special Needs Student v. Town of Wilmington, Bureau of Special Education Appeals (Disposed of by agree- 
ment - student accepting educational plan ratified by decision of Bureau) . 

Austin L. Rounds v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Disposed of by satisfaction of executit 
of the Court in the amount of $1,000 in addition to pro tanto sum paid). 

Donald C. Eaton, etal v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Disposed of by satisfaction of 
execution of the Court in the amount of $3,000 in addition to pro tanto sum paid). 

Maurice R. Flynn, Jr., Exec, of Est, of Maurice R. Flynn v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court 
(Disposed of by satisfaction of execution of the Court in the amount of $500.). 

Robert E. Casey, etal v. Bruce MacDonald etals, Middlesex Superior Court (Disposed of by modifying decis- 
ion of the Board of Appeals). 

Ralph E. Peterson v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Disposed of by satisfaction of execu- 
tion of the Court in the amount of $450. in addition to pro tanto sum paid). 

John D. Cooke v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Disposed of by satisfaction of execution 
of the Court in the amount of $1500. in addition to pro tanto sum paid) . 

Lawrence H. Cushing, Jr. , etal v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Disposed of by satisfact: 
of execution of the Court in the amount of $27,500.). 

Marie Mack v. Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Disposed of by satisfactic 
of execution of the Court in the amount of $5,000. in addition to pro tanto sum paid). 

Frank T. Mack, etal v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Disposed of by satisfaction of 
execution of the Court in the amount of $750.). 



58 



Doris Mattucci v. Anthony E. Krzeminski, etal v. Middlesex Superior Court (Disposed of by voluntary 
dismissal) . 

Special Needs Student v. Town of Wilmington, Bureau of Special Education Appeals (Disposed of by finding 
of Bureau for private placement of pupil) . 

John Earl Dick, etal v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Disposed of by satisfaction of 
execution of the Court in the amount of $30,000. in addition to pro tanto paid). 

Town of Wilmington v. Richard Anderson, Middlesex Superior Court (Disposed of by judgment revoking de- 
cision of Labor Relations Commission, plaintiff waiving claim for reinstatement and payment of $5,000 for loss 
wages) . 

Bette Brooks, etal v. Town of Wilmington, Middlesex Superior Court (Disposed of by satisfaction of execu- 
tion of the Court in the amount of $8,000. in addition to pro tanto paid). 

IBPO, Local 318 and Town of Wilmington, American Arbitration Association (Disposed of by award of arbitra- 
tor determining the grievance not to be arbitrable under the terms of the Collective Bargaining Agreement) . 

Shawsheen Valley Regional Vocational Technical School District Committee v. Town of Wilmington, etals, 
Middlesex Superior Court (Disposed of by payment of deficiency of appropriation in the amount of $85,000.). 



Constable 



During the year the following notices and warrants were posted: 



Event 


Posted 


Date 




Town Meeting 


5 places 


February 2, 


1978 


State Primary 


6 places 


September 1, 


197 


State Election 


6 places 


October 18, 


1978 


Special Town Meeting 


6 places 


December 1 , 


1978 



fie have also served and posted notices for the Town and other of its officers and departments. 



59 



Historical Commission 



Preserving and protecting Wilmington's past has been the prime concern of the Historical Commission, and to 
that end, positive steps have been made this year. Over fifty of Wilmington's historical assets survey re- 
ports, as prepared by Brian Pfeiffer with the assitance of Adele Passmore, were filed with the Massachusetts 
Historical Commission. This is the first group of reports to be fully completed and filed, and with many 
houses still remaining to be included in the survey, this work will be an ongoing project for the Commission 
in 1979. 

c 

The Commission is pleased that through the efforts of Rep. Jim Miceli and other interested persons, a matching 
grant was made available to the Town of Wilmington from the Massachusetts Arts and Humanities Program, enabliij' 
the restoration of the Butters' Farm painting. This extremely fine painting is now on display at Harnden 
Tavern, and it is hoped that everyone will take special note of the painting during visits to the Tavern, as 
it is an excellent portrayal of farm life in Wilmington during the 19th Century. 

A special note of thanks and praise to Roy McClanahan and his men at the Public Building Maintenance Dept. fo: 
the fine job done on the roof of Harnden Tavern. Restoration began in June, and by the end of the summer, a 
new cedar shingle roof was beginning to "weather'' nicely. 

Again this year, the Commission has worked closely with "The Friends of Harnden Tavern," co-sponsoring several ■ 
events at the Tavern. Once more the weather cooperated and a lovely snowfall the night before insured the 
success of the February sleigh ride. This event, combined with several other programs throughout the year, 
and culminating with a wonderful old-fashioned Crhistmas party, has enabled the Friends to add to its collec- ■ 
tion of furnishings now on display at the Tavern. 

A pilot program has been initiated by the Historical Commission and the Friends to have the Tavern open on th< 
first Sunday of each month. Members will be on hand to guide visitors through the house and acquaint them 
with some of its fine architectural features, as well as a bit of Wilmington history. It is hoped that many 
of the townsfolk will use this opportunity to investigate this unique antique house. 

Young and old alike have enjoyed benefit from the Tavern this year. At the request of the Walker School 
Mother's Club, and through the combined efforts of that group and the Historical Commission, an entire day of . 
fun and learning was prepared for the youngsters. Grades 1 and 2 arrived in the morning and were given a tou 
of the building, complete with demonstrations of early hearth cooking. After the tour, a nature walk around 
the Tavern grounds was conducted for some of the children, while on the lawn others played Colonial games or- 1 ., 
ganized through the kindness of Mrs. Ruth Filipowicz. At noon grades 3 and 4 arrived, and all enjoyed a pic- 
nic lunch, after which the morning group returned to the school, and the entire program was repeated in the 
afternoon. The day was an overwhelming success enjoyed by all participants. The Historical Commission is j .. 
pleased to have been able to provide this day for the Walker School children, as well as the several other 
school and youth groups who availed themselves of the Town's museum facility this year. 

Cast and cameras were plentiful several Sundays in a row this summer, when a more unusual use of Wilmington's 
antique house took place. A student from Wilmington High School filmed portions of his production of "1776" 
at the Tavern, using the grounds, as well as the house itself, as background for his film. 

New this fall to the scheduled events at the Tavern was a tea given by the Commission for Wilmington's senior 
citizens. Over 75 people shared pots of tea in the congenial atmosphere provided by the Tavern's glowing 
fires and Georgian panelling, and we look forward to making this tea an annual event. 

In September the Commission welcomed three new members: Mrs. Ruth Harding, Mrs. Evelyn Kaminski and 

Mr. Herbert Fielding. These new members, along with Melinda Murphy, Frank Curley, Foster Balser and 

Bill Meyer, look forward to a productive 1979 with an eye toward 1980 and the 250th Anniversary of our Town. i. 

Plans are in the making for special programs and events, and the Historical Commission will be working hard t 

ensure an especially memorable 250th Anniversary for Wilmington's citizenry. 



60 



Board of Health 



Thomas Morris was elected Chairman of the Board of Health for the period 1978 - 1979. Joseph Paglia and James 
Durkee comprise the other two Board Members. Luis Francisco resigned as Board of Health physician as a result 
of his relocation in another state. 

... Many new programs were instituted during 1978. 

... Two programs were held jointly with the Regional Health Center; one for a Flu Clinic, the other for the 
administration of the Pneumonia Vaccine. There was no cost to the Town. 

... A rabies immunization program was held June 10, 1978, at the Highway Garage. 

... A preventive dental program was maintained by the Board of Health in the school system. 

... The part-time physiotherapist was terminated. This service, however, is now being provided by the Combined 
Nurses Association at no cost to the Town. 

... A Gentle Exercise Program was introduced for senior citizens. 

... The Board continued to fund Wilmington Family Counseling. 

... A Nutritional Program was initiated at the Drop-In-Center. 

. . . The Board retained the services of Share. This program received a great deal of support in the school 
system. 

... A special inoculation clinic was held with the school nurses in an effort to comply with the school im- 
munization law. 

. . . Blood pressures were taken by the Public Health Nurses at the Library and various drug stores during the 
designated Hypertension month of May. 

... The Board again participated in Good Government Day. Thomas Morris, Chairman of the Board of Health, 
accompanied the group to the F.D.A. Winchester Laboratory and also toured H.P. Hood Company. 

... During the September primaries and the November election, the Public Health Nurses were located adjacent 
to the polling area taking blood pressures. 

. . . The Director was reelected to the Executive Board of the Massachusetts Health Officers Association. 

... Two years of the three-year rubbish collection contract was completed in 1978. 

... The Board recinded one provision of its sewerage regulations. The State Code will be enforced in its place. 
... Mystic Valley continued to provide mental health service to the Town. 
A. COMMUNICABLE DISEASE 

1. Monthly Immunization Clinic Attendance 63 

61 



A. COMMUNICABLE DISEASE (Continued) 

Home visits 19 

Office visits 143 

2. Tetanus/Diphtheria Booster Clinic Attendance (high school seniors) 139 

3. Special Immunization Clinic for School Children in High School Attendance 1,082 

4. Flu Immunization Program Total doses administered 547 

5. Pneumonia Vaccination Program Total doses administered 229 

6. Communicable Diseases Reported 72 

7. Tuberculosis Report New cases reported 1 

Reactivated cases 2 

Death 1 

Home visits 37 

Office visits 134 

T.B. tests to seniors 139 

T.B. tests to children at Headstart 46 

T.B. tests to school personnel 141 

B. PUBLIC HEALTH NURSING 

1. Nursing visits during year 877 

Fees collected $192.50 

2. Premature births reported Reported 7 

Home visits . 12 

3. Newborn infants Home visits 18 

4. Hypertension Program Office visits 170 

Attendance at monthly clinic 184 

Town Employees 15 

Location at drug stores and library 176 

Location at polls on voting days 985 

5. Diabetic Screening Attendance at clinic 82 

Town Employees 14 
Fees collected $92.00 

6. Drop-In-Center Number of counseling sessions 47 

Attendance 775 

7. Gentle Exercise Program Number of sessions 29 

Attendance 454 

8. Nutritional Program at Drop-In-Center Number of sessions 4 

Attendance 91 

9. General Health Supervision Home visits 861 

C. ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH 

1. Licenses and Permits Sewerage 71 

Food 55 

Milk Store 44 

Milk Vehicle 2 

Stable 35 



62 



C. ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH 



1. Licenses and Permits (continued) Refuse transportation 25 

Installers 33 

Piggery 1 

Miscellaneous 22 
Fees Collected $2,853.00 

2. Food Establishments Permits issued 55 

Inspections 93 

Fees collected $275.00 

3. Complaints 317 

4. Inspection of Animals Animals quarantined 30 

Animals released 30 

Animals disposed of 384 

5. International Health Certificates 18 

6. Dental Clinic Number of children serviced 1,573 



7 . Bathing Samples 

The State discontinued the services of testing water samples. It became necessary to 
take bathing water samples to a private laboratory. All samples tested complied with 
standards . 

Samples collected 10 

8. Court 

The services of Simon Cutter were retained during the year. 

Court Appearances 6 

9. Solid Waste 

Browning Ferris completed two years of a three-year contract for the collection of 
refuse in Town. 

10. Subdivisions 

The Board processed four subdivisions. 

11. Sewerage Inspections/Investigations 356 

12 . Recreation Camps 

The Board of Health licenses two day camps in Town, Camp 40 Acres and Mill Brook 
Country Day Camp. 

13. Water Analysis Samples collected 3 

14 . Hospital Day 

The Board again participated in Hospital Day by sponsoring a hearing program at the 
New England Memorial Hospital. 

15. Housing Inspection 5 

16. Share 

a. Financial Summary: 

Share's total income, January 1 - December 31, 1978, is $667,842. during this same 12-month period, 



63 




16. Share (continued) 

Share actually expended $32,555.75 in services to the residents of Wilmington ($28,810.40 direct; 
$3,745.35 indirect). That is, 4.9% ($32,555.75 divided by $667,842) of Share's income went to 
Wilmington. Wilmington contributed $13,206.00 which is 1.9% of Share's income. For each dollar 
Wilmington contributed Wilmington citizens received $2.47 in services. 

b. Service Deliver Summary: 

During 1978, 195 Wilmington residents received counseling in either residential or outpatient treat- 
ment . 

The Anabasis House Program has seen 1 client from Wilmington for a total of 18 days. 

The Morningstar Counseling Program has counseled 55 youths and their families outside school from 
Wilmington for a total of 859 counseling weeks. 

The Emergency Shelter Program has housed 6 individuals from Wilmington in 1978. 
The Central Intake Program has housed 6 individuals from Wilmington in 1978. 

Morningstar Counselors have counseled 120 adolescents inside Wilmington High School and intermediate 
schools. These students have been usually referred by school department personnel because they have 
a problem with substance abuse or other adolescent adjustment issues. 

Other Share services include Psychiatric and Psychological Consultation which is provided by Dr. 
Margolis and Dr. Smith to the Wilmington Guidance Department and other town groups. 

Share, Incorporated, is a multimodality drug treatment and rehabilitation program serving the Greater Lowell f 
Area. Eligibility requirements vary with each division. For more information call the Central Intake Unit 
at 459-2306. 



17 . Wilmington Family Counseling Service, Inc. 

a. Clients: 

Number of families in treatment 

Average per month - 53.9 

Number of new families entering treatment 

Average per month - 5.2 

Number of families returning for further treatment 

Average per month - 2.8 



Contract 
98 



43 



20 



Other 
46 



19 



14 



Total 
144 



62 



34 



Primary presenting problems 

Adult with personal emotional problem 44% 

Marital problem 24% 

Child adjustment or management problem 17% 

Adolescent adjustment or management problem 9% 

Developmental Life Crisis 6% 

Number of families terminating treatment 63 
Average per month - 7.2 

Service: 

Number of scheduled counseling & therapy sessions 1172 

Number of group counseling & therapy sessions (3-6 members) 

(7-10 members) 



23 



479 



86 



1651 

9 
1 



Consultation and education services 
Specific agency or group 
Headstart Parents Meeting 
Mass. Rehabilitation Commission 



Service 

Community education 

Community information and planning 



64 



Wilmington Family Counseling Service, Inc. (continued 



Wilmington Public Schools Case Consultation 

Wilmington Regional Health Center Case Consultation 

Cost to Town per scheduled appointment: $10.50 
Decreased 34% from $14.10 in 1977 
Decreased 47% from $19.67 in 1976 

Number of scheduled counseling and therapy sessions increased 34% over 1977. 



Beautification Committee 



This past year has been an eventful one for the Beautification Committee. An official landscape plan for the 
Town Common was presented to and accepted by the Board of Selectmen. This will, hopefully, insure uniformity 
of future plantings on the Common. 

The flag pole area, phase I, will be planted this spring, as well as the gazebo area, phase II. It is our 
intention to concentrate our efforts on the Common for both a Winter Christmas display and summer enjoyment. 

Our committee looks forward to active participation in the planning of events for the 250th birthday celebra- 
tion of the Town of Wilmington in 1980. 

We welcome Cynthia White as a new member of our committee. 



Carter Lecture Fund 



On Thursday evening, April 13, 1978, the Committee presented Mr. William G. Sylvester on "SCOTLAND", and the 
program was well received. The School Department sponsored Mr. Sylvester on Friday morning for the High School 
Students. 

For 1979 the Committee will present "AN EVENING OF IRISH MUSIC" with Father Francis Strahan, tenor, and Mr. 
Kenneth Wilson, organist, at 8:15 on Friday Evening, March 16, at the United Methodist Church in Wilmington. 

Father Strahan and Mr. Wilson are both graduates of the New England Conservatory of Music. Father Strahan is 
Director of Music at St. John's Seminary in Brighton. Mr. Wilson has performed over 240 times at the Hammond 
Museum and Father Strahan has appeared there with him many times. 

The Sarah D. J. Carter Lecture Fund Committee cordially invites you to attend the programs which are given 
free to the residents of Wilmington. 



65 



Accepted Streets 



STREET 




LOCATION 


LENGTH 


DATE 


(s) ACCEPTED 


Adams Street 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Parker Street 


2,915 


1908 




Adelaide Street 


from 


Church Street to Middlesex Avenue 


666 


1976 




Aldrich Road 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 


6, 740 


1894 




Allen Park Drive 


from 


Fairmont Avenue to Fairmont Avenue 


2,319 


1971 




Andover Street 


from 


Salem Street 


180 


1894 




Andover Street 


from 


Andover Line to beyond Woburn Street 


11,300 


1894 


1970 


Anthony Avenue 


from 


Salem Street to Catherine Avenue 


300 


1966 




Apollo Drive 


from 


Charlotte Road to Draper Drive 


300 


1971 




Arlene Avenue 


from 


Salem Street to Ella Avenue 


3,754 


1966 


1978 


Auburn Avenue 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 


755 


1945 




Ayotte Street 


from 


Westdale Avenue to Crest Avenue 


240 


1947 




Baker Street 


from 


Brand Avenue to beyond Phillips Avenue 


684 


1945 




Baland Road 


from 


Ballardvale Street 


540 


1972 




Ballardvale Street 


from 


Salem Street to Route 125 


965 


1894 




Ballardvale Street 


from 


Route 125 to Andover Line 


12,000 


1894 




Bancroft Street 


from 


Liberty Street 


400 


1952 




Barbara Avenue 


from 


Anthony Avenue to Dorothy Avenue 


850 


1966 




Beacon Street 


from 


Church Street to Belmont Avenue 


970 


1915 




Beech Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue to Byron Street 


1,005 


1947 


■ 


Beeching Avenue 


from 


Cunningham Street to Faulkner Avenue 


440 


1959 




Belmont Avenue 


from 


Columbia Street to State Street 


980 


1933 




Benson Road 


from 


Radcliff Road to Tewksbury Line 


616 


1971 




Biggar Avenue 


from 


Salem Street to Ring Avenue 


1,282 


1975 




Birchwood Road 


from 


Shady Lane Drive 


1,197 


1952 




Birchwood Road 


from 


Judith Road 


400 


1953 




Boutwell Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue to Aldrich Road 


4,144 


1894 


1960 1971 


Brand Avenue 


from 


Bridge Lane 


510 


1933 


1943 


Brand Avenue 


from 


Baker Street to beyond Wisser Street 


950 


1933 


1943 


Brattle Street 


from 


Massachusetts Avenue to Garden Avenue 


1,066 


1945 




Brentwood Avenue 


from 


Woburn Street to Woodside Avenue 


1,017 


1938 




Bridge Lane 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 


455 


1894 




Bridge Lane 


from 


Main Street to beyond Brand Avenue 


754 


1894 




Broad Street 


from 


King Street 


1,377 


1954 




Burlington Avenue 


from 


Main Street to Burlington Line 


8,588 


1894 




Burnap Street 


from 


Grove Avenue 


1,145 


1953 




Burnap Street 


from 


Winchell Road 


484 


1945 




Burt Road 


from 


Cedar Street to beyond Water Street 


1,653 


1945 


1946 


Butters Row 


from 


Main Street to Chestnut Street 


3,577 


1894 




Buzzell Drive 


from 


Draper Drive to Evans Drive 


600 


1971 




Canal Street 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Burt Road 


1,505 


1939 


1955 


Carolyn Road 


from 


North Street to Marcia Road 


1,268 


1960 


1971 


Carson Avenue 


from 


Marie Drive to byond Hathaway Road 


1,017 


1961 




Carter Lane 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to beyond Norfolk Avenue 


1,411 


1957 




Catherine Avenue 


from 


Anthony Avenue to Arlene Avenue 


1,000 


1966 




Cedar Street 


from 


Burt Road to Harris Street 


687 


1945 




Cedar Crest Road 


from 


Pinewood Road to Judith Road 


1,100 


1963 





b6 



STREET 




LOCATION 


LENGTH 


DATE 


(s) ACCEPTED 


Central Street 


from 


Church Street to Middlesex Avenue 


552 


1950 






Chandler Road 


from 


Adams Street to Kelley Road 


400 


1957 






Chapman Avenue 


from 


Hathaway Road to Sheridan Road 


1,575 


1951 


1971 




Charlotte Road 


from 


Gunderson Road to beyond Apollo Drive 


859 


1971 






Chase Road 


from 


Hathaway Road 


297 


1953 






Chestnut Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue to Woburn Line 


11,480 


1894 






unurcn otreet 


from 


Main Street to Middlesex Avenue 


/■ OQQ 
H , ZO J 








Clark Street 


from 


Main Street to Church Street 


2,470 


1894 


1969 




Cochrane Road 


from 


Forest Street to Wabash Road 


800 


1947 






Columbia Street 


from 


Church Street to beyond Belmont Avenue 


1,150 


1908 


1933 




Concord Street 


from 


Federal Street to North Reading Line 


5,803 


1894 






Congress Street 


from 


Forest Street to Burlington Line 


977 


1939 






Cook Avenue 


from 


Main Street 


813 


1946 






Coolidge Road 


from 


Hathaway Road 


270 


1951 






Corey Avenue 


from 


Canal Street to Grand Street 


366 


1951 






Cottage Street 


from 


Main Street 


927 


1954 






Crest Avenue 


from 


Ayotte Street 


558 


1947 






Cross Street 


from 


Main Street to Lowell Street 


697 


1894 






Cunningham Street 


from 


Salem Street to Beeching Avenue 


1 , 44 / 


1944 


1953 


1952 


Cypress Street 


from 


Glen Road 


260 


1951 






Dadant Drive 


from 


North Street to North Street 


1,760 


1964 






Davis Road 


from 


Main Street 


500 


1952 






Dayton Road 


from 


Hathaway Road 


170 


1951 






Dell Drive 


from 


Burlington Avenue 


1,794 


1958 


1971 




Dobson Street 


from 


Glen Road to beyond Garden Avenue 


1,402 


1954 






Dorchester Street 


from 


Billerica Line 


1 , Zl4 


1951 






Dorothy Avenue 


from 


Arlene Avenue to Barbara Avenue 


1,490 


1960 






Draper Drive 


from 


Gunderson Road to Evans Drive 


1,560 


1959 


1971 




Drury Lane 


from 


Glen Road to School Street 


633 


1963 






Dublin Avenue 


from 


Main Street 


500 


1951 






Dunton Road 


from 


Nassau Avenue 


649 


1956 






Eames Street 


from 


Main Street to Woburn Street 


3,200 


1894 






Edward Road 


from 


Forest Street to beyond Baldwin Road 


450 


1947 






Ella Avenue 


from 


Arlene Avenue to Arlene Avenue 


1,043 


1978 






Elwood Road 


from 


Forest Street 


642 


1968 






Emerson Street 


from 


Faulkner Avenue to Oakwood Road 


590 


1951 






Englewood Drive 


from 


Kenwood Drive 


455 


1971 






Evans Drive 


from 


Gunderson Road to Draper Drive 


2,071 


1971 






Fairfield Road 


from 


Main Street 


1,299 


1946 






Fairmeadow Road 


from 


Nichols Street to Nichols Street 


TOO 

1 , 5LO 


195o 






Fairmont Avenue 


from 


Malloy Road 


952 


1971 






Fairview Avenue 


from 


State Street 


648 


1933 






Faneuil Drive 


from 


Massachusetts Avenue to beyond Harvard Avenue 


790 


1950 






Faulkner Avenue 


from 


Glen Road to Jacobs Street 


1,946 


1944 


1953 




Fay Street 


from 


Glen Road to Garden Avenue 


714 


1938 


1945 




Federal Street 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 


5,740 


1894 






Ferguson Road 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 


1,073 


1967 






Fletcher Lane 


from 


Kilmarnock Street to Morgan Road 


792 


1977 






Floradale Avenue 


from 


Burlington Avenue 


627 


1970 






Fordham Road 


from 


North Reading Line 


3,714 


1971 






Forest Street 


from 


Burlington Avenue to Aldrich Road 


4,100 


1894 


1976 




Franklin Avenue 


from 


Arlene Avenue to Arlene Avenue 


739 


1978 






Frederick Drive 


from 


Salem Street 


1,070 


1966 






Glen Road 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Main Street 


6,870 


1894 






Glendale Circle 


from 


Glen Road to Lawrence Street 


1,304 


1952 






Glenview Road 


from 


Suncrest Avenue 


365 


1959 






Gowing Road 


from 


Park Street to Marcus Road 


941 


1956 







67 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH 



DATE (s) ACCEPTED 



Grace Drive 
Grand Street 
Grant Street 
Grove Avenue 
Grove Street 
Gunderson Road 

Hamlin Lane 
Hanson Road 
Hardin Street 
Harnden Street 
Harold Avenue 
Harris Street 
Harvard Avenue 
Hathaway Road 

Hawthorne Road 
High Street 
Hillside Way 
Hilltop Road 
Hobson Avenue 
Hopkins Street 

Industrial Way 

Jaquith Road 
Jere Road 
Jones Avenue 
Judith Road 



from Shawsheen Avenue to beyond Melody Lane 

from Corey Avenue 

from Federal Street 

from Main Street to Lake Street 

from Reading Line 

from Marie Drive to beyond Evans Drive 

from Lawrence Street 

from Woodland Road 

from Aldrich Road to Jaquith Road 

from Main Street to Glen Road 

from Shawsheen Avenue to Reed Street 

from Burlington Avenue to Cedar Street 

from Main Street to River Street 

from Woburn Street to Evans Drive 

from Woburn Street 

from Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 
from Chestnut Street to Burlington Line 
from Suncrest Avenue 

from Pine Avenue to beyond Wisser Street 
from Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 

from Woburn Street to West Street 

from Shawsheen Avenue 

from Fairmeadow Road to Fairmeadow Road 
from Glen Road 

from Cedar Crest Road to Birchwood Road 



2,514 


1966 




815 


1952 




780 


1943 




4,147 


1910 




120 


1957 




1,506 


1959 


1966 


540 


1962 




838 


1969 




428 


1951 




600 


1895 




1,312 


1971 




806 


1945 




430 


1951 




3,270 


1951 


1953 




1971 




230 


1956 




3,585 


1894 




2,230 


1914 




364 


1959 




1,560 


1945 


1951 


3,051 


1894 


1972 


4,430 


1974 




1,398 


1938 


1949 


1,248 


1968 




717 


1940 




400 


1953 





1959 



1952 
1975 



1951 



Kelley Road 
Kendall Street 
Kenwood Avenue 
Kiernan Avenue 
Kilmarnock Street 
King Street 
Kirk Street 



from Chandler Road 

from Aldrich Road to Blanchard Road 

from Woburn Street to beyond Englewood Drive 

from Lowell Street to beyond Naples Road 

from West Street to beyond Morgan Road 

from Glen Road to Broad Street 

from Main Street 



923 
1,420 
1,725 

693 
1,840 
2,400 

575 



1957 
1945 
1970 
1958 
1894 
1940 
1951 



1971 



1945 



Lake Street 
Lang Street 
Laurel Avenue 
Lawrence Court 
Lawrence Street 
Ledgewood Road 
Lexington Street 
Liberty Street 
Lincoln Street 
Linda Road 
Lloyd Road 
Lockwood Road 
Longview Road 
Loumac Road 
Lowell Street 
Lowell Street Park 



from Main Street to Shawsheen Avenue 

from Bancroft Street 

from Parker Street to Molloy Road 

from Lawrence Street 

from Glen Road to Shady Lane Drive 

from Suncrest Avenue 

from Cunningham Street to Morningside Drive 
from Federal Street 
from Federal Street 

from High Street to beyond Pineridge Road 

from Main Street 

from Ballardvale Street 

from Middlesex Avenue 

from Drury Lane 

from Main Street to Reading Line 
from Lowell Street 



3,855 
409 
659 
728 

4,013 
383 
714 
740 
720 

1,760 

1,050 
977 
650 
510 
10,152 
580 



1894 
1952 
1950 
1956 
1956 
1959 
1974 
1943 
1943 
1950 
1951 
1957 
1959 
1963 
1894 
1908 



1978 
1957 



1958 



Mackey Road 
Magazine Road 
Magazine Street 
Main Street 
Marcia Road 
Marcus Road 



from Federal Street 

from Wisser Street 

from Taplin Avenue 

from Tewksbury Line to Woburn Line 

from North Street to beyond Carolyn Road 

from Gowing Road 



250 
320 
190 
21,387 
2,806 
2,315 



1943 
1973 
1973 
1894 
1962 
1958 



1971 



68 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH 



DATE (s) ACCEPTED 



Marie Drive 


from 


Woburn Street to beyond Gunderson Road 


1,525 


1961 


Marion Street 


from Burlington Avenue to beyond Clifton Street 


1,876 


1945 


Marjorie Road 


from 


Main Street 


1,392 


1951 


Massachusetts Avenue 


from 


Main Street to beyond Brattle Street 


810 


1945 


McDonald Road 


from 


Salem Street 


2,621 


1944 


Meadow Lane 


from 


Suncrest Avenue 


364 


1957 


Melody Lane 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Grace Drive 


245 


1966 


Middlesex Avenue 


from 


Main Street to Salem Street 


12,140 


1894 


Miles Street 


from 


Main Street to Hobson Avenue 


380 


1945 


Miller Road 


from 


Glen Road 


638 


1945 


Moore Street 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to beyond Wedgewood Avenue 


1,528 


1967 


Morgan Road 


from 


Kilmarnock Street 


653 


1977 


Morningside Drive 


from 


Lexington Street to Fairfield Road 


693 


1974 


Morse Avenue 


from 


Woburn Street to beyond Lawn Street 


1,360 


1939 


Mystic Avenue 


from 


Middlesex Avenue 


598 


1908 


Nassau Avenue 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Dunton Road 


1,566 


1946 


Nathan Road 


from 


Senpek Road 


1,057 


1971 


Nichols Street 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to Billerica Line 


3,801 


1894 


Nickerson Avenue 


from 


West Street 


953 


1947 


Norfolk Avenue 


from 


Carter Lane to Nassau Avenue 


537 


1954 


North Street 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Marcia Road 


3,515 


1945 


Nunn Road 


from Kelley Road 


214 


1965 


Oak Street 


from 


Salem Street 


355 


1951 


Oakdale Road 


from 


Short Street to Judith Road 


2,301 


1950 


Oakridge Circle 


from 


Gowing Road to Gowing Road 


1,730 


1958 


Oakwood Road 


from 


Main Street to beyond Emerson Street 


800 


1946 


Olson Street 


from 


Church Street 


122 


1957 


Park Street 


from 


Woburn Street to North Reading Line 


4,180 


1894 


Parker Street 


from 


Lowell Street to Blackstone Street 


2,000 


1907 


Patricia Circle 


from 


Dell Drive 


595 


1958 


Pershing Street 


from 


Federal Street 


720 


1943 


Phillips Avenue 


from 


Wild Avenue to beyond Baker Street 


1,519 


1946 


Pilling Road 


from Hathaway Road 


954 


1959 


Pine Avenue 


from 


Main Street to Hobson Avenue 


380 


1945 


Pineridge Road 


from 


North Street to Linda Road 


914 


1960 


Pineview Road 


from 


Cobalt Street to Adelman Road 


450 


1953 


Pinewood Road 


from 


Shady Lane Drive to Oakdale Road 


1,364 


1954 


Pleasant Road 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Linda Road 


750 


1962 


Powder House Circle 


from 


Middlesex Avenue 


710 


1954 


Presidential Drive 


from 


Boutwell Street 


826 


1977 


Progress Way 


from 


Industrial Way 


630 


1974 


Radcliff Road 


from 


South Street to Benson Road 


355 


1971 


Railroad Avenue 


from 


Clark Street 


650 


1909 


Redwood Terrace 


from 


Kenwood Avenue 


645 


1970 


Reed Street 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue to beyond Harold Avenue 


1,090 


1971 


Richmond Street 


from 


Main Street to Shawsheen Avenue 


1,800 


1973 


Ridge Road 


from 


Suncrest Avenue 


365 


1956 


Ring Avenue 


from 


Salem Street to Biggar Avenue 


1,150 


1975 


River Street 


from 


Massachusetts Avenue to Harvard Avenue 


453 


1962 


Roberts Road 


from 


Burlington Avenue to Burlington Avenue 


1,861 


1967 


Rollins Road 


from 


Marion Street to Fenway Street 


200 


1954 


Roosevelt Road 


from 


Boutwell Street to Swain Road 


1,980 


1946 


Route 62 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Salem Street 


3,343 


1958 


Royal Street 


from 


Salem Street 


1,043 


1951 


Salem Street 


from 


Tewksbury Line to beyond Ballardvale Street 


8,895 


1894 


Salem Street 


from North Reading line to beyond Woburn Street 


6,475 


1894 



69 



STREET 



LOCATION 



LENGTH DATE (s) ACCEPTE 



Scaltrito Drive 


from 


Salem Street 


785 


1974 


Cphnnl Q. f T & & F 
JLUUU1 ollccl 


f~ r om 


\t i Hn 1 _cov Ai7_mi_ f~ /~\ V\_nT/-\Y"»^H T\t"i iv^r T ono 
ri_.L_<J.-_cofc;A __V t: 11 lit: LU ucyULltl ULXlLy Ltd I It: 




1 Q1 C 


O <_ 1 1 1 > L ft. JAUdLi 




W11UWUUU OLlCCl LU IN d L I Id 11 IVUdU 


zou 


1 Q 71 


JCWCll RUdU 




LldLlldWdy J\LJ dU 


jUU 




1 Id LI y Lid lie ui ivc 


from 


L'llUUlcocA V c llLlt: LU LdwL cllLt _Ll ccL 


9 QftA 


17JU 


OllawbllccU rtvcllUc 


from 
rom 


U cy (J IIU i\-L t_ lid L LI _ LlccL LU DJ.-L-LcL-LL,d 1_ -Llle 


J. J. , OH 3 


1 AQA 


QViPrhTifn PI a r* o 
Ollci uuiii rx-.iL.t_ 


r rom 


C Vi _ T.T c nD Dn At/oni i _ 
O I Id Wo I It: oil r_V Cll Lie 


7 9^ 


±7 / J 


Sheridan Road 


from 


Woburn Street to Hathaway Road 


1,021 


1951 


Sherwood Road 


from 


Forest Street to Cochrane Road 


445 


1971 


C i ] irov T 'i 1.' i j Anonno 
OllV cl ijclrvC riv t: 1 1 Lit 


f r om 


Jjdr-C oLlccL LU UcXCcL .Uccu 


A ^ 
HDD 




Sprucewood Road 


from 


Shady Lane Drive 


690 


1952 


State Street 


from 


Belmont Avenue to Fairview Avenue 


315 


1933 


OLIUUL JAv till Lit; 


from 


LUWcll OtlccL 


QOft 
y\JO 


17JJ 


Suncrest Avenue 


from 


West Street to Ledgewood Road 


1,246 


1954 


Swain Road 


from 


Burlington Avenue to Forest Street 


2,290 


1922 


lal U rxOcta 


r rom 


Boutwell Street to Swain Road 




I7J0 


Taplin Avenue 


from 


Wisser Street 


AA1 


1 QAA 


Tap 1 in Avenue 


from 


Datcer o treet 


y uu 


1 QA A 

l7^D 


icinpxe _ ticcL 


from 


tnurcri _> tree t 




1 Q1 1 


inrusn i\oaa 


f rom 


Salem Street to Marie Drive 


Ann 


1 Q AT 
I70I 


Thur s ton Avenue 


from 


Church Street to beyond Kidder Place 




1 Q07 
I7U / 


Truman Road 


from 


Hathaway Road 


inn 




Unnamed Street 


from 


Salem Street to And over Street 


A7n 


I7J0 


Upton Court 


from 


And over S treet 


^nn 


1 ftQA 
IO74 


Veranda Avenue 


f rom 


Main Street 


8A7 




Virginia Road 


from 


Nor th Read ing Line to Nor th Read ing Line 


± , 1UJ 


1 Q SA 


WalKcl _ _lcct 


r rom 


* c 

Main Street 


A91 
4 Z. _> 


17JO 


Warren Road 


from 


Wightman Road to Tewksbury Line 


Q7 


1 Q ^A 


Washington Avenue 


from 


LiaiK oLreet to o tone o treet 




1 Q90 


WcDDcl DLlccL 


f r om 


Burlington Avenue 


677 


J. .7 U .7 


Wedgewood Avenue 


from 


Moore Street 


476 


1967 


West Street 


from 


Woburn Street to Reading Line 


8,372 


1894 


Westdale Avenue 


from 


West Street 


1,211 


1942 


Wicks Circle 


from 


Everett Avenue 


533 


1971 


Wightman Road 


from 


Warren Road to Tewksbury Line 


239 


1954 


Wild Avenue 


from 


Grove Avenue 


1,050 


1910 


Wildwood Street 


from 


Middlesex Avenue to Woburn Street 


5,290 


1894 


Williams Avenue 


from 


Main Street 


706 


1940 


Wilson Street 


from 


Federal Street 


760 


1943 


Wilton Drive 

m 


from 


Shawsheen Avenue 


1,151 


1966 


Winchell Road 


from 


Grove Avenue to Burnap Street 


193 


1945 


Wing Road 


from 


Woburn Street 


746 


1958 


Wisser Street 


from 


Main Street to Brand Avenue 


1,146 


1950 


Woburn Street 


from 


Andover Street to Woburn Line 


23,122 


1894 


Woodland Road 


from 


Lowell Street 


1,174 


1969 



1963 



1958 



1971 



1929 



1978 



1978 



70 



School Committee 



The School Committee of the Town of Wilmington herewith presents its report for the year 1978. The present 
membership of the committee is as follows: 

Lester E. White, Chairperson 
James D. Tighe, Vice Chairperson 
John D. Brooks, Secretary 
James A. Demos 
Philip A. Fenton, Sr. 
Linda T. McMenimen 




Wilmington opened its school classes this year on September 6, 1978, with a total enrollment of 4,614 
students. This figure is down 283 from last year's official enrollment of 4,897. 

ACCREDITATION 

The Administration and Staff at Wilmington High School have begun making plans for our next ten-year evalua- 
tion study by a visiting team from the New England Association of Colleges and Secondary Schools. This is 
scheduled to take place during the 1980-1981 school year. At this writing, a steering committee has been 
formed to develop communications ideas for conducting the required self-evaluation next year in advance of 
the visiting team. Over the past ten years Wilmington High School received short-term accreditation due to 
several notable deficiencies in the current school plant. A major two-phase renovation/conversion carried 
out during 1976-1978 by the School Committee has helped to ease the crowded conditions in some departments. 
Further redistricting of our elementary system next year should also help. Our current accreditation has 
recently been continued through June, 1980. 



71 



\ 



STAFF RECRUITMENT 

As in the five previous years, the number of qualified teachers applying for jobs greatly exceeded the limit 
number of positions available. The school administration received over 1,000 inquiries and applications fro} 
certified teaching personnel. A significant number of these inquiries were received from out of state 
universities. 

NATIONAL MERIT SCHOLARSHIP 

Again this year, one of our students, Gregory Pavelcak, was commended by the National Merit Scholarship Fourt 
ation for his outstanding achievement on the Preliminary Scholastic Aptitude Test. Gregory's achievement id 
source of pride to the Committee as well as to his teachers and parents. 

DECLINING ENROLLMENTS 

Following the extensive analysis of our actual and projected enrollments completed in 1977 by the Super inten 
dent of Schools, an attempt to design a major redistricting effort at the elementary level was initiated thi 
Fall under the leadership of two of our elementary principals-Joseph Connelly and Dolores Silva. Various 
alternatives were considered by the staff-committee and the Administration. On the final recommendation of | 
the Superintendent, the School Committee voted on December 13, 1978 to adopt a plan which will incorporate 
a portion of the current central district into the Wildwood and Woburn Street districts on a permanent basis 
This plan will allow the Swain School to be freed for other educational use. The Committee further approved 
a plan to utilize the Swain as a temporary High School Annex beginning in September of 1979. The Administra 
tion is currently developing plans to implement this transition. 

GIFTED AND TALENTED PROGRAMS 

The School Committee directed the establishment of an advisory Committee under the leadership of the Assis- 
tant Superintendent of Schools to study the initiation of plans and programs for our students who are certi- 
fied to be gifted and talented within certain educational definitions. 

The study committee is currently involved in studying classification and program delivery models. One ini- 
tial response was the establishment of a regional education model called Project Enterprise. This project, 
with prime regional leadership from the Merrimack Education Center (MEC) is designed to develop cooperative 
individual learning contracts for qualified students in grades 4-6. At this writing, 96 students are partic 
ipating under direction of seven task force teachers representing all elementary districts. 

RESIGNATIONS AND RETIREMENTS 

Requests for leaves of absence, resignations, and retirements were granted to forty (40) teachers for the 
following reasons: 



Leaves of Absence: 16 



Resignations : 24 



Personal 


2 


Personal 


2 


Sabbatical Leave (Semester) 





Retirement 


3 


Maternity Leave 


11 


Teach in Other Communities 


5 


Graduate Study 


2 


Continue Education 


2 


Temporary Relocation 





Family Responsibility 


1 


Family Responsibilities 


1 


Career Change 


3 






Reduction in Force 


1 






Counseled Out 









Teachers on Leave 


7 



(Who Resigned) 



Retirements 



The School Committee wishes to acknowledge the retirements of three outstanding educators who served our 
community with distinction as teachers and supervisors for a combined career total of over ninety years. 

Mr. Joseph P. Beaton retired after 31 years as a teacher and Department Chairman in Social Studies, Grades I 
12. He was active in the profession and committed to the task of making social studies interesting and at- 
tractive to all students. Mr. Beaton's warm, friendly nature endeared him to both his students and his 
colleagues. 



72 



Mr. Lawrence H. Cushing retired after a long and distinguished career as a teacher, coach, and Director of 
Physical Education and Athletics for the Wilmington Public Schools. Mr. Cushing was well known throughout the 
area and the State. His professional contributions to the improvement of league activities are legendary. He 
demonstrated a profound commitment to the physical safety and educational development of the children entrust- 
ed to his care. 

Ms. Helen B. Doherty retired after many years in the profession as a dedicated and talented teacher of young 
children. Her most recent years were spent as the teacher of our transition class here in Wilmington from its 
implementation in 1970 through this past year. Her compassionate and helpful personality touched the lives of 
hundreds of eager youngsters and helped to shape their development toward positive growth. 

The Committee wishes to take this opportunity to extend its sincere appreciation to all of these three fine 
professionals for their dedicated service to the youth of Wilmington, and wishes each a happy and healthy 
retirement. 

The Committee also wishes to acknowledge the retirement of Mrs. Helen MacKay from the position of cafeteria 
manager in our school system. Mrs. MacKay spent many years on our staff, the last sixteen as manager of the 
cafeteria at the North Intermediate School. Helen will be remembered fondly by the many students and staff 
members that she so ably fed, and also by the public for her work in organizing the cooking and service for so 
many of our student banquets. The Committee is grateful to her for her dedicated efforts and extends its 
best wishes for a long and healthy retirement. 

The Wilmington Public Schools were in operation 180 days beginning September 7, 1977 and ending June 21, 1978. 
The Committee held twenty-three (23) regular meetings, four (4) special meetings, sixteen (16) meetings rela- 
tive to collective bargaining, and one (1) public budget meeting for a total of forty-four (44) meetings for 
the year 1978. 

The Committee is grateful to the other Town Officials, other Town Departments, and to the citizens of 
Wilmington for their excellent cooperation and assistance during the past year. 




1978 Wilmington High School Graduation 

73 



■ 



Superintendent of Schools 



I am pleased to submit the Annual Report of the activities of the Wilmington Public Schools for the year 197l\ 

At the risk of neglecting to mention some important program or outstanding event which was a significant con- 
tribution to our school life, I will try to highlight some of the events and activities that took place durii| 
this past school year. 

WILMINGTON HIGH SCHOOL 

Maintaining good discipline continues to be a major goal. This year we issued a new student handbook listing . 
the rules of the school, thus reinforcing what has been said over and over. Our attendance in school con- 
tinues to be close to ninety-five percent annually, while skipping from class has declined. 

Group Guidance - A special program for ninth graders was developed last year and implemented this year. Guii 
ance counselors report that they are getting to know their students much faster and have more time for other 
students. The program explores with students the opportunities available at high school and how their inter- 
ests can usually be satisfied. If students indicate the interest and need, personal problems are also 
discussed. 

College Admissions - Over fifty percent of our students continue their formal education after high school, 
satisfy the ever increasing need for more information, a forty-page booklet entitled College Admissions: A 
Guide was written by Constance Skahan, one of our guidance counselors. Two special evening programs were he 
for parents on the subjects of college admissions and financial aid. 

Psychological Assistance - To help our teachers and guidance counselors become more aware of the problems 
associated with child abuse and the new law requiring the reporting of suspected child abuse, Mystic Valley 
Mental Health Center has been providing the high school with a clinical psychologist who is available for 
staff members to consult about the behavior of some of their students. Also, the clinical psychologist is 
being used to provide guidance counselors with a different perspective in dealing with their students. 

Special Awards - Two of our students, Elizabeth Bartlett and Donald Lombardi, attended a national convention 
in Kentucky with other students who were recognized for their outstanding academic achievement. A Wilmingto 
business, Polyvinyl Chemical Industries (a division of Beatrice Foods), sponsored these two students. 

Flexible Education Program - Three new programs were inaugurated this past year to better meet the challenge 
presented by students who are not succeeding in regular classes. These programs are: 

Consumer Orientation - a program combines both Mathematics and English in an interesting and practical manne 

English 9 - a program for 9th grade students who do not have confidence in their basic English skills. 

English 10 - a program for 10th grade students who do not have confidence in their basic English skills. 

Student Activity Program - The program is designed to meet the needs of students not involved in interscho- 
lastic athletics. Clubs range from interscholastic competion in mathematics, chess, and business skills to 
avocational interests including skiing, climbing, and drama. The Senior Class continued a class gift tradi-J 
tion that has spread throughout the nation. Their blood drive brought the number of pints donated at the 
high school close to 1,000 pints during the past four years. Many clubs compete in national and state pro- 
grams, including chess tournaments, Office Education Association convention, and Massachusetts State Drama 
Festival. 



74 



MATHEMATICS 



A new course, Everyday Math, has been introduced into the high school curriculum. A replacement for what used 
to be General Math I, this practical course provides emphasis on those skills to be encountered by students in 
their daily living. Some topics included are banking, shopping math, and tax calaculation. Basic skills are 
constantly reinforced through useful applications. A follow-up course, Advanced Everyday Math, is expected to 
replace General Math II next year. 

A voluntary evening course was offered in October to increase student readiness for the math sections of the 
Scholastic Aptitude Test. A subsequent offering for the Math Achievement Exams was held for three weeks in 
November to help interested high school seniors prepare themselves for these tests required of many college 
applicants who plan to pursue science, engineering, or math-related careers. 

CPR IN WILMINGTON SCHOOLS 

The Science and Health programs in Wilmington has taken an active role in Cardiopulmonary resusitation (CPR) 
training and education. Mr. Richard L. DeRose, Director of Science, and several of his staff members are 
trained CPR instructors and have thus far certified approximately 300 Wilmington High School students in the 
technique. 

In addition, Mr. DeRosa and one of his Health teachers, Mrs. Brenda O'Brien, have offered CPR courses to the 
school administration, Woburn Street PAC, and the Woburn Street teachers and staff. 

Recently Mr. DeRosa and Mrs. O'Brien have become certified CPR instructor trainers which will enable them to 
train others in the community as CPR instructors. 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE DEPARTMENT 

The total number of students taking a foreign language has reached an all time high with fifty percent of the 
high school population now enrolled in a foreign language. Although Spanish has taken over as the most popular 
language, many students are still taking French. An amazingly high percentage (ninety percent) of all juniors 
who take French IV or Spanish IV elect the fifth year of the language in their senior year. 

The Italian enrollment continues to increase at all levels. In the spring, an Italian Honor Society was formed 
Many students who study Italian are of Italian background and proudly tell how they are now able to speak to 
their parents and relatives in Italian. 

There are now language clubs and honor societies in all four languages: French, German, Italian, and Spanish. 
The Spanish and French honor societies are especially active and undertake a wide variety of activities each 
year. The Spanish Honor Society is currently planning a trip to Spain, and the French Honor Society is plan- 
ning a trip to France. 

HEALTH EDUCATION 

Last fall a Health Education Curriculum Adoption Committee was formulated under the direction of Mr. Richard ■ 
L. DeRose, Director of Science, K-12. The Committee consisted of teachers, principals, curriculum directors, 
and several parents. 

After examining all major Health curriculums, the Committee unanimously recommended the Scott-Foresman "You 
and Your Health Series." 

This program encompasses a broad spectrum of health education needs covered in ten major areas. These units 
include Mental Health; Personal Health; Fitness and Dental Health; Human Growth and Development; Nutrition; 
Family and Consumer Health; Prevention and Control of Disease; Drugs (including alcohol and tobacco); 
Community and Environmental Health; Safety and First Aid; and Health Career Awareness. 

Activity booklets are an important feature of the series and contain a "School and Home" page which enables the 
children to share with the family what they've learned in school. 

The program is designed to allow children to discuss the topics at length and to express their feelings and con 
cerns about health related matters. 

In tune with current medical and educational thinking, "You and Your Health" puts emphasis on helping children 



75 



develop sound mental and physical health in all its facets. 



The program was started this year in grades 4-6 system wide and is providing an important link with our al- 
ready popular 9-12 Health Programs called "Your Body - Inside and Out" and "Body Talk." 

Next September (1979) we will be implementing the program in grades K-3 followed by grades 7 and 8 in Septem- 
ber of 1980. 

READING 



A GUIDE TO AVAILABLE SUPPLEMENTARY MATERIALS: Grades 7-12 written in July, 1978, in conjunction with Mrs. 
Sarah Rueter, Children's Librarian, is on display at the Wilmington Memorial Library. It has been commended 
by the Board of Library Trustees as a "fine piece of reference material." 

A COMPENDIUM OF SURVIVAL SKILLS written during July, 1978, outlines the major reading tasks and skills that 
students need to survive as functionally literate adults in our society. These skills are interdisciplinary. 
They integrate reading, math, language, social studies, and science. As result this guide has been distrib- 
uted and is being used by directors and administrators involved in curriculum planning and development. 

WILMINGTON READING CURRICULUM: A GUIDE TO TEACHING READING 4-6 has received national recognition. It is con- 
sidered a "substantial contribution to the literature of education" and will be distributed by ERIC. In addi- 
tion it has been chosen to be listed in Recommended English Language Arts Curriculum Guides, 1978, which is 
published by the National Council of Teachers of English. 

TITLE I PARENT ADVISORY COUNCILS have been established at each Title I school. The Title I Parent Coordinator 
for 1978-79 are: 



Districtwide PAC Chairperson 
Boutwell School 
Buzzell School 
Glen Road School 
Shawsheen School 

Swain School 

Wildwood School 

Woburn Street School 



Barbara Metcalfe, Shawsheen School 

Pat Fenton and Jean Hill 

Joan Lawrence and Ann Martins 

Madeline Bimbo and Janet Doucette 

Alice Biase, Maryann Lee, Barbara Metcalfe 
and Marlene Phillips 

Marilyn Curran, Evelyn Cushing, Diane Kelley, 
Mary Lipski and Eileen Pacheco 

Dorothy Cantino, Jean Piscatelli, 
Barbara Raso and Marie Simone 

Barbara Larson, Arlene Potenza 
and Cheryl Ring 

In addition Mrs. Jean Hill has been elected to the State Title I PAC. She will represent Norfolk, Suffolk 
and Middlesex counties. 

The Title I Reading P rogram has received $84,070 in federal funds for this year. 

READING IN THE CONTENTS AREAS , a three-credit, in-service course is being offered to teachers in grades 7-12. 
Teachers from the following areas are taking this course in order to integrate the teaching of reading into 
everyday classroom instruction; English, Foreign Language, Math, Science, Social Studies, Reading and Library. 

READING SKILLS FOR FRESHMEN is designed to help the ninth graders to develop the reading/study skills needed 
to do well in their high school subjects. It is a semester course offered twice a week for one credit. 
Starting in September, 1979, this course will be offered five days a week for 2% credits. 

PSAT, SAT AND COLLEGE BOARD PREPARATION is open to all students who want help in preparing for these examina- 
tions. Students learn about the kinds of vocabulary and comprehension questions which appear on these tests 



76 



as well as how to approach these questions. Actual practice in taking tests is provided. Students have the 
option of taking this as a semester course, twice a week, for one credit, or on a short-term basis for no 
credit. 

READING FIELD SERVICE , an independent study in which high school students are trained to tutor elementary school 
children in reading, has been a springboard for launching students into teaching careers. Several high school 
tutors who are now in the program or who have previously participated in the program have decided to enter the 
teaching profession as a result of their experiences in this course. Currently high school students are tutor- 
ing children in the following elementary schools: 



Glen Road 
Shawsheen 



Swain 

Woburn Street 



THE VOLUNTEER READING TUTOR PROGRAM has expanded its training program to prepare parents to tutor children in 
reading in grades 1-8. The training program which originally placed parents only in grades 1-3 is a 20-hour 
program which includes classroom observation as part of the instruction. Ruth Filipowicz, Alice Sarasin, 
Thomasina Carlson, Jean Hill, Marlene Phillips, Barbara Raso, Clara Perry, Anna Johnson, Dorothy Frotten, Vera 
Rothwell, and Helen Allen are currently serving as Volunteer Reading Tutors. Mrs. Thomasina Carlson is the 
community coordinator for the program. 

SOCIAL STUDIES 

The Fideler Geography Program adopted this year at the two intermediate schools uses teaching and learning pro- 
cesses that involve students in thinking experiences. The program uses the "inquiry" or "discovery" method to 
help each student develop his or her thought processes. The objective of the program is to help each student 
use these basic thought processes in gaining a positive self-concept, and learning social studies skills. This 
program is a back to basics approach to social studies. The teacher assigns a concept to explore and the stu- 
dent makes his discoveries and conducts his research about this concept under the guidance and motivation of 
the teacher. 

We feel that the Fideler Program is an excellent follow-up to the Holt Data Bank System now used in all elemen- 
tary grades. The students apply the skills and concepts they have learned at the elementary level to the new 
program. While the Holt Data Bank provides all the resources necessary for the students to use in one central 
location, the Fideler Program encourages the students to use a variety of resources available to them in the 
classroom, the school library, the public library and at home. 

The Fideler Program is adaptable to students at all reading levels. For the slower reader more emphasis is 
placed on the student using visual materials such as pictures in the text, study prints, maps and globes, and 
filmstrips and recordings to make their discoveries. For the more able student the emphasis is placed on doing 
in-depth research in the text and in other printed material available to them. 




Les White Speaks to National Honor Society 

11 



■ 



SPECIAL EDUCATION 

During the 1977-78 school year 140 students were referred for individual core evaluations as provided for in 
Chapter 766. The following graph indicates, by grade level, the number of referrals received. 



REFERRAL PATTERN FOR SPECIAL NEEDS STUDENTS 
1977-1978 School Year 



30 
28 
26 
w 24 




RADE SCALE K123456789 10 1112 Parents and/or 

Outside Agencies 

Total Number of Referrals - 140 



7S 



An ongoing goal of Chapter 766 is the mainstreaming of special needs students into regular education program- 
ming. The Special Education Department is continuing to work cooperatively with all schools and departments 
in an effort to achieve this goal. The following two graphs provide data with regard to (a) movement among 
program classifications, and (b) increases and decreases of special education service hours for special needs 
students during the 1977-1978 school year. 



MOVEMENT AMONG PROTOTYPES 
1977-1973 School Year 



280 
240 
200 
160 
120 

80 
4C 



259 



49 



1 



35 



15 

ja 



Total Number of Reviews 

PH Number of Reviews Reduced by Prototype 
{{ j; | Number of Reviews Increased by Prototype 

lOl Number of Reviews Found Not Special Needs 



79 



i 



SERVICE TIME GRAPH 



1977-1978 School Year 






Increases 


□ 




Decreases 


S 


50 


Unchanged 


m 



%-2 2-4 4-6 6-15 
Hours Hours Hours Hours 



TOTAL SAMPLE OF STUDENTS - 



Remained 
Unchanged 



Does not include 502.2 students in Speech & Language Therapy Programs, 
as well as those in 502.4 and more restrictive prototypes. 



The Special Education Department continued to take advantage of the federal government's new Special Education 
Law, P.L. 94-142 by obtaining federal grant monies in an ongoing effort to upgrade and supplement the level of 
services to special needs students. Specifically, three grants, totalling $64,000, are currently operating 
within the school district. With this money, the School Department has hired two additional speech patholo- 
gists and a part-time communication assistant, two learning disabilities teachers (one for the high school and 
one for the elementary level), as well as additional contracted services of our licensed consulting psycholo- 
gist. With this additional staff the special education program has been able to reduce caseloads and is fur- 
ther able to provide more intensive ancillary services to special needs students. 

Wilmington's entitlement under P.L. 94-142 will increase substantially for the 1979-1980 school year. Esti- 
mated entitlements should total approximately $100,000, and the Special Education Department will be writing 
federal grant proposals in an effort to obtain these monies. 

ELEMENTARY REDISTRICTING 

Following an exhaustive study of projected enrollments last year from the School Committee and the Adminis- 
tration began to examine the possibility of realigning the elementary school districts with an eye toward a 
better distribution of students and a more appropriate use of existing facilities. During the summer of 1978 
our elementary principals, under the leadership of Mrs. Dolores Silva and Mr. Joseph Connelly, considered sev- 
eral options and presented these options to the Superintendent. After much discussion with the Committee aboi 
the various plans and after careful consideration of all the alternative facts the Superintendent recommended 
plan which has as its main feature the combining of the Wildwood School and the Central School Districts ef- 
fective at the start of the 1979-1980 school year. 



80 



The need for reorganization is shown by studying the projected decline of K-6 students in our schools over the 
next five years: 



K-6 DECLINE OF STUDENTS 

YEAR POPULATION DIFFERENCE 

1978/1979 2412 

1979/1980 2243 169 (7%) 

1980/1981 2102 141 (6.3%) 

1981/1982 1912 190 (9%) 

1982/1983 1778 134 (7%) 

From 1978/79 to 1982/83, the decline is 634 pupils which constitutes 26% of the current population. 

The general features of combining the Wildwood and Central Districts allow: 

a. The Swain School to become available for other use during the 1979/80 school year. The 
School Committee has already approved a plan to use it as a high school annex next year. 

b. District lines to become stabilized. 

c. The Whitefield area to be assigned permanently to the Woburn Street School. 

d. The lower Main Street area to be assigned permanently to the Shawsheen School. 

e. The lower Salem Street-Cunningham Street area to be assigned permanently to the Glen Road 
School. 

In addition to the Swain School becoming available to assist the high school, other advantages include a lower 
and well-balanced class size as well as much more stability in the new districts. Because of the substantial 
initial transfers and the fact that the Central District will lose its identity, these advantages will be par- 
tially offset during the first year. The benefits will, however, become more pronounced with each succeeding 
year. 

STATUS OF THE CLASS OF 1978 

Percent to four year non-state college and universities 15.1% 

Percent to four year state colleges and universities 23.4% 

Percent to two year non-state colleges 1.3% 

Percent to two year state colleges 8.0% 

Percent to nursing schools 6% 

Percent to other post high school education 2.9% 

Percent to further education 51.3% 

Percent to working forces 30.1% 

Percent to military service 1.0% 

Percent that failed to respond to senior survey 17.6% 

In conclusion, I would like to take this opportunity to extend my appreciation to the School Committee, admin- 
istrators, teachers, parents and students who contributed their efforts to the Wilmington Public Schools dur- 
ing the 1978 school year. A special note of thanks also is extended to the many town departments that co- 
operated with the school system during 1978. 



81 




Shawsheen Tech. School Committee 



The elected representatives of the School Committee are: 
BEDFORD 

Anthony Mazzone 

Joseph Rogers, Vice Chairman 

BURLINGTON 
John G. Murphy 
John P. Miller 



TEWKSBURY 

Richard E. Griffin, Chairman 
Wilson E. Brazile 

WILMINGTON 
Lawrence Flaherty 
Frank McLean 



BILLERICA 

Kenneth L. Buffum, Secretary-Treasurer 
Paul Heffernan 

In 1978, the Regional School Committee finally resolved the court suit related to a prior budget cut, to its 
satisfaction and the satisfaction of all five towns. This summary judgment determined by the courts ruled in 
favor of the school committee's right to regain the cut of $503,000. Fortunately, by the time of its final 
resolution a steady flow of unanticipated state reimbursements offset most of this amount. The School Com- 
mittee then decided to return proportionate shares to each town based upon the charter agreement and to deduct 
only sufficient funds to pay the final bill for all legal and court costs. Hopefully better understanding of 
the budget, especially by finance committees, will prevent such haphazard, illegal cuts in the future. The 
proper forum to discuss and change the fiscal autonomy of school committees is in the legislature — not in the 
courts . 

The School Committee in long hours of deliberation on contract negotiations and all other areas of major budget 
impact have made every effort to continue profitable, educational experiences for our students and, at the sam< 
time, to retain proper sensitivity to all residents who assist in the payment of our bills through real estate 
taxation. The projected budget, (for the next fiscal year) soon to go before a public hearing, has had much 
thought and consideration related to both education and finances. As the Committee closed this chapter relatec 
to this budget cutting, it was their hope that a renewed spirit of cooperation and accountability would develoj 
as an aftermath of these court deliberations. 



The Committee stands ready to reason with any and all of its constitutents . Regular, open meetings are held 
on the second and fourth Tuesdays of the month. Any person or group, who wishes to appear before the committee 
on any matter, should so inform the Superintendent-Director or Chairman at the 100 Cook Street, Billerica ad- 
dress of the school where all meetings are held. More responsive attendance and interest by residents at the 
committee meetings would also assist town meetings in deliberating budgetary decisions. 

In addition, the Committee met with the Chairman and Superintendent of each of the five towns within the dis- 
trict to discuss matters of mutual concern. One of the main issues discussed was the adaption of the current 
admissions process based on the input of the five superintendents. The Committee then asked the administratior 
to reflect on this input and to recommend changes in the process. Bruce Perkins, Guidance Director, very capa- 
bly handled this responsibility and the Committee is appreciative of his efforts in satisfying the needs of 
this delicate area of admissions. The Committee has made every effort to be sensitive to the thoughts of the 
administrators of the five towns and feels that the efforts in developing this new policy on admissions is 
proof of this fact. 



82 



Now that Shawsheen Tech has achieved its full enrollment of 1,600 full time day students, efforts on increased 
vocational and occupational education within the five town district must be increased by the Area Coordinator 
so as to satisfy all students in need of such training. Mr. John McDermott has done an excellent job in bring- 
ing new skill programs to the area high schools, in broadening his interest to career education and exploratory 
programs at lower grade levels, in achieving a healthier relationship with the industrial and business commun- 
ity, and in working closely with individual coordinators from the local school districts on proposals for state 
and federal funding of pertinent projects. Since the Committee and administration are not able to admit more 
students, this relationship of the Area Coordinator with the five towns has grown in importance. 

The Committee has earnestly sought a higher degree of awareness to fiscal responsibility in attention to budget 
allocations and preparation of budgets. These efforts are shown in a preliminary budget, which will again be 
reviewed at a public hearing in early January, 1979, that shows an increase of 1.5 per cent at this time. This 
will mean, all things being equal, a reduction in the assessments to the five towns. With all major employee 
units already under the provisions of negotiated contracts for one more year, these preliminary figures will 
not change a great deal. At this time, no full time positions other than a custodian/driver are anticipated. 
Continued maximum funding of all programs by the state will be earnestly sought. 

This budget will allow the Committee to operate a facility with quality programs in all needed and mandated 
areas at the lowest possible cost to the taxpayer. The history of placement of graduates on jobs in their 
skilled areas proves out to be exceptionally good in both quality of skills and high degree of placement. The 
excellence of training speaks for itself in the capability of our graduates. Continued financial assistance 
from residents and taxpayers will support these fully expanded programs. 

This year the achievements of many individual students in contests and displays as well as the records of 
several athletic teams have given Shawsheen Tech a truly unified school spirit. Students from five towns have 
blended together well. The School Committee is hopeful that this fine school spirit will continue to grow 
responsibly as traditions are built here at Shawsheen Tech. 




Student at Shawsheen Tech 

83 



Shawsheen Tech. Superintendent Director 



Results of a recent survey have shown that approximately 80% of all jobs do not require a college degree. Th 
combined with the mounting costs of a college education, necessitates many to consider alternative forms of 
education. Here at Shawsheen, favorable comments concerning the operation of the school, as well as the exce 
lent placement record of graduates, reflects continued strong interest by applicants for this school. 

This year has seen a growth in programs in the area of special needs in compliance with Chapter 766 under the 
direction of Kevin Dwyer, Special Needs Coordinator. In addition, more and more female students are enrollin 
in courses formerly considered for males only. We have made every effort to encourage these students to con 
sider areas such as electronics, drafting, graphic arts, machine shop, etc., where opportunities for employme 
are excellent. This, as well as publicizing these various programs, results in our complying with the state 
law Chapter 622 and federal law Title IX, both concerned with equal rights for all. 



Admissions 

The admissions policy has been modified after consultation with representatives of the five towns, 
procedure insures a cross section of the population being accepted. 

Enrollment figures as of October 1, 1978 were as follows: 



The new 



TOWN 


9th 


10th 


11th 


12th 


Total 


Bedford 


38 


31 


25 


15 


10! 


Billerica 


136 


135 


135 


136 


54; 


Burlington 


66 


65 


62 


50 


24: 


Tewksbury 


101 


107 


103 


99 


41C 


Wilmington 


74 


70 


67 


64 


21 


Totals 


415 


408 


392 


364 


1575 



Exploratory — Ninth Grade 

All students, including those with special needs, circulate among eight to ten different shops in four week 
cycles in order to give instructors an opportunity to evaluate their performance. At the conclusion of the 
ninth grade, students are assigned to a shop program which continues through the senior year. During twelfth 
grade, students doing satisfactory work, depending on job availability, are placed on a co-op plan where they 
work in industry on alternate weeks that they normally would be in shop. 

Afternoon Skill Training Program 

Because we cannot accommodate all those who apply, the supplemental program has been continued making it possi 
ble for an additional 308 students to enroll in the shop programs from 2:30 — 5 p.m. every day. This, combined 
with an academic program at their local shcool prior to 2:30 gives all these students a well rounded education 



84 



Summer Program 



In line with the objective of maximum utilization of our facility, the summer school program was again held 
this year for a six week period during July and August. This program made it possible for all five towns to 
combine their make-up courses here at Shawsheen as well as give other students an opportunity to develop skills 
in various areas. A total of 1,083 students attended the summer program. 

Evening School 

Evening School continues to be a very popular operation with some fifty programs serving 1,325 adults. These 
programs operate weekly, Monday through Thursday, from 7 — 10 p.m. during the period October through April. 

Special Needs 

The special needs program serves 213 students. Teachers, specially skilled in this area supervise the main- 
streaming of students into the curriculum as much as possible. With the assistance of federal funds, two 
programs were developed which include building maintenance and vocational aides. The purpose is to provide 
students with moderate special needs appropriate vocational training. 

Area Coordinator 

Area Coordinator, John McDermott, who's responsibility is to assist the five towns in developing skill train- 
ing programs within their own facilities, has made excellent progress during this year. In the early part of 
1978 arrangements were made for an electronic assembly program to be conducted by industrial arts teachers. 
This was initially done at Burlington and Billerica High Schools and this fall it is expected to expand to 
the remaining three towns. Some thirty electronic companies in this area have cooperated in developing the 
skill training program and making it possible for every student who satisfactorily completes the program to 
be employed by local industry. A second program, beginning this fall is for high school seniors interested 
in working in the various phases of the apparel industry. It is expected that this breakthrough for students 
in this area will provide excellent employment opportunities. Project OPTION, which is stated funded, has 
been under way this year with concentration in the middle schools of the towns. The purpose is to work with 
parents and female students in helping to make career choices in non-traditional and sex sterotyped occupations. 

Student Activities 

Awards have been received for participation in the Massachusetts Department of Agriculture Show, Burlington 
Mall; Grand Prize in contest sponsored by Frozen Food Association of New England; Massachusetts State Council 
of Carpenters poster design contest won by Debbie Gerry, Commercial Art Senior; First Prize for Bread and 
Bakery Products Division, Food Service Extension Show; Annual Voc-Tech Show, Burlington Mall, First Prize, 
Electrical Department, Second Prize, Maintenance Mechanics; National Scholastic Contest, Dan Williams, Jr., 
Billerica, Honorable Mention; Richard Tucker, Tewksbury, achieved national recognition of his Anti-Smoking 
Poster which was acknowledged by HEW in Washington, D.C., and featured in the national magazine, American 
Education. Vocational Industrial Clubs of America (VICA) which is now in its second year has grown to be the 
largest chapter in the state. This year has seen the finalizing of the house building in Bedford and start 
of a new Word Processing Program was started in conjunction with the Air Force Command in Hanscom Field who 
supplied all special equipment. This has made it possible for our students to be trained in this type of 
work using unclassified material supplied by Hanscom. 

Sports 

Sports program continues to be a very strong activity here at Shawsheen. This year outstanding features have 
been the Hockey team winning first place in the Commonwealth Conference and entering the State Tournament 
losing in the second round. Football '78 saw the Rams top the league for the first time winning eligibility 
for the Superbowl. Girls Track also won the championship in their competition. 

Graduation 



The Class of 1978 graduated on June 11 with some 320 seniors receiving diplomas. A report on senior placement 
follows : 

Employed in field 232 Employed in other fields 20 

Further Education 32 Process of securing employment 4 

Armed Services 22 Not placed — Special Circumstances 10 



85 



Advisory Committees 

School Committee approved a survey on the role of advisory committees utilizing two consultants. It is ex- 
pected that the importance of advisory committees will be reflected in guidelines to be established. 

"Give me a fish and you have fed me for a day, 
teach me to fish and I'll eat for a lifetime." 

Anonymous 



Sealer of Weights & Measures 



The following is a list of all weighing and measuring devices, scales, pumps, meters, and weights that were 
tested, sealed, not sealed, and condemmed during the year 1978. 






Sealed 


Not Sealed 


Adjusted 


Condemmed 


Balances, Scales, Weights 


185 


20 


81 


18 


Liquid Measuring Meters 


196 


12 


59 


28 


Capacity Measures 


32 


10 


18 


26 


Other Measuring Devices 


46 


16 


34 


18 


Prepackaged Foods Reweighed 


5,200 









Easter Bunny's Annual Appearance 

86 



Town Meetings 



WARRANT FOR THE ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION AND MEETING - MARCH 4, 1978 and MARCH 11, 1978 
WITH ACTION TAKEN THEREON 



TO: THE CONSTABLE OF THE TOWN OF WILMINGTON: 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed in the By-Laws 
of said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualified to vote in 
Town affairs to meet and assemble at the High School Gymnasium, Saturday, the Fourth of March, A.D. 1978 
at 9:45 o'clock in the forenoon, the polls to be opened at 10:00 A.M. and shall be closed at 8:00 P.M. for 
the lection of the Town offices: 

ARTICLE 1. To bring in your votes on one ballot respectively for the following named offices, to wit: 
Two Selectmen for the term of three years; One Selectman for the term of one year (unexpired term); 
One Moderator for the term of one year; Two members of the School Committee for the term of three years; 
One Member of the Housing Authority for the term of five years; One Member of the Redevelopment Authority 
for the term of five years. 

QUESTION No.l: Shall the Town of Wilmington grant licenses for the sale of alcoholic beverages to be 
consumed on the premises to legally chartered clubs within the boundries of said town? 

Yes 

No 

You are also hereby further required and directed to notify and warn the said inhabitants of the Town of 
Wilmington who are qualified to vote on elections and Town affairs therein to assemble subsequently and 
meet in Town Meeting at the High School Gymnasium, Church Street in said Town of Wilmington, on Saturday 
the eleventh day of March A.D., 1978 at 1:30 P.M., then and there to act on the following articles: 

In accordance with the above Warrant, the meeting was called to order by the Moderator, Mr. John M. Callan 
at 9:45 A.M., as much of the Warrant as is noted above was read and upon a motion by Mr. Stanley Webber, 
and seconded, it was voted to dispense with further reading of the Warrant. 

All voting machines were opened and the zero sheets were posted so that the candidates could examine them 
before the polls were opened. The checkers were prepared with their voting lists and Voter Identification 
cards and everything was in readiness at 10:00 A.M. 

The Polls were declared open at 10:00 A.M. by the Moderator, Mr. John M. Callan. 

At 8:00 P.M. the polls were declared closed by Priscilla R. Ward, Town Clerk, and the printer packs were 
removed from the back of the voting machines and one copy was given to the Total Tally Clerks and the 
other copy was posted outside the railing so that each candidate could add his own totals at once. There 
were sixty-six (66) absentee ballots cast which were added to the machine totals. 

The Town Clerk read the results of this election at 9:20 P.M. with a close margin in the Selectmen's race 
between A.A.Caira and A.D. Gillis. After further searching and a retally of each precinct the results 
were changed due to a 300 vote human error on the adding machine. Because of this error, the Town Clerk 
asked Mr. Caira to wait on his swearing in until all figures could be rechecked. He agreed and all other 



87 



ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION (continued) 



elected officials were sworn to the faithful performance of their duties. 

All the totals from the twenty- five machines plus the absentee ballots were recorded and declaration 
thereof made, as by law is directed and were for the following: 

SELECTMEN: - Three year term (Vote for two) VOTE 
Elected Aldo A. Caira, 188 Chestnut Street 1602 

A. Daniel Gillis, Randolph Road 1306 
Elected Rocco V. DePasquale, 45 Adams Street 1715 

Madelyn A. McKie, 318 Woburn Street 1211 
Blanks 494 

6328 

SELECTMEN: - One year (unexpired term) Vote for one 

Elected Robert J. Cain, 39 Arlene Avenue 2056 

Write ins 3 
Blanks 1105 

3164 

MODERATOR - One year term (Vote for one) 

Elected John M. Callan, 571 Woburn Street 2033 

Write Ins 1 
Blanks 1130 

3164 

SCHOOL COMMITTEE - Three year term (Vote for two) 

Elected - James D. Tighe, 84 Shawsheen Avenue 1836 
Philip A. Fenton, 69 Butters Row 1300 

Elected - Paul R. Washburn, 20 Ballardvale Street 1879 
Blanks 1313 

6328 

HOUSING AUTHORITY - Five year term (Vote for one) 

Elected - George W. Hooper, 12 Allen Park Drive 1860 
Elmer F. Parker, 11 Forest Street 924 
Blanks 380 

3164 

REDEVELOPMENT AUTHORITY - Five year term (Vote for one) 

Sidney R. Kaizer, 5 Cottage Street 1190 
Elected - Harold J. Allen, Jr. 1 Lowell Street 1504 

Blanks 470 

3164 

QUESTION 

"Shall the town of Wilmington grant licenses for the sale of alcoholic beverages to be consumed on the 
premises to legally chartered clubs within the boundries of said town?" 

Yes 1379 
No 439 

Blanks 1346 

Total 3164 

There were Three Thousand One hundred sixty-four (3164) votes cast in this election. 

(Mrs.) Priscilla R. Ward 
Attest: Town Clerk 

Wilmington, Mass. 



88 




ANNUAL TOWN MEETING (continued) 

RETURN OF SERVICE - ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

Middlesex, ss. Wilmington, Massachusetts February 16, 1978 

In accordance with the By-Laws of the Town of Wilmington I this day posted five (5) true and attested 
copies of the within Warrant at the following locations: Town Hall Bulletin Board, Town Library, 
U.S. Post Office, Elia's Country Store, and Lucci's Market, all in said town of Wilmington. 



A true copy: s/ Arthur V. Lynch. Jr . 

Attest: Constable of Wilmington 

(Mrs.) Priscilla R. Ward 
Town Clerk 
Wilmington, MA 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING. WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS - MARCH 11, 1978 

Before the meeting was called to order, the Moderator announced that we would observe a Flag ceremony 
by the Wilmington Girl Scouts. 

Student Government was opened by a short speech by Thomas Bachman, Student Town Moderator. 

Mr. Callan called the Town Meeting to order at 1:35 p.m. there being a quorum present. Father Mackin 
of St. Thomas's Church gave the invocation. 

Mr. Callan asked that the Town Clerk note that this meeting was properly posted according to our By-Laws, 
per Selectmen and the Constable of the Town. I, Priscilla R. Ward, certify that this was properly done. 

Mr. Callan began to read the Warrant and was interrupted by the Chairman of the Board of Selectmen, 
Aldo Caira, " I move that the Moderator dispense with further reading of the Warrant and take up and make 
reference to each article by number." So Voted. 

ARTICLE 2. To hear reports of Committees and act thereon. No reports were offered. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of 
paying unpaid bills of previous years, or do anything in relation thereto: Motion by Sterling C. Morris, 
"I move to pass over this article." So voted. 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the 
Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year 
beginning July 1, 1978, in accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and 
to issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any notes therefor, payable 
within one year, and to renew any note or notes as may be given for a period of less than one year in 
accordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17; or do anything in relation thereto: 
MOTION: by Sterling Morris, "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, with the approval 
of the Selectmen, to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the financial year 
beginning July 1, 1978 in accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 4, and to 
issue a note or notes therefor, payable within one year, and to renew any note or notes as may be given 
for a period of less than one year in accordance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. So voted. 

ARTICLE 5. To see how much money the Town will appropriate for the expenses of the Town and the salaries 
of several Town Officers and Departments and determine how the same shall be raised, whether by taxation, 
transfer from available funds, or otherwise; or do anything in relation thereto. 

MOTION: by Mr. Arthur Spear, Jr. "I move that the several and respective sums as recommended by the 
Finance Committee be raised by taxation or by transfer from available funds and appropriated for the 
purpose set forth in Article #5, each item to be taken up separately and voted on, subject to amendment. 
Motion so voted. 



89 



ACCORDINGLY THE FOLLOWING AMOUNTS WERE VOTED BY TRANSFERS OR BY TAXATION: 



GENERAL GOVERNMENT 

Selectmen - Legislative 

Salaries 

Expenses 



Selectmen - Elections 

Salaries 

Expenses 

Registrar of Voters 

Salaries 

Expenses 

Finance Committee 

Salary 

Expenses 

Town Manager 

Salary - Town Manager . 

Other Salaries 

Expenses 

Town Accountant 

Salary - Town Accountant 

Other Salaries 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 



Treasurer 

Salary 

Other Salaries .... 

Expenses 

Tax Title Foreclosures 



Collector 

Salary - Collector 
Other Salaries . . 
Expenses 



Town Clerk 

Salary - Town Clerk . . . 

Other Salaries 

Expenses 

Board of Assessors 

Salary - Principal Assessor 

Other Salaries 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 



2,500.00 
6,250.00 
8,750.00 



10,500.00 
9,200.00 
19,700.00 



1,500.00 
7,200.00 
8,700.00 



700.00 
4,240.00 j 
4,940.00 ! 

32,810.00 
31,426.00 
1,150.00 
65,386.00 



20,465.00 
12,317.00 
750.00 



33,532.00 



14,766.00 
11,978.00 
1,550.00 
5,000.00 
33,294.00 



15,602.00 
11,978.00 
4,760.00 
32,340.00 



12,687.00 
10,961.00 
650.00 
24,298.00 



24,737.00 
20,447.00 
3,200.00 



48,384.00 



90 



Town Counsel 

Salary (Retainer) $ 10,000.00 

Expenses (Court Appearances) 9,000.00 

19,000.00 

Town Hall 

Salaries -(Arthur Spear .. Amendment.." I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation 

and appropriate $19,612.00 for salaries." Amendment so voted.) 19,612.00 

Expenses 21,675.00 

Capital Outlay 

41,287.00 

Planning Board 

Salary 3,500.00 

Expenses 12,150.00 

Capital Outlay 200.00 

15,850.00 

TOTAL GENERAL GOVERNMENT 355,461.00 

PROTECTION PERSONS & PROPERTY 

Police Department 

Salary - Chief 32,134.00 

Lieutenant 20,881.00 

Sergeants 104,164.00 

Patrolmen.. Amendment by Arthur Spear.. "I move that the sum of $382,575.00 be appropriated 
for Police Department salaries-Patrolmen. The sum of $290,388.00 to be raised by transfer 
from the Revenue Sharing Account and the balance of $92,187.00 to be raised by taxation." 

Voted.. Amendment so voted 92,187.00 

Traffic Supervisors 38,197.00 

Clerks 30,833.00 

Vacation - Cost fill-in 45,000.00 

Sick Leave - Cost fill-in 30,000.00 

Miscellaneous Extra Details 30,000.00 

Paid Holidays 22,829.00 

Police Dog 800.00 

Specialists 4,050.00 

Night Shift Differential 8,500.00 

Expenses 22,276.00 

Capital Outlay 400.00 

Constable 

Salary 100.00 

Fire Department 

Salary - Chief 32,134.00 

Deputy Chief 21,946.00 

Lieutenants 70,415.00 

Privates ..( Amendment by Arthur Spear .."I move that the sum of $407,878.00 be appropriated 
for Fire Department Salaries - Privates; and that the sum of $290,388.00 be raised by transfer 
from the Revenue Sharing Account, and the bal ance of $117,490.00 be raised by taxation." 

Voted.. Amendment so voted) 117,490.00 

Calls Fire & Ambulance 18,400.00 

Vacation - Fill-in Cost 29,800.00 

Sick Leave - Fill-in Cost 14,000.00 

Paid Holidays 22,394.00 

Expenses 16,120.00 

Capital Outlay 6,703.00 

Civil Defense 

Salary 1,500.00 

Expenses 1,015.00 

Capital Outlay 



91 



Dog Officer 

Salary.. Amendment., by Joseph Balestrieri . ("I move to amend under line item Dog Officer 
Salary to $13,500.00 in order to make this a full time position in the Town.") Amendment 

Lost. Original voted 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 

Building Inspector 

Salary Building Inspector 

Other Salaries 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 

Board of Appeals 

Salary 

Expenses 

Capital Outlay 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 

Salary 

Expenses 



4,250.00 
2,400.00 




18,060.00 
12,041.00 
1,725.00 

1 



2,000.00 
260.00 




1,500.00 
50.00 



TOTAL PROTECTION PERSONS & PROPERTY 



876,554.00 



Public Works 
Town Engineer 

Salary - Town Engineer 

Other Salaries 

Expenses 

Highway 

Salary - Superintendent 

Other Salaries 

Expenses . .Amendment .. S .C . Morris.( "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and 
appropriate the sum of $149,350.00 for the expenses account." )So voted. Amendment voted . . 

Capital Outlay 

Drainage Projects 

Sidewalk Program 

Public Street Lights 

Road Machinery-Expenses 

Chapter 90 Construction.. Amendment . .Arthur Spear. ("I move that the sum of $43,232.00 

be appropriated for Chapter 90 Construction $43,232.00 to be raised by transfer from 

the Chapter 356, Acts of 1977 Account, with a balance of zero to be raised by Taxation.") 

Amendment so voted... Voted. 

Chapter 90 Maintenance 

Chapter 81 Maintenance 

Expenses 

Snow & Ice Control 

Salaries 

Expenses.. Amendment . ("I move that the sum of $95,000.00 be appropriated for the Snow & 
Ice Account, Expenses; and that the sum of $50,000 be raised by transfer from the Anti- 
recession Fiscal Assistance Account and the Balance of $45,000.00 to be raised by taxation.") 

Amendment Voted. . . So voted 

Capital Outlay 

Tree Warden 

Salaries 

Expenses . . Amendment . . S.C. Morris. ("I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation 

and appropriate $7,100.00 under the expenses account.") Amendment lost .. Voted 

Capital Outlay 



24,625.00 
54,217.00 
2,100.00 



23,512.00 
241,057.00 

149,350.00 
3,100.00 
25,000.00 


54,000.00 
50,000.00 



9,000.00 



50,000.00 



81,099.00 



45,000.00 
7,000.00 



27,343.00 

4,600.00 




92 



Dutch Elm Control 

Salaries 20,028.00 

Expenses 2,500.00 

Gypsy Moth Control 

Salaries 14,586.00 

Expenses 2,500.00 

Cemetery 

Salary Superintendent 16,647.00 

Other Salaries 59,432.00 

Expenses.. Amendment.. Arthur Spear. "I move that the sum of $15,600.00 be appropriated 

for the Department expenses account: $11,095.00 to be raised by transfer from the Sale 

of Cemetery Lots Account, and the balance of $4,505.00 to be raised by taxation. Amendment 

Voted. So voted 4,505.00 

Capital Outlay 70.00 

Parks 

Salaries 5,000.00 

Expenses 1,000.00 

Capital Outlay 

TOTAL PUBLIC WORKS 977,271.00 

HEALTH & SANITATION 
Board of Health 

Salary-Director 21,439.00 

Other Salaries 46,115.00 

Expenses 2,050.00 

Hospital & Medical Care 850.00 

Garbage Collection 

Solid Waste Disposal 186,715.00 

Drug Dependency Problems 13,500.00 

Mental Health Out Patient 17,000.00 

Mental Health 

TOTAL HEALTH & SANITATION 287,669.00 

Veteran's Aid 

Salary-Part-time Agent 2,860.00 

Other Salaries 9,239.00 

Expenses 325.00 

Assistance-Veterans 30,000.00 

TOTAL VETERANS' AID 42,424.00 

MAINTENANCE OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS 
School Maintenance & Operations 

Salaries - Superintendent 20,850.00 

Salaries - Other.. Amendment.. Arthur Spear.." I move that the Town vote to raise by . . 

taxation and appropriate the sum of $653,143.00 for the Salaries, Other." Amendment. . 

Voted.. So voted 653,143.00 

Expenses 121,500.00 

Fuel Expenses.. Amendment.. Mr. Graney, Park Street.. "I move that the Fuel expenses. . . . 

account be cut from 200,000.00 to $190,000.00. Amendment voted. Motion so voted 190,000.00 

Roof Repair 45,000.00 

Cost of Vandalism 18,000.00 

Capital Outlay 51,900.00 

School Grounds Maintenance 

Expenses 9,800.00 

Capital Outlay 



93 



Maintenance of Public Buildings (continued) 



Town Building Maintenance 

Expenses 86,500.00 

Capital Outlay 2,900.00 

TOTAL MAINTENANCE OF PUBLIC BUILDINGS 1,199,593.00 

LIBRARY 

Board of Library Trustees 

Salary-Director 20,259.00 

Salaries-Other 107,494.00 

Expenses . .Amendment . .Arthur Spear ("I move that the sum of $69,320.00 be appropriated for 
the Library expenses account; $6,414.00 to be raised by transfer from the State Aid to 
Public Libraries Account, and the balance of $62,906.00 to be raised by taxation.") 

Amendment Voted. . .So voted 62,906.00 

Capital Outlay 875.00 

TOTAL LIBRARY 191,534.00 

RECREATION 

Salary - Director 19,498.00 

Salaries - Other 74,845.00 

Expenses 32,280.00 

TOTAL RECREATION 126,623.00 

PERMANENT BUILDING COMMITTEE 

Salary OJ 

Expenses 

Contractual Services 

BEAUTIFICATION COMMITTEE 

Expenses 2,000.00 

Capital Outlay 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

Personal Services 500.00 

Expenses 700.00 

Capital Outlay 275.00 

Harnden Tavern 200.00 

TOTAL HISTORICAL COMMISSION 1,675.00 

CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Personal Services 1,800.00 

Expenses 1,585.00 

TOTAL CONSERVATION COMMISSION! 3,385.00 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

MOTION. . .by Arthur Spear ("I move that it be and hereby is the determination of the 
School Committee that the sum of $7,619,782.00 is the amount necessary for the support 
and operation of the public schools in the Town of Wilmington for the 1978-79 fiscal 
year, and that the budget for 1978-79 be reduced by the estimated remaining unspent 
funds in the federal accounts under public laws 864 and 874 in the amount of $50,000.00 
leaving an amount of $7,569,782.00 to be raised by taxation'.') After much discussion the 



motion was so voted and declared so by the Moderator 7,569,782.00 

Vocational Training 5,400.00 

Regional Voc School Dist 620,118.00 

TOTAL SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 8,195,300.00 



94 



COUNCIL ON AGING 

Personal Services $ 15,135.00 

Expenses 26,107.00 

Capital Outlay 450.00 

41,692.00 

MATURING DEBT & INTEREST 

Schools 386,915.00 

General Government 100,497.00 

Water. .Amendment. . Arthur Spear ( "I move that the sum of $121,740.00 be appropriated 
for Maturing Debt and Interest - Water; $121,740.00 to be raised by transfer from 
Water Available Surplus, with a balance of zero to be raised by taxation.")toendment 

Voted. So voted 

Sewer 237,450.00 

Authentication Fees & Misc. Debt 50.000.00 

TOTAL MATURING DEBT & INTEREST 774,862.00 

UNCLASSIFIED & RESERVE 

Insurance & Bonds. .Amendment. . Arthur Spear ("I move that the sum of $227,719.00 be 
appropriated for the Insurance and Bonds Account; and that the sum of $52,000.00 be 
raised by transfer from the Antirecession Fiscal Assistance Account and the balance 

of $175,719.00 to be raised by taxation. ") So voted 175,719.00 

Reserve Fund 50,000.00 

Blue Cross-Blue Shield & Group Life. .Amendment ( "I move that the sum of $440,000.00 
be appropriated for Blue Cross-Blue Shield and Group Life; $225,000 to be raised by 
transfer from Free Cash, and the balance of $215,000.00 to be raised by taxation 

Amendment Voted.. So voted 215,000.00 

Local Transportation 6,935.00 

Town Report 3,000.00 

Sewer Maintenance 4,000.00 

Bicentennial Commission 

Appraisals 7,500.00 

Training & Conference-In State 5,869.00 

Training & Conference-Out of State 3,000.00 

Veterans' Retirement 38,000.00 

Employees Retirement (Unused Sick Leave) 5,000.00 

Microfilming & Reader 

Incentive Pay-Police 17,200.00 

Incentive Pay-Fire 13,700.00 

Salary 1979 Adjustments & Additional Cost 150,000.00 

Additional Employees 

Unemployment Payments-Town & School 10,000.00 

TOTAL UNCLASSIFIED & RESERVE 704,923.00 

Total Budget by Taxation $13,780,966.00 

Total Budget by Transfers 544,481.00 

Revenue Sharing Account 580,776.00 

Bond Issue 2,750,000.00 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purchase of 
the several following items of capital expenditures and further to authorize the sale or turn-in, if 
any, of the several items listed below, and for the use of the several departments so designated; or 
do anything in relation thereto. The above was made into a motion and read by Mrs. Morris and said 
motion was so voted. 

a. Police Department. .To purchase four police vehicles. .Motion. . By Mr. Morris( "I move that the Town 
vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $20,000.00 for the purchase of four Police 
vehicles, and at the discretion of the Town Manager authorize the sale or turn-in of four vehicles 
presently used by Police Department." Finance Committee recommended approval.) So Voted. $20,000. 



95 



b. Fire Department 

1. To purchase a 500 gal. brush truck. .Motion. . Mr. Morris.. "I move that the Town vote to 
raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $35,000. for the purchase of a 500 gal. Brush 
Truck for the use of the Fire Department, and at the discretion of the Town Manager authorize 
the sale or turn-in of a brush truck presently used by the Fire Department .Finance Committee 
recommended approval.. So voted $35,000. 

2. To purchase a 3/4 ton pickup truck. .Motion by Mr. Morris.. "I move that the Town vote to 
raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $7,700. for the purchase of a 3/4 ton pickup truck 
for the use of the Fire Department, and at the discretion of the Town Manage authorize the sale 
or turn-in of pickup presently used by the Fire Department." Finance Committee recommended 
approval. Motion so voted, $7,700. 

3. To purchase a vehicle to be used by the Chief . .Motion by Mr. Morris.. "I move that we pass 
over Article 6-b-3 for the purchase of a Chief's car and take no action thereon. . .Finance 
Committee disapproved. Motion so voted. 

c. Engineering 

1. To purchase a Van.. Motion to pass over.. So voted. 

d. Highway Department 

1. To purchase one Dump Truck with coverall assembly... Motion by Mr. Morris.." I move that the 
Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $20,000. for the purchase of a Dump 
Truck with coverall assembly for the use of the Highway Department, and at the discretion of the 
Town Manager authorize the sale or turn-in of a Dump Truck presently used by the HigTiway Dept." 
Finance Committee recommended approval.. So voted $20,000. 

2. To purchase two Pickup Trucks. .Motion by Mr. Morris.. "I move that the Town vote to raise by 
taxation and appropriate the sum of $12,000. for the purchase of two (2) Pickup Trucks for the 
use of the Highway Department and at the discretion of the Town Manager authorize the sale or 
turn-in of two (2) Pickup Trucks presently used by the Highway Department . .Motion lost... 

159 yes.. 193 no.. 2nd Motion. .Arthur Spear.. "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and 
appropriate the sum of $6,000. for the purchase of one (1) Pickup Truck, etc... as above. Motion 
#2 passed, Finance Committee approved.. So voted $6,000. 

3. To purchase Snow Blower for front-end loader. .Motion. .by Mr. Morris.. "I move that the Town 
vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $20,000. for the purchase of a Snow Blower 
for front-end loader for the use of the Highway Department .. .Motion Lost... 148 yes... 184 No... 
Finance Committee disapproved. 

e. Cemetery Department 

1. To purchase backhoe for tractor. .Motion by Mr. Morris.. "I Move that we pass over Article 
6-e-l for the purchase of a backhoe and take no action thereon.. Motion passed.. No action taken. 

ARTICLE 7... To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $3,000. for the 
observance of Memorial Day and Veterans' Day and that the Moderator appoint a committee who shall 
arrange and have charge of said observances, or do anything in relation thereto. .Finance Committee 
approved motion by Mr. DePasquale as above.. So voted $3,000. 

ARTICLE 8... To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $750.00 (or a total of 
$1,500.) for the purpose of renewing under authority of Section 9 of Chapter 40 of the General Laws 
as amended the lease of: 

a. Veterans of Foreign Wars Clubhouse on Main Street for the purpose of providing suitable head- 
quarters for the Nee-Ellsworth Post No. 2458 of the Veterans of Foreign Wars of United States. 

b. American Legion Clubhouse, Inc. in Wilmington for the purpose of providing suitable headquarters 
for the Wilmington Post No. 136 of the American Legion; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by James Banda...same as above. Finance Committee disapproved. Motion so voted $1500. 

ARTICLE 9... To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and or the Town Manager 
to apply for, accept and enter into contracts from time to time for the expenditure of any funds 
without further appropriation alloted to Wilmington by the U.S. Federal Government under any 
Federal grant program; or do anything in relation thereto. Motion by Robert Cain, same as above. 
Finance Committee approved. Motion so voted. 



96 



ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to appropriate and authorize the Board of Selectmen 
to expend any allocation of monies received by the Town under Title II, Antirecession Fiscal 
Assistance, Federal Public Works Employment Act of 1976 for the purpose of defraying part of the 
cost of Public Street Lights, Account No. 345 and part of the cost of Snow & Ice Control, 
Account No. 325; or do anything in relation thereto. Motion by Aldo Caira same as above. 
Finance Committee approved. So voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money to acquire land 
for sewerage purposes and for construction of a septage disposal station; and to authorize the 
Water and Sewer Commissioners to purchase, take by eminent domain or receive as a gift the parcel 
of land bound and described as follows: 

Easterly by Woburn Street, 107.92 feet; Northerly by land of Edward C. & Helen Whitney 118.76 
feet; Westerly by land of John E. Whitney Jr. 171.98 feet; Southerly by land of John E.Whitney, 
Jr. 100.00 feet being Lot A containing 13,995 square feet, all as shown on a plan entitled, 
"Plan of Lot A, Woburn Street, Wilmington, Massachusetts, Scale 1"=40', December 29, 1975, 
Robert L. Higgins, Town Engineer; a copy of which is on file in the office of the Town Engineer; 
and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation or transfer from 
available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise; or do anything in relation thereto. Request of 
Water and Sewer Commissioners. Finance Committee recommends approval. Zero effect on the tax 
rate. 

Motion by Arthur Smith... "I move that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $35,000. to 
acquire a site, either by purchase, taking by eminent domain, by accepting as a gift, or otherwise, 
for the purpose of constructing a septage disposal station, a parcel of land bound and described as 
follows, or authorize the Board of Water and Sewer Commissioners to take any lesser part of the 
below described parcel of land; etc. same as article; to the point of Town Engineer; a copy of which 
is on file in the office of Town Engineer, and for the purpose of constructing and equipping said 
septage disposal station, and that the appropriation be raised by transfer from Sewer Department 
Account #370. Motion approved by 2/3 vote... Vote 297 Yes... 14 No. 

ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of 
making certain improvements to the water system to help alleviate the rusty water problem and to 
authorize the Water Commissioners to make specific improvements, and to determine how the appropriation 
shall be raised, whether by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or otherwise; or 
do anything in relation thereto. Request of Water and Sewer Commissioners. Finance Committee recommends 
approval $2,750,000 by Bond Issue. 

Motion by George R. Allan. "I move that the Town vote to raise and appropriate $2,750,000. for the 
purpose of constructing and equipping a water treatment plant to treat the Butters Row, Town Park 
and Chestnut Street wells on land previously acquired, or to be acquired, for Water Department 
purposes, and that the Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, is hereby authorized to borrow 
a sum not to exceed in the aggregate $2,750,000. under and pursuant to Chapter 44, Section 8, Clause 4 
of the General Laws as amended and supplemented, and issue the bonds or notes of the Town therefor, at 
one time, or from time to time, each issue of such bonds or notes to be payable in not more than 20 years 
from its date, and that the Board of Water and Sewer Commissioners be and they hereby are, authorized to 
accept, allocate and expend any funds that may be received for this purpose from the Federal or State 
Government under any grant program, as a contribution toward the cost of the project, in addition to the 
sum appropriated hereby. Motion voted.. The article caused much discussion but was passed by standing 
vote with 337 voting Yes and only 32 No... So Voted. 

ARTICLE 13. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of 
installing a library security system with related equipment and services for the Wilmington Memorial 
Library; or do anything in relation thereto. 

Motion by John S. McNaughton. ."I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum 

of $28,000. for the purpose of installing a library material security system with related equipment 

and services for the Wilmington Memorial Library. Motion so voted. Finance Committee approved. So voted. 

The meeting was adjourned at this point at 6:10 p.m. to reconvene at 8:00 p.m. Motion was made by the 
Moderator and seconded. So Voted. 



97 



Mr. Callan reopened the meeting at 8:05 p.m. with a quorum being present. 

ARTICLE 14. To see whether the Town pursuant to authority granted in General Laws Chapter 40D, Section 
21(g), as amended, will vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen and Town Manager to enter into a 
contract with the operator of a solid waste disposal facility for the disposal of refuse, garbage and 
waste and for the use of by-products resulting from the operation of such facilities, which contract 
will: 

L. be for a term of twenty years, more or less; 

2. include provisions for the delivery of minimum amounts of refuse, garbage and waste and payments for 
the use of the facilities to be based thereon; 

3. provide for unit prices that will be graduated and for adjustments thereof and for the use of steam, 
electricity and other by-products resulting from the use of the facilities and for credits or payment 
of the Town resulting therefrom: 

4. the use by the Town or other municipalities of the uncommitted capacity of such facilities; 

5. contain other provisions incidental and related to the foregoing general matters; and 

6. be generally in the form of a proposed contract, on file in the Town Clerk's office, negotiated by 
representatives of the member communities of the Northeast Solid Waste Committee (NESWC) or such 
other regional agency or contractor, with such changes therein as may be approved by said Board of 
Selectmen and Town Manager; or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee recommends 
approval as amended. Motion was amended by Mr. Morris by adding #7 to the article. 

7. Any proposed contract negotiated by the Board of Selectmen and Town Manager shall require ratificatio 
of said contract at a future Town Meeting. Motion on the amended article. Voted. Amended article 

so voted. 

ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money to acquire land for 
school purposes - Athletic Field Extension, and to authorize the Selectmen to purchase, take by eminent 
domain or receive as a gift the parcel of land bound and described as follows: beginning at the north- 
easterly corner of land of the Town of Wilmington as shown on a plan entitled "Topographical Plan, Proposec 
School Development , Wilmington, Massachusetts, October 1944, Scale 1 in. - 50 feet, H. Kingman Abbot, 
Surveyor, Reading, Mass." thence S 26°41'50" W distant 160.08 feet through land of Frotten to a point, 
thence S 41°35'11" W distant 245.00 feet through land of Frotten and land of Luongo to a point, thence S 
54°37'19" W distant 221.09 feet through land of Luongo and land of Fenton to a point, thence N 63°01'06" 
distant 181.09 feet through land of Fenton to a point, thence N 45°36'43" E distant 50.00 feet by land of 
the Town of Wilmington to a point, thence N 19°36'35" E distant 45.50 feet by said land to a point, thence 
S 63 53'19" E distant 200.49 feet by said land to a point, thence N 44°08'35" E distant 141.82 feet by sai 
land to a point, thence N 41°35'11" E distant 92.75 feet by said land to a point, thence N 41°10'03" E 
distant 280.77 feet by said land to the point of beginning, containing 35,500 square feet and to determine 
how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation or transfer from available funds, by borrowing, 
or otherwise; or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee recommends approval as amended. 

Motion by Mr. Francis Kelley.."I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of 
$50.00 to acquire land for School Purposes - Athletic Field Extension, and to authorize the Selectmen to 
purchase, take by eminent domain or receive as a gift the parcel of land bounded and described as follows: 
beginning at the southerly corner of land of the Town of Wilmington as shown on a plan entitled 
"Topographical Plan, Proposed School Development, Wilmington, Massachusetts, October 1944, Scale 1 in = 
50 feet, H. Kingman Abbott, Surveyor, Reading, Mass. "thence S 44°08'35" W distant 100.00 feet through lai! 
of Fenton to a point, thence N 63°01'06" W distant 181.09 feet through said land to a point, thence N45° 
36'43" E distant 50.00 feet by land of Town of Wilmington to a point, thence N 19°36'35" E distant 45.50 
feet by said land to a point thence S 63 53'19" E distant 200.49 feet by said land to the point of 
beginning, containing 17,410 square feet. Motion so voted by unanimous vote. 

ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for the purpose of 
providing a new eight-lane running track at the Wilmington High School ;or do anything in relation thereto. 
Motion by Mr. Francis Kelley.."I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of 
$80,000. for the purpose of providing a new six-lane running track at the Wilmington High School. Finance 
Committee recommends approval. Motion so voted. Voted unanimously. 




98 



ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money for Community Schools, 
said sum to be administered under the Wilmington Community Schools, Inc., and to determine how said 
appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation, by transfer from available funds, by borrowing or 
otherwise; or do anything in relation thereto. Motion by Mr. Morris, "I move that the Town vote to raise 
by taxation and appropriate the sum of $37,000. for the Community Schools program. Motion lost. Motion 
by L. Barbara Hooper, "I move that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $20,000 by taxation 
for the purpose of providing a community school program, said funds so appropriated to be expended under 
the direction of the School Committee, and provided that said funds shall not be considered a "necessary 
expenditure" of the School Committee and therefore shall not be subject to fiscal autonomy. Much 
discussion followed. Motion lost. Yes 115 and No 232. 

ARTICLE 18. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money to acquire land or ease- 
ments for drainage purposes, and to authorize the Selectmen to purchase, take by eminent domain or receive 
as a gift the parcel of land bound and described as follows: beginning at a point in the northwesterly 
sideline of Woburn Street said point being northeasterly and distant 108.24 feet from the back center of 
a stone bound marking the southwesterly terminous of a curve of 458.75 feet radius, thence N 39°54'32" W 
distant 91.28 feet to a point, thence N 26°02'00" W distant 148.04 feet to a point, thence N 63°58'00" E 
distant 25.00 feet to a point, thence S 26°02'00" E distant 145.00 feet to a point, thence S 39 54'32" E 
distant 88.93 feet to a point, thence by a curve of 458.75 feet radius, distant 25.01 feet to the point 
of beginning, containing 5919 square feet, all as shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Easement for Storm 
Drain Purposes off Woburn Street, Wilmington, Mass." dated December 13, 1976, by Robert L. Higgins, Town 
Engineer, and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation or by transfer from 
available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise; or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee 
recommends approval $150. Motion by A. John Imbimbo, "I move that the Town vote to raise by taxation 
and appropriate $150. to acquire land or easements for drainage purposes, and to authorize the Selectmen 
to purchase, take by eminent domain or receive as a gift the parcel of land bound and described as in 
original article. Mr. William McCarthy wanted to go on record for the owner as opposed to this article. 
2/3 vote being required, motion passed. So voted. Yes 212 and No 8. 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money to acquire land or 
easements for drainage purposes, and to authorize the Selectmen to purchase, take by eminent domain or 
receive as a gift the parcel of land bound and described as follows: beginning at a point in the 
westerly sideline of Federal Street, said point being northerly and distant 207 feet from the northerly 
terminous of a curve of 61.44 feet radius at Woburn Street as shown on the 1908 County Layout of Woburn 
Street, thence westerly 225 feet through land of Markey, thence northerly 20 feet by land of Burns, 
thence easterly 220 feet through land of Markey, thence southerly by the westerly sideline of Federal 
Street 20 feet to the point of beginning, containing 4454 square feet, together with a 10 foot wide 
temporary construction easement southerly of and adjacent to the first above described line and a 10 
foot wide temporary construction easement northerly of and adjacent to the third above described line, 
and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation or by transfer from available 
funds, by borrowing, or otherwise; or do anything in relation thereto. Motion by Mr. Morris, "I move 
that the Town vote to raise by taxation and appropriate $150 to acquire land or easement for drainage 
purposes, and to authorize the Selectment to purchase, take by eminent domain or receive as a gift the 
land bound and described as in original article. Attorney William Diamond represented the Markey family 
stating their objection to this article. 2/3 vote is required. Motion lost. Yes 5 and No 300. 

ARTICLE 20. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Revised By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of 
Wilmington by deleting in its entirety Section 12 of Chapter 5 and inserting in its place a new Section 
12 as follows: 

Section 12, Possession and Consumption of Alcoholic Beverages 

1. Definitions - The following definitions shall apply in the interpretation and enforcement of 
this By-Law: 

(1) Public Way shall mean the entire width between the lines of every way publicly main- 
tained when any part thereof is open to the use of the public for purposes of vehicular 
travel and shall include the entire width of any sidewalk within the lines of such way. 
In the case of ways established by prescription or concerning which no official layouts 
exist, the edges of the surface of the traveled way shall be deemed to be the lines of 
such public ways. 



99 



(2) Alcoholic Beverages shall mean any beverage defined as an alcoholic beverage in Section 1 
of Chapter 138 of the General Laws. 

(3) Public Property shall mean and include all Town land, school grounds, municipal parking 
lots, municipal parks, municipal playgrounds and all real property, buildings, or offices 
owned by or leased to the Town or occupied or used by any board, department, committee, 
commission or office of the Town. 

(4) Private Property shall mean any real property within the Town of Wilmington which is not 
owned by the Town. 

2. No person shall consume any alcoholic beverages on any public way or on any way to which the 
public has a right of access. 

3. No person shall bring any alcoholic beverages onto any public property or onto any private 
property or possess or consume any alcoholic beverages in or upon any public property or private property 
without the permission of the owner or person lawfully in charge or control of such public or private 
property. 

4. All alcoholic beverages possessed or consumed in violation of this By-Law shall be seized and 
held until final adjudication of the charge against the person or persons arrested or summoned before the 
court. After final adjudication all alcoholic beverages seized shall be returned to the person or persons 
entitled to the lawful possession of them. 

5. Violations of this By-Law are punishable by a fine of Fifty ($50.00) Dollars for each offense. 

6. This By-Law shall be enforced on behalf of the Town by its Police Department which shall have the 
right to arrest any and all persons in violation of said By-Law. 

7. If any part, section or provision of this By-Law is found to be invalid, the remainder of this 
By-Law shall not be affected thereby. Or do anything in relation thereto. 

Finance Committee recommends approval. Article 20... Motion by Rocco DePasquale . . "I move that the Town 
vote to amend the revised By-Laws of the Inhabitants of the Town of Wilmington by deleting in its entirety 
Section 12 of Chapter 5 and insert in its place a new Section 12 as follows. Same as proposed article. 
Motion so voted. Passed unanimously. 

ARTICLE 21. To see if the Town will vote to accept as Town ways, the layout of the following described 
streets, as recommended by the Planning Board and laid out by the Selectmen under the provisions of 
General Laws (Chapter 82, as amended, relating to the Laying Out, Alteration, Relocation and Discontinu- 
ance of Public Ways and specific repairs thereon) which layouts are filed in the office of the Town Clerk, 
and which, with plans therein, are hereby referred to for more particular description; and to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to take by right of Eminent Domain such land, slope, drainage or other easements as 
may be necessary to effect the purpose of this Article; and to determine how an appropriation shall be 
raised, whether by taxation or by transfer from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise for the 
purpose of construction of said ways and for the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of land, 
slope, drainage or other easements therefor; or do anything in relation thereto: 

a. Arlene Avenue, from Dorothy Avenue to Ella Avenue 

b. Ella Avenue, from Arlene Avenue to Arlene Avenue 

c. Franklin Avenue, from Arlene Avenue to Arlene Avenue 

Finance Committee recommends approval $150. Article 21.. Motion by A. John Imbimbo. ."I move that the Town 
vote to accept as Town ways, the layout of the following described streets, as recommended by the Planning 
Board and laid out by the Selectmen under the provisions of General Laws (Chapter 82, as amended, relating 
to the Laying Out, Alteration, Relocation and Discontinuance of Public Ways and specific repairs thereon), 
which layouts are filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and which, with plans therein, are hereby referrei 
to for more particular description; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by right of Eminent 
Domain such land, slope, drainage or other easements as may be necessary to effect the purpose of this 
Article; and to vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum of $150.00 for the purpose of construc- 
tion of said ways and for the payment of any damages resulting from the taking of land, slope and drainage 
or other easements therefor: (a) Arlene Avenue, from Dorothy Avenue to Ella Avenue (b) Ella Avenue, from 
Arlene Avenue to Arlene Avenue (c) Franklin Avenue from Arlene Avenue to Arlene Avenue . .Motion so voted. 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate a sum of money to acquire recreation and 
open space land and for such purpose to authorize the Selectmen to purchase, take by eminent domain, 
receive as a gift or execute an option to purchase for certain lands and buildings owned by the Garden of 
Eden Country Club, Inc. all as shown as Parcel 23 and 23A on Assessor's Map 2, containing 45.58 acres, 
more or less; and to determine how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation or by transfer 
from available funds, by borrowing, or otherwise and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to apply for 
and expend any funds from the State and Federal government; or do anything in relation thereto. Finance 



100 



Committee recommends disapproval. Article 22. .Motion by John Heine.. "I move that the Town vote to transfer 
from the bond account balances the following amounts; Account #1110 Woburn St. School $3,339.19 Account 
#1111 Woburn St. School addition $9,156.61 Account #1115 Shawsheen Avenue School $43,938.14 Account #1130 
West Intermediate School $9,747.22 Account #1140 Wilmington Memorial Library $40,410.41 and to raise by 
taxation and appropriate the sum of $52,000. to acquire recreation and open space land, and for such 
purpose to authorize the Selectmen to purchase, take by eminent domain, receive as a gift or execute an 
option to purchase for certain lands and buildings owned by the Garden of Eden Country Club, Inc. all as 
shown as Parcel 23 and 23A on Assessor's Map 2, containing 45.58 acres, more or less; to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to apply for and expend any funds from the State and Federal Government and to obey any 
restrictions as to jurisdiction of authority required by said State and Federal Governments for the use 
of said funds. Much discussion. Motion lost. 75 Yes and 227 No. 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to transfer the Town-owned Salem Street land acquired for the 
construction of a public school or schools to the care, custody, management and control of the Board of 
Selectmen, said land to be used for open space and recreational purposes; or do anything in relation 
thereto. Finance Committee recommends disapproval. Article 23. Motion by Frank Sferrazza "I move that 
the Town vote to transfer Town-owned Salem Street land acquired for the construction of a public school or 
schools to the care, custody, management and control of the Board of Selectmen, said land to be used for 
open space and recreational purposes. Vote was Yes 116 and 109 No. Motion lost for lack of 2/3 vote. 
This article was brought up for reconsideration by Mr. Belbin later in the evening. Motion lost. 
Moderator so stated. 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to alter and relocate as Town ways, the following described 
streets, as recommended by the Planning Board and laid out by the Selectmen under the provisions of 
General Laws (Chapter 82, as amended, relating to the Laying Out, Alteration, Relocation and Discontin- 
uance of Public Ways and specific repairs thereon), which alterations and relocations are filed in the 
office of the Town Clerk, and which, with plans therein, are hereby referred to for more particular 
description; and to authorize the Board of Selectmen to take by right of Eminent Domain such land, slope, 
drainage or other easements as may be necessary to effect the purpose of this Article; and to determine 
how an appropriation shall be raised, whether by taxation or by transfer from available funds, by borrowing 
or otherwise for the purpose of construction of said ways and for the payment of any damages resulting 
from the taking of land, slope, drainage or other easements therefor; or do anything in relation thereto: 

a. Forest Street, from 100 feet north of Cochrane Road to 400 feet north of Cochrane Road 

b. Lowell Street, from Woburn Street 350 feet westerly 

c. West Street, from Lowell Street 250 feet southerly 

d. Woburn Street, from 350 feet north of Lowell Street to 400 feet south of Lowell Street 
Finance Committee recommends approval $200. Article 24. Motion by Rocco DePasquale "I move that the 
Town vote to alter and relocate as Town ways, the following described streets, as recommended by the 
Planning Board and laid out by the Selectmen under the provisions of General Laws (Chapter 82, as amended, 
relating to the Laying Out, Alteration, Relocation and Discontinuance of Public Ways and specific repairs 
thereon), which alterations and relocations are 'filed in the office of the Town Clerk, and which, with 
plans therein, are hereby referred to for more particular description; and to authorize the Board of 
Selectmen to take by right of Eminent Domain such land, slope, drainage, or other easements as may be 
necessary to effect the purpose of this Article; and to vote to raise by taxation and appropriate the sum 
of $1,050.00 for the purpose of construction of said ways and for the payment of any damages resulting 
from the taking of land, slope, drainage or other easements therefor; (a) Forest Street from 100 feet north 
of Cochrane Road to 400 feet north of Cochrane Road (b) Lowell Street, from Woburn Street 350 feet westerly 
(c) West Street, from Lowell Street 200 feet southerly (d) Woburn Street, from 44 feet north of Lowell 
Street to 400 feet south of Lowell Street. 2/3 vote required. Vote unanimous. Declared so by Moderator. 

ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law of the Town of Wilmington relative to 
signs by making the following changes: Add under Section III - 3,B,5 the following sentence: No sign or 
accumulation of signs, however, shall exceed one hundred square feet in total size. Delete, under Section 
IV-5, subsection 2 and 3 and insert in their place; 2. Projecting signs shall not exceed two feet in 
height or three feet in length. 3. Wall signs shall not exceed two feet in height or ten feet in length. 
Or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee recommends disapproval. Article 25. Motion by 
James F. Banda. "I move to pass over this article." So voted. 

ARTICLE 26. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law of the Town of Wilmington by: 
Deleting V-5 Lot Depth 



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For the purpose of administering this Section, Minimum Lot Depth shall be measured at right angles 
at every point in the Minimum Lot Frontage, and adding V-5 Lot Depth 

For the purpose of administering this Section, Minimum Lot Depth shall be measured at right angles 
eighty (80) percent of the Minimum Lot Frontage, or do anything in relation thereto. Submitted by 
Planning Board. Finance Committee recommends approval. Article 26. Motion by Planning Board, all members 
signed. "I move that the Town vote to amend the Zoning by-Law of the Town of Wilmington by Deleting 
V-5 LOT DEPTH for the purpose of administering this Section, Minimum Lot Depth shall be measured at right 
angles at every point in the Minimum Lot frontage, and ADDING V-5 LOT DEPTH for the purpose of administer- 
ing this Section, Minimum Lot Depth shall be measured at right angles at Eighty (80) percent of the 
Minimum Lot Frontage. Motion proposed by William Hooper, and disapproved by Board of Appeals. 2/3 vote 
required. Yes 43 and No. 147. Motion lost. So stated by Moderator. 

ARTICLE 27. To see if the Town will vote to receive as a gift from Mrs. Elinor Ristuccia a parcel of land 
shown as Parcel 9 on Assessors' Map 39 containing about five acres and located adjacent to Main Street, 
and to ratify and confirm the memorandum of acceptance dated December 29, 1977; or do anything in relation 
thereto. Finance Committee recommends approval. Article 27. Motion by A. John Imbimbo "I move that the 
Town of Wilmington vote to receive as a gift from Mrs. Elinor Ristuccia a parcel of land shown as Parcel 
9 on Assessor's Map 39 containing about five (5) acres and located adjacent to Main Street, and to ratify 
and confirm the memorandum of acceptance dated December 29, 1977. "Motion so voted. 

ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to increase the size of the membership of the Wilmington 
Historical Commission to seven members subject to and pursuant to Section 8D of Chapter 40 of the General 
Laws; or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee recommends approval. Article 28. Motion by 
Aldo Caira.."I move that the Town vote to increase the size of the membership of the Wilmington 
Historical Commission to seven (7) members subject to and pursuant to Section 8D of Chapter 40 of the 
General Laws. Motion so voted. 



ARTICLE 29. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to Larz Neilson a 
certain parcel of town-owned land shown as part of Parcel 8A on Assessors' Map 87, containing 5,902 square 
feet, subject to such terms and conditions as the Selectmen may determine, and further to get the minimum 
amount to be paid for such conveyance; or do anything in relation thereto. Article by Petition. Finance 
Committee recommends approval. Article 29. Motion by Larz Neilson... "I move that the Town vote to 
authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to Larz Neilson a parcel of town-owned land shown as part of 
Parcel 8A on Assessors Map 87, containing 5,902 square feet, subject to such terms and conditions as the 
Selectmen may determine, and further to set the minimum amount of $3,790.00 to be paid for such conveyance. 
Standing vote called for and so voted. Vote 263 Yes and 1 No. So Voted. 

ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to Lawrence L. 
Redding, 301 Middlesex Ave., Wilmington a certain parcel of town-owned land shown as Parcel 34 on Assessors 
Map 36, bound and described as follows: 

Beginning at a point in the easterly sideline of Jere Road said point being southerly and distant 
75.09 feet from the southerly terminous of a curve of 160 feet radius, thence N 51 E distant 107.80 by 
Lot 51 to a point, thence N 28°57'20" W distant 94.57 feet by Lot 60 to a point, thence S 77°47'09" w 
distant 120.00 feet by Lot 53 to a point, thence bearing to the left with a curve of 160 feet radius 
distant 74.80 feet by said sideline of Jere Road to a point of tangency, thence S 39°00' E distant 75.09 
feet by said sideline to the point of beginning being Lot 52 containing 14,227 square feet, all as shown 
on a plan entitled "Atkins Grove Park, Wilmington, Mass. April 1952, Scale 1 in. equals 100 feet, H.Kings- 
man Abbott, Registered Surveyor, Reading, Mass." which plan is filed as Plan 186 in Plan Book 81 in the 
Middlesex North Registry of Deeds, subject to such terms and conditions as the Selectmen may determine 
and further to set the minimum amount to be paid for such conveyance; or do anything in relation thereto. 
Article by Petition. Finance Committee recommends approval. Article 30. Motion by Lawrence Redding. 
"I move that the Town vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to Lawrence L. Redding, a certain 
parcel of town-owned land shown as Parcel 34 on Assessor's Map 36, bound and described as, see above 
article, subject to such terms and conditions as the Selectmen may determine and further to set the 
minimum amount of $8,500.00 to be paid for such conveyance. 2/3 vote required. So voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to Angelo and 
Thelma Grassia, 138 Chestnut St., Wilmington a certain parcel of town-owned land shown as part of Parcel 
4 on Assessors' Map 15, bound and described as follows: 

Beginning at a point in the southerly sideline of Chestnut Street said point being the northeasterly 
corner of said Parcel, thence southerly distant 291.0 feet by Parcel 3, thence westerly distant 60 feet by 
Parcel 4A, thence northerly distant 291 feet through Parcel 4, thence easterly distance 60 feet by 



102 



Chestnut Street, to the point of beginning, containing 17,400 square feet and being part of a lot shown 
on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in Wilmington, Mass., Surveyed for Town of Wilmington Scale 1" equals 
30 feet, James A. Bancroft, C.E. Reading, July 28, 1898" subject to such terms and conditions as the 
Selectmen may determine, and further to set the minimum amount to be paid for such conveyance; or do 
anything in relation thereto. Article by Petition. Finance Committee recommends approval subject to 
restrictions agreed upon by purchaser. Article 31.. Motion by Mr. Morris for petitioner .. "I move that the 
Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to Angelo and Thelma Grassia, 138 Chestnut 
Street, Wilmington, a certain parcel of town-owned land shown as part of Parcel 4 on Assessors' Map 15, 
bound and described as follows: Beginning at a point in the southerly sideline of Chestnut Street said 
point being the northeasterly corner of said parcel, thence southerly distant 100.0 feet by parcel 3, 
thence westerly distant 25 feet through parcel 4, thence northerly distant 100 feet through parcel 4, 
thence easterly distant 25 feet by Chestnut Street, to the point of beginning, containing 2500 square 
feet and being part of a lot shown on a plan entitled "Plan of Land in Wilmington, Mass., surveyed for 
Town of Wilmington, Scale 1" = 30 feet, James A. Bancroft, C . E. , Reading, July 28,1898", subject to such 
terms and conditions as the Selectmen may determine, and further to set the minimum amount of $100.00 to 
be paid for such conveyance. 2/3 vote required. Finance Committee recommends approval as amended. 
Motion so voted, unanimously. 

ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to Frank A. and 
Joanne Corvino a certain parcel of town-owned land shown as Parcel 54 on Assessors' Map 94 containing 
about 16,290 square feet, subject to such terms and conditions as the Selectmen may determine and further 
to set the minimum amount to be paid for such conveyance; or do anything in relation thereto. Motion by 
Frank Corvino.." I move that the Town vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to Frank A. and 
Joanne Corvino a certain parcel of town-owned land shown as Parcel 54 on Assessors' Map 94, subject to 
the restriction, for the benefit of the grantor herein that the premises herein conveyed shall become 
part of the grantee's contiguous premises and shall only be used for extension of a principal building 
structure currently existing and/or for any lawful accessory use appurtenant thereto. Subject to the 
further restriction, for the benefit of the grantor herein that the premises herein conveyed shall not 
be divided or subdivided either with or without the grantee's contiguous premises. This restriction 
shall run with the land herein described and shall be binding on the grantee, his heirs and assigns and 
successors in title, all in accordance with law. The premises are conveyed subject to easements and 
restrictions of record insofar as the same are in force and applicable, and subject to such other terms 
and conditions as the Selectmen may determine, and further to se the minimum amount of $6.00.00 to be 
paid for such conveyance. 2/3 vote required. Article as presented. So voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to sell and convey to John Melvin the property shown as 
Assessors' Map 81, Parcel 60 upon receipt of a sum equal to all unpaid taxes, interest and expenses 
which have accrued upon the property to date of sale; or do anything in relation thereto. Motion was 
made and seconded to pass over this article due to the fact that the petitioner was not present. So 
voted to pass over. 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to Eugene L. and 
Joan D. Kritter a certain parcel of town-owned land shown as Parcel 55 on Assessors' Map 94, containing 
about 30,000 square feet subject to such terms and conditions as the Selectmen may determine, and 
further to set the minimum amount to be paid for such conveyance; or do anything in relation thereto. 
Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion.. "I move that the Town vote to authorize the Selectmen to 
sell and convey to Eugene L. and Joan D. Kritter a certain parcel of Town-owned land shown as Parcel 55 
on Assessors' Map 94, containing about 30,000 square feet, subject to the restriction, for the benefit 
of the grantor herein that the premises herein conveyed shall become part of the grantee's contiguous 
premises and shall only be used for the extension of a principal building structure currently existing 
and/or for any lawful use appurtenant thereto. Subject to the further restriction, for the benefit of 
the grantor herein that the premises herein conveyed shall not be divided or subdivided either with or 
without the grantee's contiguous premises. This restriction shall run with the land herein described 
and shall be binding on the grantee, his heirs and assigns and successors in title, all in accordance 
with law. The premises are conveyed subject to easements and restrictions of record insofar as the same 
are in force and applicable, and subject to such other terms and conditions as the Selectmen may 
determine and further to set minimum amount of $700.00 to be paid for such conveyance. 2/3 vote required. 
Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion so voted unanimously. 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to amend Article 6 as contained in the warrant of the Special 
Town Meeting held on October 3, 1977 amending the minimum price as voted thereon from $8,000 to $6,500. 
or do anything in relation thereto. Petitioner not present. Motion was made to pass over this article 



103 



and seconded. So voted. 



ARTICLE 36. To see if Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and Map by changing from Single Residence 
A to Neighborhood Business District the following described parcel of land, to wit: The land with the 
buildings thereon, situated in Wilmington, Middlesex County, Massachusetts, being Lots 33, 40, 45, 46 and 
47 as shown on a plan of land entitled "Plan No. 1, House Lots in Wilmington near the Boston and Maine 
Railroad Crossing, January 1849, made from a survey by I. A. Beard," duly recorded with Middlesex South 
Registry of Deeds in Plan Book 3B, Plan 89, a copy of which plan is filed in the Middlesex North Registry 
of Deeds in Plan Book 4 Plan 9, copies in the Southern District, and to which plan reference is hereby 
made for a more particular description: So much of the above described land as may have been taken by the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts for limited access to highway is excepted from the above grant, said taking 
being dated December 10, 1957 and recorded in the Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds in Book 1391 
at page 523, or do anything in relation thereto. Article by Petition. Finance Committee recommends 
disapproval based on the fact that the Petitioner was not present at the Finance Committee Public Hearing. 
Article 36.. Motion was made to pass over this article due to the fact that the petitioner was not present. 
Motion seconded and so voted. 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and Map of the Town of Wilmington by 
voting to rezone from Single Residence A. District to Industrial District the following described premises: 
The land in Wilmington situated on the Southerly side of Lowell Street and bounded as follows: Northerly 
by Lowell Street, Westerly by West Street, Southerly by the existing Industrial District, and Easterly by 
Route 93; or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee recommends approval. Article 37.. Motion 
by Joseph Courtney "I move that the Town vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and Map of the Town of Wilmington 
by voting to rezone from Single Residence A. District to General Business District, the following described 
premises: The land in Wilmington situated on the Southerly side of Lowell Street and bounded as follows: 
Northerly by Lowell Street, Westerly by West Street, Southerly by the existing Industrial District, and 
Easterly by Route 93. Mr. Courtney spoke in behalf of Mr. Fiorenza, the neighbors put up quite a bit of 
opposition to the change. 2/3 vote required. Motion lost. 37 Yes and 216 No. Moderator declared the 
motion lost. Article by petition. 



ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and Zoning Map of the Town of 
Wilmington by voting to rezone from Neighborhood Business District to Industrial District, the following 
described parcel of land to wit: Beginning at a point on the Southerly side of Concord Street at the 
intersection of said Concord Street and the Easterly side of the right-of-way of the Boston and Maine 
Railroad; thence proceeding in an Easterly direction along said Southerly side of Concord Street by land 
now or formerly of Lopez Realty Trust, Vincent A. Lopez and Felix A. Lopez, Trustees, to the point of 
intersection of said Southerly side of Concord Street and the Easterly side of Lopez Road, a private way 
shown on a plan entitled "Definitive Subdivision of land in Wilmington, Mass., Belonging to Lopez Realty 
Trust, dated July 1972," and noted as most recently "revised: October 20, 1972" and prepared by Roland H. 
Barnes & Co., Inc., Civil Engineers, 681 Main St., Waltham, Mass.; thence proceeding in a Southerly 
direction along said Easterly side of Lopez Road to the point of intersection of said Easterly side of 
Lopez Road with the Zoning District Boundary Line now existing between a Neighborhood Business District 
and an Industrial District; thence proceeding in a Westerly direction along said existing Zoning District 
Boundary Line to a point at the Easterly side of the Boston and Maine Railroad right-of-way; thence pro- 
ceeding in a Northerly direction along said Easterly side of the Boston and Maine right-of-way to the 
point of beginning; or do anything in relation thereto. Finance Committee recommends approval. Article 
38. .Motion by Joseph Courtney "I move that the Town vote to amend the Zoning By-Law and Map by Voting to 
rezone from Neighborhood Business District to Industrial District the following premises: As described in 
article. Neighbors in the are made their points of objection. 2/3 vote required. Vote 19 yes and 179 no. 
Motion lost. So declared by Moderator. Article by petition. 

ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to amend the Zoning By-Law of the Town of Wilmington so as 
to provide for PLANNED RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT DISTRICTS AND to regulate the same by adding the 
following sections and provisions to the aforesaid zoning By-Law. I. To add the new section to the 
Wilmington Zoning By-Law as follows: Section X. PLANNED RESIDENTIAL DEVELOPMENT DISTRICTS (PRD) 
X-l GENERAL: A. Special Permit for the development of a tract of land in such areas of the Town as 
the Town may from time to time designate as a Planned Residential Development subject to all requirements 
of this section. B. Purpose Planned Residential Development is an alternative pattern of land 
development to conventional subdivision, which allows large-scale development of a tract as a single 
entity by a developer. It is intended to encourage creative land development, with a greater mixture 
and diversity of housing types and diversity of housing types and configuration, as well as the conservatior 

104 



greater and more accessible open space. Single family detached dwellings, row or town houses, or other 
arrangements of dwelling units may be combined in a single PRD. Housing is permitted at somewhat greater 
densities in a portion of the PRD than is permitted in residential districts, and a portion of the land 
is set aside as common open space for the use of the residents of the PRD. Thus the overall population 
density of the Town is not significantly increased. In a PRD dwelling units should be constructed in 
appropriate clusters which are harmonious with neighborhood development and will not detract from the 
ecological and visual qualities of the environment. The overall site design and amenities should provide 
economic stability and enhance the quality of living for the residents of the development, the immediate 
neighborhood and Town generally. Attention, however, shall be given by the Board as to whether the 
proposed site design, development layout, number, type and design of housing constitute a suitable 
development for the neighborhood within which it is to be located. X-2 DEFINITIONS A. COMMON OPEN 
SPACE A parcel or parcels of land within the site designated for a Planned Residential Development, 
maintained and preserved for open space uses, and designed and intended for the use or enjoyment of 
residents of the Planned Residential Development, but not including parking areas or ways, public or 
private, and areas set aside as private yards, patios or gardens for the residents. Common Open Space 
may contain such complementary structures and improvements as are necessary and appropriate for the 
benefit and enjoyment of residents, occupants and guests of the Planned Residential Development. Such 
land shall have a shape, dimension, character and location suitable to assure its use for park recreation 
conservation or agricultural purposes by at least all the residents of the PRD. Provision shall be made 
so that the common land shall be readily accessible to the owners and occupants of the lots in the PRD, 
owned by a Home Owners' or Residents' Associ ation, or otherwise as the Planning Board may direct. In all 
cases a perpetual restriction of the type described in G.L.C. 184 Sec. 31 (including future amendments 
thereto and corresponding provisions of future laws) running to or enforceable by the Town shall be 
recorded in respect to such land. Such restriction shall provide that the Common Open Space shall be 
retained in perpetuity for one or more of the following uses: conservation, agriculture, recreation or 
park. Such restriction shall be in such form and substance as the Board of Appeals shall prescribe and 
may contain such additional restrictions on development and use of the common land as the Board of Appeals 
may deem appropriate. B. DEVELOPER The person, persons, corporation, trust, firm or partnership or 
other legal entity who or which is (are) the legal or beneficial owner(s) of all the land proposed to be 
included in a PRD and who or which is (are) charged with the execution of a PRD under this By-Law. The 
holder of an option or contract to purchase or other person having an enforceable proprietary interest 
in such land, shall be deemed to be a Developer for the purposes of this By-law. C. DWELLING UNIT 
One or more rooms providing complete living facilities for one family, including equipment for cooking 
or provisions for the same, and including rooms for living, sleeping and eating. D. FACADE The 
principal face of a building; in a building with exterior dwelling units with an interior corridor 
therein, the front and rear walls of the building shall be called the Facade. E. FAMILY (1) One or 
more persons related by blood or marriage and including not more than four additional persons, or (2) not 
more than five unrelated persons, occupying a dwelling unit and living as a single housekeeping unit. 
F. FIRE PROTECTION AREA - The open space between a building in a Planned Residential Development and a 
line parallel to and twenty (20) feet equidistant from any such building, available for emergency access, 
within which no building or structure may be erected without written permission from the Chief of the 
Wilmington Fire Department. G. HOME OWNERS' OR RESIDENT' ASSOCIATION A legal organization approved 
by the Board of Appeals composed of all resident owners in a Planned Residential Development responsible 
for owning or maintaining common property, providing for compulsory membership for such residents, 
equitable voting rights and effective participation opportunities. H. PRINCIPAL ACCESS DRIVEWAY - 
A service road or driveway, other than a public way or a way approved in accordance with the Subdivision 
Control Law, which provides the principal access for vehicles to the buildings in the PRD. 1. REQUIRED 
UTILITIES Water, sewer, storm drainage, telephone, electricity, gas, street lights, and fire alarm 
systems unless otherwise specified by the Board of Appeals. J. ROW OR TOWN HOUSES Attached single 
family dwellings with vertical and horizontal separating fire walls between dwelling units, and in 
buildings containing not over ten (10) dwelling units and with a facade not over Two Hundred and Forty 
(240) feet in length K. SITE PLAN A plat of property and provision in written and graphic form, 
comparable to a Preliminary Subdivision Plan, for development of a Planned Residential Development, 
relating to the use, location and bulk of buildings and other structures, intensity of use or density 
of development, private access driveways or streets, ways and parking facilities, common open space, 
utilities and appropriate covenants, easements and restrictions applying thereto. L. WETLANDS All lands 
protected by the Wetlands Protection Act, G.L. C. 131, Sec. 40. X-3 STANDARDS A. MINIMUM TRACT SIZE 
Any and every Planned Residential Development shall occupy an area of land of not less than ten (10) 
acres controlled and to be developed by a Developer as a single entity under the provisions of this 
section. However nothing shall prevent individual ownership of a dwelling unit within a PRD. 
B. PERMITTED USES - The Board of Appeals may issue a Special Permit for a Planned Residential 
Development as Specified in Section VTII-4B, as modified by the provisions stated below in this section. 



105 



1 



1. Any use permitted without appeal in a Rural District or in a Single Residence A or Single Residence 
B District, as permitted therein, and Row or Town Houses, without regard to form of ownership, subject 
to the prvisions stated below. 2. Accessory uses incidental to the principal uses indicated above. 

3. Common Open Space with incidental outdoor amusement or recreation uses devoted to or related to 
court games hiking, skating or swimming, but primarily for the use of residents or guests thereof in 
said district. 4. Parking spaces as required in Paragraph C. 5 below. C. CONDITIONS Any or all such, 
uses shall be permitted in a Planned Residential Development only subject to the following conditions and 
in accordance with the procedure stated in Subsection 4 below. 1. Each dwelling unit shall have 
individual cooking facilities. 2. No living quarters shall be permitted above three stories in height 
nor below the mean finished grade. 3. The Developer shall provide all Required Utilities for the use 

of all owners and occupants of dwelling units in the PRD, and utility wires shall be installed undergroun j 
in conformity with Subdivision Rules and Regulations currently in effect in the Town of Wilmington. 

4. No building facade, detached or semi-detached, shall exceed two hundred and forty (240) feet in 
length. 5. The Developer shall provide one and one-half (1%) off-street parking spaces for each dwell- 
ing unit in the PRD project. Entrance and exit driveways, curbs, drainage, surfacing, lighting and 
screening, shall conform with the design and improvement requirements stated in Section IV-3 of this 
By-Law. The Developer shall also provide screening of densely planted shrubs, trees or other suitable 
planting at least four (4) feet wide and four (4) feet high, between a parking area containing more than 
10 spaces and dwelling units within the PRD. 6. The Developer shall provide Principal Access Driveways. 
7. Bonds or Covenants to insure completion of the PRD shall be provided by the Developer to the extent 
that the Board of Appeals requires. 8. The Developer shall offer and convey to the Town Common Open 
Space by dedication for park or open space use or by a perpetual restriction of the type described in 
G.L. C. 184, Sec. 31 (including future amendments thereto and corresponding provisions of future laws) 
running to or enforceable by the Town which shall be recorded in respect to such land. 9. The Developer 
shall establish a Home Owners' or Residents' Association for the ownership and maintenance of any Common 
Open Space not dedicated to public use. Such organization shall not be dissolved nor shall it dispose 
of any Common Open Space, by sale or otherwise (except to an organization conceived and established to 
own and maintain the Common Open Space), without first offering to dedicate the same to the town or other 
government agency. In the event that the organization established to own and maintain Common Open Space 
shall fail to maintain it in reasonable order and condition, the Board of Selectmen may serve written 
notice of such failure upon such organization or upon the residents within or owners of the Planned 
Residential Development and shall include a demand for correction within thirty (30) days and shall state 
the date, time and place of a hearing thereof which shall be held within fourteen (14) days of the notice 
If the dif iciencies i are not corrected or the Board's demand modified, the Town acting through the Board 
of Selectmen may enter upon the Common Open Space and maintain the same for a period of one (1) year. 
Before the expiration of the year, a second public hearing shall be called by the Board, at which time 
the organization or the residents shall show cause why such maintenance should not continue for a 
succeeding year. If the Board determines that the need for Town maintenance no longer exists, the Board 
shall cease to maintain the Common Open Space. All costs incurred by the Town shall be assessed against 
the properties within the Planned Residential Development and shall become a lien on those properties 
which may be collected and enforced in the manner fixed by law for the collection of taxes. Notice of 
lien shall be recorded in the Registry of Deeds. D. PERMISSIBLE DENSITY - Subject to the limitations 
stated below, the number of dwelling units permitted within any PRD shall be determined by the Board to 
assure compliance with the purposes of the Planned Residential Development. 1. The total number of 
dwelling units shall not exceed the product of four (4) times the number of acres in the total PRD tract; 
provided that no land shall be included which at the time of the submission of the application under this 
Section is subject to a perpetual restriction of the type described in G.L.C. 184, Sec. 31 or any 
restriction similar thereto. 2. The area covered by buildings and structures, excluding recreational 
buildings in the Common Open Space, shall not exceed twenty- five (25) percent of the total PRD tract. 

3. Common Open Space shall be provided with an area equal to or exceeding 2,000 feet per dwelling unit 
or comprising 257o of the total area of the overall PRD tract, whichever is greater. No more than fifty 
(50) percent of the Common Open Space actually provided may be Wetlands, the surface of any lake or pond, 
or in a Flood Plain District. 4. There shall be no minimum lot area, frontage or yard requirements 
within a PRD. However, no building shall be erected within thirty (30) feet of a public way or boundary 
line of the PRD and each building shall have a Fire Protection surrounding it. 5. No tract shown on a 
plan for which a PRD permit is granted under this Article may be further subdivided, and a notation to 
this effect shall be shown on the plan. X-4 PROCEDURE FOR APPROVAL A. The Board of Appeals may grant 
a special permit for a Planned Residential Development according to the applicable procedures of Section 
VIII-4 of this By-Law, as modified below: 1. Developers seeking a special permit to establish a Planned 
Residential Development under this Section shall file a written application therefor by delivery or 
registered mail, with return receipt requested with the Clerk of the Board of Appeals with six (6) copies 
of each Site Plan and Written Statement covering: (a) the location and size of the site and the nature 



106 



of the Developer's interest in the land proposed to be developed; (b) the density of land use to be 
allocated to parts of the site to be developed; (c) the location and size of any Common Open Space and 
the form of organization proposed to own and maintain any Common Open Space; (d) the uses of land and 
buildings and the approximate height, bulk and location of buildings and other structures; (e) the 
proposals for the disposition of sanitary waste and storm water; (f) the substance of covenants, grants 
of easements or other restrictions proposed to be imposed upon the use of the land, buildings and 
structures including proposed easements or grants for public utilities; (g) the provisions for vehicular 
access, parking of vehicles, and the location and width of proposed streets, public ways and private 
access driveways (h) the proposals for screening and topographical changes; and (i) in the case of Plans 
which call for the development over a period of years, a schedule showing the proposed construction 
schedules and approximate dates, within which applications for final approval of all sections of the 
Planned Residential Development are intended to be filed. The Clerk shall within five days transmit two 
copies of said application and site plan to the Planning Board and one copy of said application and site 
plan to the Town Clerk. If submission is by delivery, the Clerk (or other authorized person) shall give 
a written receipt therefor, indicating the date of such transmission. The Board of Appeals shall hold 
a public hearing with regard to said application within sixty- five (65) days of the filing thereof. 
2. The Planning Board shall consider the application and site plan and shall submit, within forty- five 
(45) days, a written report thereon with a recommendation for or against final approval of the application 
together with recommendations for modifications, restrictions or requirements to be imposed as a condition 
of granting the special permit to the Board of Appeals. (a) The Planning Board shall set forth with 
particularity in what respects the Plan would or would not be in the public interest including but not 
limited to findings of fact and conclusions on the following: (i) In what respects the Plan is or is not 
consistant with the statement of objectives of a Planned Residential Development (Section X-l.B.) and of 
the General Plan for the Town. (ii) The extent to which the Plan departs from zoning and sub-division 
regulations otherwise applicable to the subject property, including but not limited to density, bulk and 
use, and the reasons why such departures are or are not deemed to be in the public interest. (iii) The 
purpose, location, uses and amount of the Common Open Space in the Planned Residential Development, the 
reliability of the proposals for maintenance, preservation, and conservation of the Common Open Space, 
and the adequacy or inadequacy of the amount and purpose of the Common Open Space as related to the proposed 
density and type of residential development. (iv) The physical design of the Plan including the physical 
design and use of buildings, the manner in which said design does or does not make adequate provision for 
public service, provide adequate access and control over vehicular traffic, and parking, provide adequate 
grading, landscaping and screening, and further the amenities of light and air, recreation and visual 
enjoyment. (v) The relationship, beneficial or adverse, of the proposed Planned Residential Development 
to the neighborhood in which it is proposed to be established; and (vi) In the case of a Plan which 
proposed development over a period of years, the sufficiency of the terms and conditions intended to 
protect the interests of the public and of the residents of the Planned Residential Development in the 
integrity of the Plan. (b) The Planning Board shall also consult with the Town Engineer in making findings 
of fact and conclusions on the following: (i) Access, drainage, waste disposal, topographic changes, 
specifications for paving, drains, water, etc. 3. The Board of Appeals shall take final action on an 
application and site plan within ninety (90) days after the filing thereof with the Clerk by the Developer. 
However, the Board of Appeals shall not make a finding and determination upon an application until it has 
received the final written reports of the Planning Board thereon or forty- five (45) days shall have elapsed 
since the transmittal of said copies of the application and site plan to the Planning Board without such 
reports being submitted. (a) If the Board of Appeals shall fail to take final action as aforesaid within 
ninety (90) days, the Board of Appeals shall be deemed to have made a finding and determination that the 
proposed site Plan is adequate for the reasonable protection of public safety and health in the proposed 
use of the site. (b) The final action by the Board of Appeals shall consist of either (i) a finding 
and determination that the proposed site plan is adequate for the reasonable protection of public safety 
and health in the proposed use of the site, or (ii) a written denial of the application and site plan 
for such finding and determination, stating in detail the reasons for said denial and wherein any elements 
in and any particular features of the application and site plan are deemed to be inadequate, and further 
specifying in detail each and every change and modification in said application and site plan together 
with the reasons therefor, which if accepted by the applicant and incorporated in or applied to said 
application and site plan, would result in a finding and determination by the Board of Appeals that said 
application and site plan is adequate for the reasonable protection of public safety and health in the 
proposed use of the site. (c) The Board of Appeals shall give due consideration to the report of the 
Planning Board and where the decision of the Board of Appeals differs from the recommendations of the 
Planning Board, the Board of Appeals shall set forth in detail the reasons and grounds for such difference, 
(d) In the event the Board of Appeals makes such finding and determination that the proposed plan is adequate 



107 



reasonable protection of public safety and health in the proposed use of the site, such use, extension 
erection, or enlargement shall be carried on only in essential conformity with the application and site 
plan on the basis of which the said finding and determination is made. (e) The Board of Appeals may, in 
its discretion instead of denying the application and site plan, make said finding and determination 
subject to stated reasonable conditions and restrictions in writing, which, if assented to by the 
applicant in writing, shall be deemed to have been incorporated into and made a part of the application 
and site plan, without requiring the applicant to submit or resubmit a modified or amended application 
and site plan. (f) The period within which final action shall be taken may be extended for a definite 
period by mutual consent of the Board of Appeals and the applicant. In the event the Board of Appeals 
determines that a site plan is inadequate to permit it to make a finding and determination, it may, in 
its descretion, instead of denying the application, extend the period to a later date to permit the 
applicant to submit a revised site plan or application, provided, however, that such period is extended 
to a day certain by mutual consent. Periods of extensions shall not exceed a total of six (6) months 
without re-submission. (g) The Board of Appeals shall file with its records a written report of its 
final action on each application, with reasons therefor. A copy of each report shall also be filed with 
the Town Clerk, the Planning Board, the Town Engineer, the Building Inspector and the Board of Selectmen. 
A copy of each application and its accompanying site plan shall likewise be filed with the Building 
Inspector. (h) Prior to submission of the application, the applicant shall have made application for 
all licenses incidental to the proposed accessory uses. II. To add the following amendments to the 
Wilmington Zoning By-Law: A. To add to Section I, subsection 1-2, paragraph A thereof, under the 
caption "ESTABLISHMENT AND LOCATION OF DISTRICTS" the following new district: 9. Planned Residential 
Development Districts (PRD) . B. To add to Section I, subsection 1-2 paragraph A thereof, following the 
first two words of the first sentence, "Said Districts," add, "except the Planned Residential Develop- 
ment district,". C. To add to Section I, subsection 1-2, a new paragraph as follows: "E. The location 
of the Planned Residential Development District shall be that land so classified from time to time by 
the Town." D. To delete from Section IV, Subsection IV-4 thereof, the period at the end of the first 
sentence, substitute a comma therefor, and add the following: "or a Planned Residential Development 
District". E. To add to Section V, Subsection V-l thereof, under the caption "HEIGHT, AREA AND YARD 
REGULATIONS", the following new schedule of Requirements: 1. Under the heading "District" the words 
"Planned Residential Development District (PRD)"; 2. Under all of the remaining headings, the words 
"As allowed in Section X" F. To add to Section VIII, subsection VIII-2B, in the final paragraph, 
following "III-5B" and before "and" the following: "X". G. To add to Section VIII, subsection VIII-4B, 
the following: At the end of paragraph 2a, delete the "and" between "III-6B" and "III-6.C.1." and 
substitute a comma therefor, delete the period, substitute a comma therefor, and add "and X". or do 
anything in relation thereto. (By Petition) No recommendation pending the changes in this Article to 
be made on Town Meeting floor. Article No. 39. Motion by Paul K. Butt "I move to refer to the 

Planning Board for further study and response at the next Town Meeting, Special or Annual." Motion 
seconded and so voted to pass over this article. 

ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to make as part of the Planned Residential Development District 
and so classify the land on and off of Salem Street, containing 21.5 acres, more or less, shown as 
lot 4Z on Sheet 96 of the Town of Wilmington Property Map or do anything in relation thereto. (By 
Petition) Finance Committee has no recommendation until Article 39 has been voted on. Article 40. 
Motion to pass over this article. Seconded and so voted. 

The Moderator declared there being no further business to come before the Annual Town Meeting, that 
said meeting is adjourned. Meeting adjorned at 11:40 p.m. 

There were 570 in attendance at the afternoon session and 442 in attendance in the evening. 

ARTICLES VOTED BY TAXATION $202,600. 

Attest: (Mrs.) Priscilla R. Ward 

Town Clerk 
Wilmington, Mass. 



108 



STATE PRIMARY - WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
HIGH SCHOOL GYMNASIUM, CHURCH STREET - SEPTEMBER 19, 1978 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Wilmington: 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabitants 
of said town who are qualified to vote in Primaries to meet in the High School Gymnasium, Church Street, 
Tuesday, the nineteenth day of September, 1978 at ten o'clock a.m. for the following purposes: 

To cast their votes in the State Primary for the nomination of candidates of political parties for the 
following offices: Senator in Congress; Governor; Lti. Governor; Attorney General; Secretary; Treasurer 
Auditor; Representative in Congress, 5th Congressional District; Councillor, 3rd Councillor District; 
Senator in General Court, 1st Essex & Middlesex Sen. District; Representative in General Court, Precincts 
l-2-4-5-6-20th Representative District; Precinct 3 - 21st Representative District; District Attorney, 
Middlesex District; Register of Probate and Insolvency, Middlesex County; County Commissioner, Middlesex 
County; County Treasurer, Middlesex County. 

The polls will be open from 10:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your doings thereon at the time and place of said 
meeting. 

Given under our hands this first day of September, A.D. 1978. Selectmen of the Town of Wilmington: 

s/Aldo A. Caira 
s/James F. Banda 
s/Robert J. Cain 
s/A. John Imbimbo 

Attest: s/Rocco V. DePasquale 

At 9:45 a.m. on September 19, 1978 the Town Clerk read the Town Warrant. All the machines in the (6) 
precincts were ready and at 10:00 a.m. the Town Clerk declared the polls were open. Zero sheets were 
removed from all 25 machines and placed outside the railing for all candidates to see. 

All the totals from the 25 voting machines plus 73 absentee ballots and 1 paper ballot for the American 
party were recorded and declaration thereof made, as by law is directed, and were for the following 
namely: 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



REPUBLICAN PARTY 



Senator in Congress 

Kathleen Sullivan Alioto 

Paul Guzzi 

Elaine Noble 

Howard Phillips 

Paul E. Tsongas 

Blanks 

Governor 

Michael S. Dukakis 
Barbara Ackermann 
Edward J . King 
Blanks 



427 
848 
135 
165 

1425 
146 

3146 

1200 
163 

1674 
109 

3146 



Senator in Congress 
Edward W. Brooke 
Avi Nelson 
Blanks 



Governor 

Francis W. Hatch, Jr. 
Edward F. King 



Other 
Blanks 



273 
392 
5_ 

670 



304 
327 
1 
38 
670 



Lieutenant Governor 



Thomas P. 
Blanks 



O'Neill III 



2225 
921 
3146 



Lieutenant Governor 
William I. Cowin 
Peter L. McDowell 
Blanks 



274 
216 
180 
670 



109 



DEMOCRATIC PARTY 



REPUBLICAN PARTY 



Attorney General 

Francis X. Bellotti 
Blanks 



2295 
851 
3146 



Attorney General 
William F. Weld 
Blanks 



347 
323 
670 



Secretary 

Michael Joseph Connolly 
David E. Crosby 
John Fulham 

William James Galvin, Jr. 
James W. Hennigan Jr. 
Lois G. Pines 
Anthony J. Vigliotti 
Blanks 

Treasurer 

Robert Q. Crane 
Lawrence E. Blacke 
Paul R. Cacchiotti 
Lawrence S . DiCara 
Thomas D. Lopes 
Dayce Philip Moore 
Blanks 

Auditor 

Thaddeus Buczko 
Peter G. Meade 
Blanks 

Representative in Congress 
Ronald A. Burba 
Robert F. Hatem 
John K. Mar key 
Michael E. McLaughlin 
Raymond F. Rourke 
James M. Shannon 
Blanks 



Councillo r 
John F. 
Blanks 



Markey 



Senator in General Court 
Robert J. Cain 
Joseph V. Gracy 
Paul F. Jackman 
Regina Villa 
Blanks 

Representative in General Court 
(20th Middlesex) 

James R. Miceli 

Frank A. Antonelli 

Paul Harold Sullivan 

Blanks 



975 
203 
142 
385 
158 
445 
154 
684 
3146 

1371 
238 
312 
611 
73 
70 
471 
3146 

1580 
1030 
536 
3146 

47 
860 

1141 
454 
101 
266 
277 

3146 

1977 
1169 
3146 

2120 
438 
73 
93 
422 
3146 



2214 
190 
247 

78 

2729 



Secretary 

John W. Sears 
Blanks 



Treasurer 

Lewis W. Crampton 
Blanks 



Auditor 

William A. Casey 

Blanks 

Others 

Representative in Congress 
John J. Buckley 
Nicholas D. Rizzo 
Blanks 
Others 



Councillor 

No candidates 
Blanks 

Senator in General Court 



Nicola A. 
Robert C. 
Blanks 



Barletta 
Buell 



Representative in General Court 
(20th Middlesex) 
No candidates 
Blanks 



450 
220 
670 



377 
298 
670 



425 
244 

1 

670 

344 
246 
78 
__2 
670 



670 
670 

224 
304 
142 
670 



670 
670 



110 



State Primary (continued) 

DEMOCRATIC PARTY 

Representative in General Court 

(21st Middlesex) 

Harold J. Allen, Jr. 

Michael J. Barrett 

Stephen G. Viegas 

Blanks 

District Attorney 

John J. Droney 

Guy A. Carbone 

L. Scott Harshbarger 

Blanks 

Register of Probate and Insolvency 

Paul J. Cavanaugh 

Edward J. Bishop Jr. 

Francis X. Donahue 

Leonard F. Deacon Doyle 

John R. Harvey 

Ralph R. Hogan 

Blanks 

County Commissioner 
John J . Danehy 
William C. Chisholm Jr. 
Michael T. Cunningham 
Bernard J. Hennessy 
Blanks 

County Treasure r 
Rocco J. Antonelli 
James F. Brennan 
Thomas F. Coughlin 
Donald A. Fantini 
Charles A. Gallagher 
Richard D. Mahoney 
John J . Twomey 
Blanks 



132 
156 
66 
63 
417 

1288 
382 
899 
577 

3146 

846 
207 
362 
100 

1047 
40 
544 

3146 

1026 
441 
651 
134 
894 

3146 

773 
473 
287 
293 
295 
103 
291 
631 
3146 



REPUBLICAN PARTY 

Representative in General Court 
(21st Middlesex) 
Nils L. Nordberg 
Blanks 



District Attorney 
No Candidate 
Blanks 



Register of Probate and Insolvency 

No Candidates 

Blanks 



93 
577 
670 



670 
670 



670 
670 



County Commissioner 
No Candidates 
Blanks 



County Treasurer 
No Candidates 
Blanks 



670 
670 



670 
670 



AMERICAN PARTY 
The American Party ballot had no candidates. 

One American Party voter, voted but only for the following offices: 



Lieutenant Governor 

Fantini 

Blanks 



Representative in General Court 

Sullivan 

Blanks 

Register of Probate and Insolvency 

J . Harvey 

Blanks 



111 



State Primary (continued) 

The Town Clerk read the vote totals to the public about 10:45 p.m. and the election then adjourned. 

Attest: (Mrs) Priscilla R. Ward 

Town Clerk 
Wilmington, Mass. 

STATE ELECTION - WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
HIGH SCHOOL GYMNASIUM, CHURCH STREET - NOVEMBER 7, 1978 

To either of the Constables of the Town of Wilmington: 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth you are hereby required to notify and warn the inhabitants 
of said town who are qualified to vote in elections to vote at the polling place listed below on Tuesday, 
the seventh day of November 1978 from 6:00 a.m. to 8:00 p.m. for the following purposes: 

To cast their votes in the State Election for the election of candidates for the following offices: 
Senator in Congress; Governor; Lieutenant Governor; Attorney General; Secretary; Treasurer; Auditor; 
Representative in Congress, 5th Congressional District; Councillor, 3rd Councillor District; Senator 
in General Court, 1st Essex & Middlesex Senatorial District; Representative in General Court, Precincts 
1-2-4-5-6 - 20th Representative District; Precinct 3 - 21st Representative District; District Attorney; 
Middlesex District; Registry of Probate and Insolvency, Middlesex County; County Commissioner, Middlesex 
County (except for Nantucket & Suffolk Counties); County Treasurer, Middlesex County; (except f or 
Nantucket & Suffolk Counties) 

BALLOT QUESTIONS (9) 

1. Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the Constitution summarized below? 

2. Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the Constitution summarized below? 

3. Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the Constitution summarized below? 

4. Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the Constitution summarized below? 

5. Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the Constitution summarized below? 

6. Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the Constitution summarized below? 

7. Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the Constitution summarized below? 

8. "Shall the Town grant licenses for the sale of alcoholic beverages to be consumed on the premises 
to legally chartered clubs within the boundries of said town?" 

9. "Shall the Senator from his District be instructed to vote to approve the passage of a bill 
requiring the reduction and limitation of local property taxes by substituting revenue from 
State taxes, and providing that all state and local taxes combined shall not take a larger 
percentage of total personal income in Massachusetts than the average percentage taken in the 
three-year period immediately preceding approval?" 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with your doings thereon at the time and place of 
said meeting. 

Given under our hands this 16th day of October, A.D., 1978. Selectmen of the Town of Wilmington: 

s/Aldo A. Caira 
S /James F. Banda 
s/Robert J. Cain 
s/A. John Imbimbo 
s/Rocco V. DePasquale 



Attest: Priscilla R. Ward 

Town Clerk 
Wilmington, Mass. 



112 



(State Election continued) 



The Town Clerk, Priscilla R. Ward ,read the above Warrant at 5:45 a.m. November 7, 1978. The polls were 
opened at 6:00 a.m. The polls were closed at 8:00 p.m. It was 8:57 p.m. before the last voters cast 
their vote. 

All of the totals from the twenty-five (25) machines plus the absentee ballots were recorded and 
declaration thereof made, as by law is directed and were for the following: 



SENATOR IN CONGRESS 



Edward W. Brooke - Republican 
Paul E. Tsongas - Democratic 
Others 
Blanks 



VOTE 
2083 
3934 
3 

123 
6143 



GOVERNOR - LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR 

Hatch and Cowin - Republican 
King and O'Neill - Democratic 
Others 
Blanks 



2247 
3665 

231 
6143 



ATTORNEY GENERAL 

Francis X, 
William F. 
Others 
Blanks 



Bellotti - Democratic 
Weld - Republican 



4917 
1034 

192 
6143 



SECRETARY 



Michael Joseph Connolly - Democratic 

John W. Sears - Republican 

Others 

Blanks 



3434 
2100 

609 
6143 



TREASURER 



Robert Q. Crane - Democratic 
Lewis S. W. Crampton - Republican 
Others 
Blanks 



3574 
2074 

495 
6143 



AUDITOR 



Thaddeus Buczko - Democratic 
Timothy F. O'Brien- Republican 
Others 
Blanks 



3687 
1880 

576 
6143 



REPRESENTATIVE IN CONGRESS (Fifth District) 
John J. Buckley - Republican 
James M. Shannon - Democratic 
James J. Gaffney III - Independent 
Others 
Blanks 



2015 
2322 
1398 

408 
6143 



113 



(State Election continued) 



COUNCILLOR (Fifth District) 

John F. Markey - Democratic 

Others 

Blanks 



SENATOR IN GENERAL COURT (First Essex & Middlesex District) 
Robert C. Buell - Republican 
Robert J. Cain - Democratic 
Others 
Blanks 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT (Twentieth Middlesex District) 



VOTE 
4468 

1675 



6143 



1121 
4633 

389 



James R. 

Others 

Blanks 



Miceli - Democratic 



6143 

4497 
673 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT (Twenty-first Middlesex District) 
Nils L. Nordberg - Republican 
Michael J. Barrett - Democratic 
Others 
Blanks 



DISTRICT ATTORNEY (Northern District) 



5170 



330 
565 



78 



John J. Droney - Democratic 

Others 

Blanks 



REGISTER OF PROBATE AND INSOLVENCY (Middlesex County) 
Paul J. Cavanaugh - Democratic 
Robert V. Campo - Independent 
Others 
Blanks 



COUNTY COMMISSIONER (Middlesex County) 



973 

3959 
2184 



John L. 

Others 

Blanks 



Danehy - Democratic 



COUNTY TREASURER (Middlesex County) 

Rocco J. Antonelli - Democratic 
S. Lester Ralph - Independent 
Others 
Blanks 



6143 



3861 
1140 

1142 
6143 



4056 

2087 
6143 



3233 
2088 

822 
6143 



QUESTION #1 - Proposed Amendment to the Constitution 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the Constitution summarized below, which was 
approved by the General Court in joint sessions of the House of Representatives and Senate on May 28,1975, 
by a vote of 220-53, and on September 7, 1977, by a vote of 243-20? 

Summary 

The proposed constitutional amendment would permit the legislature to establish as many as four different 



114 



(State Election continued) 

classes of real property for tax purposes. Property in any one class would be required to be assessed, 
rated and taxed proportionately but property in different classes could be assessed, rated and taxed 
differently. The legislature could grant reasonable exemptions. The constitution presently requires 
all property (other than wild lands, forest lands, and certain agricultural and horticultural lands) to 
be assessed and rated equally at full value for tax purposes. 

Yes 3936 
No 1906 
Blanks 301 

6143 

Question #2 - Proposed Amendment to the Constitution 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the Constitution summarized below, which was 
approved by the General Court in joint sessions of the House of Representatives and Senate on May 28, 1975, 
by a vote of 267-3, and on August 10, 1977, by a vote of 250-1? 

Summary 

The proposed constitutional amendment would allow a governor who had not served in the preceding year as 
governor to submit a proposed budget to the legislature within eight weeks of the beginning of the legisla- 
tive session. A governor who had served in the preceding year would still be required to submit a proposed 
budget within three weeks of the beginning of a legislative session. 

Yes 3386 
No 1909 
Blanks 848 

6143 

Question #3 - Proposed Amendment to the Constitution 

Do you approve' of the adoption of an amendment to the Constitution summarized below, which was 
approved by the General Court in joint sessions of the House of Representatives and Senate on June 26,1976, 
by a vote of 244-6, and on August 10, 1977, by a vote of 253-1? 

Summary 

The proposed constitutional amendment would require the Secretary of the Commonwealth to send information 
about questions that will appear on the state election ballot to each person eligible to vote in the 
Commonwealth, or to every residence in the Commonwealth where one or more eligible voters live. Presently, 
the Constitution requires the Secretary to send this information to each registered voter in the Common- 
wealth. 

Yes 3623 
No 1650 
Blanks 870 

6143 

Question #4 - Proposed Amendment to the Constitution 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the Constitution summarized below, which was 
approved by the General Court in joint sessions of the House of Representatives and Senate on May 26, 1976, 
by a vote of 266-0, and on August 10, 1977, by a vote of 258-0? 

Summary 

The proposed constitutional amendment would require that in the taking of the state census, residence be 
determined in accordance with the standards used by the United States when taking the federal census. Under 
the federal standards, residence is based upon where a person spends most of his or her time whereas under 
present state standards residence is based upon legal domicile. The standards would be subject to any 
exceptions which the legislature might enact. 

Yes 3244 
No 1894 
Blanks 1005 

6143 



115 



(State Election continued) 



Question #5 - Proposed Amendment to the Constitution 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the Constitution summarized below, which was 
approved by the General Court in joint sessions of the House of Representatives and Senate on May 26, 1976 
by a vote of 260-1, and on August 10, 1977, by a vote of 255-0? 

Summary 

The proposed constitutional amendment would allow a local charter commission 18 months after its election 
to prepare a charter or charter revision for submission to the voters of a city or town. Presently, the 
constitution provides that the charter or charter revision be prepared within 10 months of the election of 
the charter commission. 



Yes 2137 
No 2813 
Blanks 1193 

6143 

Question #6 - Proposed Amendment to the Constitution 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the Constitution summarized below, which was 
approved by the General Court in joint sessions of the House of Representatives and Senate on June 11, 197.' 
by a vote of 175-73, and on September 7, 1977, by a vote of 173-90? 

Summary 

The proposed constitutional amendment would provide that a student could neither be assigned to nor denied 
admittance to a public school on the basis of race, color, national origin or creed. 

Yes 3757 
No 1555 
Blanks 831 

6143 

Question #7 - Proposed Amendment to the Constitution 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment to the Constitution summarized below, which was 
approved by the General Court in joint sessions of the House of Representatives and Senate on August 11, 
1976, by a vote of 248-5, and on May 24, 1978 by a vote of 257-0? 

Summary 

The proposed constitutional amendment would give the legislature the power to establish a different method 
of property taxation for land which is used for recreational purposes and for land preserved in its natural 
state. It would add these two categories to the existing constitutional provision which allows the 
legislature to tax wild and forest land differently. The amendment's stated purpose is to develop and 
conserve natural resources and the environmental benefits of recreational land. 



Yes 2817 
No 2367 
Blanks 959 

6143 

Question #8 F "Shall the Town of Wilmington grant licenses for the sale of alcoholic beverages to be 
consumed on the premises to legally chartered clubs within the boundaries of said town?" 

Yes 3513 
No 1749 
Blanks 881 

6143 

Question #9 - "Shall the Senator from this District be instructed to vote to approve the passage of a 
bill requiring the reduction and limitation of local property taxes by substituting revenue from state 
taxes, and providing that all state and local taxes combined shall not take a larger percentage of the 
total personal income in Massachusetts than the average percentage taken in the three- year period 
immediately preceding approval?" This Question is Non-Binding. 



116 



(State Election continued) 



Question #9 (continued) 

Yes 
No 

Blanks 



3708 
897 
1538 
6143 



Total number of voters 6,143 which represents 66.2% of the registered voters. The Town Clerk closed the 
outer doors of the High School Gymnasium at 8:00 P.M. with approximately 500 voters waiting inside to vote 
The final voter cast his vote at 8:57 P.M. The results were read at 10:45 P.M. 



Attest: 



(Mrs.) Priscilla R. Ward 
Town Clerk 
Wilmington, Mass. 



WARRANT SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - DECEMBER 18, 1978 
TO: The Constable of the Town of Wilmington: 

GREETINGS: In the name of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and in the manner prescribed by the revised 
By-Laws of said Town, you are hereby directed to notify and warn the inhabitants of the Town qualifed to 
vote in Town affairs to meet and assemble at the High School, Barrows Auditorium, in said Town of 
Wilmington, on Monday, the eighteenth day of December A.D. 1978 at 7:30 p.m., then and there to act on 
the following articles: 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to transfer Town-owned Salem St. land acquired for the construc- 
tion of a public school or schools to the care, custody, management and control of the Board of Selectmen 
said land to be used for open space and recreational purposes; or do anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to raise and appropriate the sum of $300,000.00 for the purpose 
of design and construction of phase One of the Salem Street Recreation Development area for the construc- 
tion of municipal outdoor recreational and athletic facilities with said construction cost estimated and 
expected to be reimbursed one-half or $150,000.00, under a federal grant, the federal Land and Conserva- 
tion Act of 1965 through the Executive Office of Environmental Affairs, Commonwealth of Massachusetts; 
and to determine how the appropriation shall be raised, whether by transfer from available funds, by 
borrowing or otherwise for said design and construction; or do anything in relation thereto. 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to Harrison H. 
Fogg and JoAnn Fogg a certain parcel of Town-owned land shown as parcel 37 on Assessor's Map 33, bound 
and described as follows: 

Southerly by Houghton Road 125 feet; westerly by lot 42 180 feet; northerly by lots 10-14, 125 
feet; easterly by lot 36, 180 feet; containing 22,500 square feet being Block G lots 37 - 41 inclusive, 
all as shown on a plan entitled: Ye Pine Woods, Plan showing Subdivision of house lots fromerly owned 
by Ed. Blanchard in Wilmington, Mass. Scale 1 in. = 100 ft., June 1928 Dana F. Perkins, Civil Engineer 
and Surveyor, Reading, Mass, subject to such terms and conditions as the Selectmen may determine, and 
further to set the minimum amount to be paid for such conveyance, or do anything in relation thereto. 
(By Petition) 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to Edward D. 
Harrison a certain parcel of Town-owned land shown as Parcel 8 on Assessors' Map 19, bound and described 
as follows: 

Northwesterly by Aldrich Road, 160.72 feet; Northeasterly by lots 170,211 and 254, 317.8 feet; 
Southeasterly by land of Buttaro, 164.16 feet; Southwesterly by lots 285, 263, 220 and 161, 347.6 feet; 
being lots 162 - 169 inclusive, 212 - 219 inclusive, 255 - 262 inclusive, and 284, containing 52,822 
square feet, all as shown on a plan entitled "Plan No. 2, Home Park, Wilmington, Mass., owned by J.W. 
Wilbur, Scale 60 feet = 1 in., November 8, 1902, December 16, 1902, A. L. Eliot, Surveyor, Boston, Mass." 
reserving unto themselves and the Town of Wilmington for roadway and roadway sloping purposes the follow- 
ing described area: 



117 



(Special Town Meeting continued) 



Northwesterly by Aldrich Road, 160.71 feet; northeasterly by lot 170, 20 feet; southeasterly 
through lots 162-169 inclusive 161 feet; southwesterly by lot 161, 20 feet; containing 3,220 square feet, 
subject to such terms and condition as the Selectmen may determine, and further to set the minimum amount 
to be paid for such conveyance; or do anything in relation thereto. (By Petition) 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to authorize the Selectmen to sell and convey to James M. Gillis 
a certain parcel of Town-owned land shown as parcels 34-38 on Assessors' Map 31, bound and described as 
follows ; 

Easterly by Grand Street, 160 feet; northerly by Apple Road, 200 feet; westerly by lots 415 and 
436, 160 feet; southerly by Birch Road, 200 feet; containing 32,000 square feet being lots 416 through 
435 inclusive, all as shown on a plan entitled "Fairview Park, Wilmington, Mass., June 1914, C.A. Thayer, j 
Engineer, Scale 1 in = 80 feet subject to such terms and conditions as the Selectmen may determine and 
further to set the minimum amount to be paid for such conveyance; or do anything in relation thereto. 
(By Petition) 

Hereof fail not and make due return of this Warrant, or a certified copy thereof, with your doings thereon 
to the Town Clerk, as soon as may be and before said meeting. 

Given under our hands and seal of said Town this thirtieth day of November A.D. 1978. 



Selectmen of the Town of Wilmington 
s/Aldo A. Caira 
s /James F. Banda 
s/Robert J. Cain 
s/A. John Imbimbo 

Attest: s/Rocco V. DePasquale 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING - DECEMBER 18, 1978 - BARROWS AUDITORIUM 



The Moderator, Mr. John M. Callan, called the meeting to order at 7:45 P.M. there being a quorum present. 
The Moderator, read the Special Town Meeting Warrant until he was interrupted by Mr. Sterling Morris who 
moved that further reading be dispensed with and each article be taken separately. So voted. 

A motion by Paul J. Bova, "I move that we advance to Article 2 for consideration at this time. Motion 
lost. 129 yes votes. 199 no votes. 

Permission was given by the Moderator to discuss the first two articles as a unit, both depending upon 
each other. Motion to above Article 1, motion by Paul J. Bova, "I move that the Town vote to transfer 
Town-owned land acquired for the construction of a public school or schools to the care, custody, manage- 
ment and control of the Board of Selectmen, said land to be used for open space and recreational purposes. 
2/3 vote required. Motion lost. Yes votes 54. No votes 328. Finance Committee recommendation was no. 

ARTICLE 2. Motion was made by Paul J. Bova to pass over article 2. Motion seconded. Vote to pass over 
article 2 was unanimous, and was so declared by Moderator. Finance Committee recommended no. 

ARTICLE 3. Motion to Article 3 was proposed by James R. Miceli. "I move that the Town vote to authorize 
the Selectmen to sell and convey to Harrison H. Fogg and JoAnn Fogg a certain parcel of Town-owned land 
shown as parcel 37 on Assessors' Map 33, bound and described as follows: 

Southerly by Houghton Road 125 feet; westerly by lot 42 180 feet; northerly by lots 10-14, 
125 feet; easterly by lot 36 180 feet; containing 22,500 square feet being Block G lots 37 - 41 inclusive, 
all as shown on plan entitled: Ye Pine Woods, Plan showing subdivision of House lots formerly owned by 
Ed. Blanchard in Wilmington, Mass. Scale 1 in. = 100 feet June 1928 Dana F. Perkins, Civil Engineer and 
Surveyor, Reading, Mass., subject to such terms and conditions as the Selectmen may determine and further 
to set the minimum amount of $8,000.00 to be paid for such conveyance. Finance Committee recommends 
approval. 2/3 vote required. So voted. Moderator declared the vote unanimous. 



118 



(Special Town Meeting continued) 



ARTICLE 4. Motion made by James R. Miceli, same as the article, with minimum amount of $10,000.00 to 
be paid for such conveyance. Finance Committee recommends approval. Motion was seconded and so voted. 
Vote was unanimous, Moderator so stated. 2/3 vote required. 

ARTICLE 5. Motion was made by James R. Miceli, same as the article with minimum amount of $9,000.00 to 
be paid for such conveyance. Finance Committee recommends approval. 2/3 vote required. Motion seconded 
and so voted unanimously. 

The Moderator declared there being no further business to come before the meeting that said meeting be 
adjourned. 

Meeting adjourned at 8:45 P.M. There were 443 voters in attendance with approximately 10 non-voters. 
Articles voted by taxation. None. 

Attest: (Mrs.) Priscilla R. Ward 

Town Clerk 
Wilmington, Mass. 




Special Town Meeting - December 18, 1978 
119 



Town Accountant 



ANALYSIS OF CASH ACCOUNT 
July 1, 1977 to June 30, 1978 



Balance as of July 1, 1977 

Add: Cash Receipts 7/1/77 to 6/30/78 

Deduct: Cash Expenditures 7/1/77 to 6/30/78 
Balance on Hand 6/30/78 



Tax Collections: 

Personal Property, Levy 

Real Estate, Levy 

Betterments Added to Taxes: 
Water Assessments, Levy 



Street Assessments, Levy 
Sewer Assessments, Levy 
Water Liens Added to Taxes: 
Levy 



1977 
1978 
1975 
1976 
1977 
1978 

1976 
1977 
1978 
1978 
1978 

1976 
1977 
1978 

Sewer Liens Added to Taxes: 

Levy 1978 
Tax Titles & Possessions: 

Tax Titles 

Tax Possessions 
Pro-Forms Taxes 
Assessments Paid in Advance: 

Water 

Street 

Unapportioned Street Assessments 



ANALYSIS OF CASH RECEIVED 

2,949.09 
396,550.00 
.01 

96,552.20 
187,140.57 
10,638,978.39 

370.16 
1,653.21 
11,712.69 



1,460.22 
2,048.90 
24,848.61 



12,357.47 
10,100.00 



3,484.12 
6,055.86 



Paid in Full 



Short Term Loans: 



Temporary Loans, Antic, of Revenue 
, Antic, of Reimb. 
, Antic, of Bond Issues 

Long Term Loans: 
Sewer Loan 



AMOUNTS BORROWED 

2,000,000.00 
78,750.00 
242,000.00 



399,499.09 



10,922,671.17 



13,736.06 
10,936.85 
5,931.76 



28,357.73 
290.37 



22,457.47 
183.35 



9,539.98 
3,663.17 



2,320,750.00 
1,865,000.00 



2,197,463.17 
37,161,398.15 
39,358,861.32 
37,035,941.60 

2,322,919.72 



11,417,267.00 



4,185,750.00 




GRANTS AND GIFTS 



Federal Aid: 
Schools: 

Federal Employment Act //PL874 

National Defense Education #PL85-864 

Reading Skills 

E.S.E.A. Title IVB 

Handicapped Children §1 

Special Projects, Title I 

Head Start 
Sewer Project, GR//C25034201 
Title II Antirecession Fiscal Funds 
Snow Blizzard "78" Reimbursement 
Town Forest Reimbursement 
P ublic Grants: 
State Aid to Highways 
County Aid to Highways 
State Aid to Public Libraries 
C.E.T.A. Funds 



8,427.59 
20,898.96 
85,533.00 
30,630.48 
32,040.00 
10,000.00 
28,494.00 



216,024.03 
974,000.00 
102,423.66 
15,009.00 
25,000.00 

46,767.53 
23,383.77 
6,621.00 
21,126.14 




1,332,456.69 



97,898.44 



REVOLVING FUNDS 



School Lunch Program: 

State Reimbursements 

Program Receipts 
High School Athletic Association 
Recreation Dedicated Accounts 
Outside Detail Account 
Tax Title Recordings 



161,501.23 
224,440.61 



385,941.84 
4,796.20 
13,768.60 
42,841.69 
219.80 



447,568.13 



Water Guaranteed Deposits 

Water Department: 
Water Rates 
Water Services 
Water Installations 
Industrial Fire Protection Rates 
Industrial Way Pumping Station 
Water Available Surplus 
Sewer Use (Septage Disposal) 
Accrued Int. Antirecession Funds 

Sale of Cemetery Lots 

Veterans' Aid Reimbursements 

Memorial Library Funds 

Carter Lecture Fund, Reimbursements 

Perpetual Care Funds 

Legal Settlement Reimbursements 

Blue Cross/Blue Shield Dividend 

Premium Sale of Bonds 

Accrued Interest Sale of Bonds 

County Tax Assessment, Refund 

Appropriation Refunds 

Surplus Revenue 

Tailings 



Short Term Investments 
Employees Deductions: 

Federal Withholding 

State Withholding 

Retirement System, Town 

Teachers 

Blue Cross/Blue Shield 

Group Insurance 



RESTRICTED RECEIPTS 



501,294.24 
1,965.16 
706.23 
9,976.96 
10,905.75 



AGENCY & TRUST FUNDS 



167,658.98 
279,518.03 



7,452.00 



524,848.34 
41.54 
20,000.00 
4,488.65 
9,852.00 
3,319.57 
42.25 
518.89 
9,200.00 
82,387.79 
190.00 
6,508.85 
10,102.08 
835.12 
48,279.46 
518.26 
1,636.13 



1,395,855.71 
432,265.69 

447,177.01 
166,023.57 
2,984.56 



730,220.93 
12,381,000.00 



121 



Employees Deductions: (cont.) 

Washington National Insurance 

Tax Sheltered Annuities 

Credit Union 

Union Dues 

U. S. Savings Bonds 
Fish & Game Licenses for Commonwealth 
County Dog Licenses 
Lunch Food Tax, State 



AGENCY & TRUST FUNDS 
(continued) 



6,419.84 
61,359.79 
677,644.64 
52,480.37 
17,681.25 
6,363.75 
4,845.95 
896.65 



3,271,998.78 



ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 



Schools, State Reimbursements 

Real Estate Abatements, Veterans, State 

Blind, State 
Widows, State 

Loss of Taxes, State 

Lottery Funds, State 

Highway Funds Chapter 497071 State 

Local Aid Distribution, State 

Veterans Benefits, State 

Conservation Reimbursements, State 

Motor Vehicle Excise Collections: 

Prior Levies 

Current Levy 
Farm Animal Excise, 1978 
Ambulance Account 
Sewer Rates 
Liquor Licenses 
Interests & Costs: 

Short Term Investments 

Tax Collections 

Water Demands 

General Fund Investments 

Tax Title Interests & Costs 

Sewer Bonds Interest 
Municipal Receipts: 

Selectmen 

Tax Collector 

Town Clerk 

Planning Board 

Rents 

N. E. Tel. & Tel. Commissions 
Police Department 
Building Inspector: 

Building Permits 

Wire Permits 

Plumbing Permits 

Gas Permits 

Certification Fees 
Sealer of Weights & Measures 
Engineering Department 
Highway Department: 

Sale of Obsolete Equipment 
Cemetery Department 
Drainlayer Permits 
Sewer Permits 
Health & Sanitation: 

Board of Health 

Public Nurse 



1,902,392.72 
10,286.00 
787.50 
9,800.00 
888.03 
41,027.52 
80,057.80 
96,315.75 
6,178.09 
24,917.91 

389,595.75 
391,221.89 



62,688.42 
48,620.03 

4,600.17 
44,440.63 

2,262.29 
12,073.96 

471.00 
3,394.00 
5,798.15 
6,317.17 
1,139.00 

339.55 



29,200.80 
4,607.00 
1,100.50 
951.00 
375.00 



3,907.00 
487.50 



2,172,651.32 



780,817.64 
183.25 
4,844.25 
67,193.46 
7,000.00 



174,685.50 



17,458.87 
4,698.00 



36,234.30 

663.00 
515.00 



2,174.00 
11,072.00 
200.00 
50.00 



122 



ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 
(continued) 

iealth & Sanitation: (cont.) 
Sale of Dogs 217.00 
Dog License Reimbursements 2,608.00 
Division of Standards, Licenses 48.00 

Library Receipts 

lonservation Commission 

Fourth District Court Fines 4,526.75 
Lowell District Court Fines 100.00 
Insurance & Workmens Comp. Reimbursements 

TOTAL RECEIPTS FOR PERIOD JULY 1, 1977 to JUNE 30, 1978 



7,267.50 
1,311.06 
50.00 

4,626.75 
3,542.28 



3,297,238.18 
$37,161,398.15 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON 
DETAIL OF REVENUE SHARING 
JULY 1, 1977 to JUNE 30, 1978 



Balance on hand July 1, 1977 
Received 7/1/77 through 6/30/78 



Federal Grants 



$501,760.00 



Interest Received 
On Investments 



$9,165.16 



Expended 



$461,180.00 



Balance 
On Hand 

$7,731.42 



Balance on hand June 30, 1978 



$57,476.58 



Expenditures: 

Police Salaries 
Fire Salaries 



$230,590.00 
230,590.00 
$461,180.00 



"I certify that this is a true extract 
of the Revenue Sharing Funds of the 
Town of Wilmington, Mass." 



Robert H. Peters 
Town Accountant 



123 



DISBURSEMENTS FROM GENERAL ACCOUNTS 
ANALYSIS OF EXPENDITURES OTHER THAN THAT RAISED FROM 
APPROPRIATION FOR THE PERIOD 7/1/77 - 6/30/78 



Refunds : 

Personal Property Taxes 

Real Estate Taxes 

Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes 

Tax Title Recording Fees 

Ambulance Account 

Estimated Receipts 

Surplus Revenue 
Water Department: 

Rates 

Services 

Liens, 1978 

Water Guaranteed Deposits 
Assessments - State & County: 
State Recreation 
M.D.C. Sewer 

Motor Vehicle Excise Bills 
Air Pollution Control 
Area Planning Council 
M.B.T.A. 

Ipswich River Watershed District 

County Tax 

County Retirement 
Legal Settlements 
Outside Details: 

Police 

Maintenance 

Miscellaneous Departments 
Employee Deductions: 

Withholding Taxes, Federal 
State 

Retirement, Town Employees 

Teachers 
Group Insurance 

Washington National Insurance - Teachers 
U. S. Savings Bonds 

Blue Cross/Blue Shield - Town Employees 

Teachers 

Tax Sheltered Annuities - Teachers 

Credit Union 

Court Ordered Deductions 
Union Dues: 

Town Employees 

Police Department 

Fire Department 

Maintenance Department 

Teachers 
Agency Accounts: 

County Dog Licenses 

State Fish & Game Licenses 

Lunch Food Tax 

Recreation, Dedicated Accounts 
Federal Grants and Aid - School: 
Public Law 874 
Public Law 865 
Head Start 

Title I, Reading Skills 

Services for Handicapped Children 

Title VI 

Title IV, E.S.E.A. 



280.74 
10.00 
88.69 
1,226.43 

75,923.87 
75,485.94 
1,930.05 
1,310.10 
2,524.81 
226,681.95 

7.54 

543,340.79 
305,802.00 



2,960.00 
3,421.48 
2,371.50 
4,144.00 
39,583.39 



40.86 
77,150.51 
11,512.20 
214.80 
39.00 
501.81 
22.00 



1,605.86 



383,864.26 
849,142.79 



32,671.18 
9,864.13 
444.75 

1,395,855.71 
432,265.69 
165,851.47 
274,639.95 
2,913.85 
6,490.67 
17,681.25 
105,031.18 
60,292.48 
55,648.29 
677,644.64 
84.91 



52,480.37 

5,339.25 
6,363.75 
928.25 
11,430.62 

68,505.81 
27,449.00 
13,832.00 
84,357.84 
29,744.96 
34,273.23 
19,926.62 



91,087.04 



1,233,007.05 
97,000.00 



42,980.06 



3,246,880.46 



24,061.87 



278,089.46 



124 



DISBURSEMENTS FROM GENERAL ACCOUNTS 



Library Memorial Account 
Law Collection Devel., Library 
Inter-Library Loan Improv. 
C.E.T.A Revolving Funds 
Tailings Account 
Water Department: 
Maintenance & Operation 
Water Mains 

General Well Field Account 

Silver Lake Sewer Construction 

School Lunch Program 

High School Athletic Association 

Carter Lecture Fund 

Cemetery Trust Funds 

Glen Acres Trust 

Authentication Fees 

Temporary Loans: 

Anticipation of Reimbursement 
Anticipation of Taxes 
Anticipat ion of Bond Issue 

Short Term Investments 



78,750.00 
2,000,000.00 
100,000.00 



42.25 
695.13 
1,502.96 
6,463.71 
532.87 

391,091.54 
1,833.75 
20,207.40 
1,833,141.66 
426,077.95 
3,125.03 
456.79 
9,200.00 
20,370.15 
6,508.85 



2,178,750.00 
13,381,000.00 



Total Expenditures from General Accounts 



23,294,105.98 



ANALYSIS OF THE ESTIMATED RECEIPTS 
USED BY THE ASSESSORS IN SETTING THE 1978 TAX RATE 
WITH THE ACTUAL 1977 RECEIPTS 



Used by the 
Assessors in 
Setting 1978 
Tax Rate 



Actual 
Receipts 
1977 



More 
Than 
Estimated 



Less 
Than 
Estimated 



Motor Vehicles & Trailer Excise 


552,146 


56 


651,486 


00 


Licenses 


7,000 


00 


8,000 


00 


Fines 


3,450 


89 


4,264 


00 


Special Assessments 


30,784 


60 


25,301 


00 


General Government 


12,090 


63 


11,909 


00 


Protection of Persons & Property 


19,692 


75 


39,664 


00 


Health & Sanitation 


4,094 


75 


3,135 


00 


Highways 


754 


50 


910 


00 


Libraries, Local Receipts 


741 


50 


896 


00 


Cemeteries (Other than Trust Funds & Sale of Lots) 


9,775 


00 


10,112 


00 


Interest 


111,731 


22 


121,456 


00 


Farm Animal Excise 


272 


00 


153 


00 


Ambulance Service 


4,291 


60 


4,847 


00 


Sewer Revenue 


78,503. 


19 


72,228 


00 


Dog License Reimbursements 


3,259 


92 


3,061 


00 


Miscellaneous Receipts 


2,156 


33 


6,326 


00 


840,745 


44 


963,748 


00 



99,339.44 
1,000.00 
813.11 



19,971.25 

155.50 
154.50 
337.00 
9,724.78 

555.40 



4,169.67 
136,220.65 



5,483.60 
181.63 

959.75 



119.00 

6,275.19 
198.92 

13,218.09 



125 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
BALANCE SHEET - JUNE 30, 1978 



Cash 

Short Terra Investments 
Petty Cash Advances 
Taxes Uncollected: 
Prior Levies 



2,322,919.72 
1,000,000.00 
625.00 



3,323,544.72 



Personal Property 


1972 


15 


60 




1973 


135 


70 




1974 


32 


45 




1975 


62 


15 




1976 


1,267 


20 




1977 


1,358 


4 8 


Real Estate Taxes 


1973 


175 


90 




1974 


75 


14 




1977 


64,576 


33 


Current Levies 








Personal Property 


1978 


7,027 


06 


Real Estate Taxes 


1978 


351,705 


87 



Tax Deferral & Recovery, Levy 1978 R.E. 
Personal Property Taxes in Litigation, Levy 1969 
Motor Vehicle Excise Taxes: 
Prior Levies 
Levy 1971 

1972 

1973 

1974 

1975 

1976 

1977 

Current Levy 1978 
Farm Animal Excise Tax 1978 
Tax Titles & Possessions: 

Tax Titles 

Tax Possessions 
Assessments Added to Taxes: 



Street Assessments 1975 
1976 
1977 
1978 

Water Assessments 1977 
1978 

Sewer Assessments 1978 
Betterments in Litigation 
Street Assessments 1972 
1973 

Unapportioned Assessments 
Water 
Sewer 

Accounts Receivables: 
Water Department: 
Rates 
Services 

Commercial & Industrial Fire Protection Rates 
Industrial Way Pumping Station 
Water Liens 1976 

1977 

1978 

Sewer Rates 
State Aid to Highways 
County Aid to Highways 
Ambulance Account 
Veterans Benefits 
Unprovided for Accounts: 
Overlay Deficits: 
Levy 1975 

1976 

1977 

1978 

Legal Settlements 
Snow & Ice Removal, Overdrafts 
Highways Funds, Chp. 356 Acts of 1977 
Anti-Recession Fiscal Assistance 
Underestimates - Assessments 

County Hospital 1977 

County Tax 1978 

State Recreation Assessment 1978 

M.D.C. Sewer Assessment 1978 

Metropolitan Air Pollution Control 1978 
Loans Authorized 
Revenue, 1979 

TOTAL ASSETS 



11.55 
2,394.09 
11,763.94 
5,329.52 
17,933.66 
36,415.63 
83,042.76 



95.96 
93.76 
772.80 
811.82 
519.71 
2,259.80 



85.61 
98.20 



47.94 
927.00 
3,009.97 



42.37 
2,173.94 
6,481.48 
372,365.78 



12,634.36 
103,695.34 
2,765.10 
5,430.61 
59.75 



2,871.58 



358,732.93 
1,628.00 
462.00 



156,891.15 
104,353.59 



97,655.59 
81,661.96 



2,779.51 
6,377.95 



700.86 
30,374.97 



56,667.67 
2,670.97 
144.00 
2,321.48 



3,984.91 

4,419.41 
99,904.28 

3,071.41 
11,228.15 

8,995.59 



381,063.57 
14,612.21 
48,790.29 
43,232.00 
27,128.97 



124,585.16 



261,244.74 
119.50 



179,317.55 



31,075.83 



193,407.87 



639,412.20 
7,982,000.00 
13,983,566.00 

$ 27,033,325.90 



TOWN OF WILMINGTON, MASSACHUSETTS 
BALANCE SHEET - JUNE 30, 1978 



LIABILITIES & RESERVES 



Temporary Loans, Anticipation, Bond Issue 

1975 Real Estate Taxes, Overpaid 

1976 Real Estate Taxes, Overpaid 

1975 Water Liens, Overpaid 

1976 Water Assessments, Overpaid 
Tax Title Recording Fees 
Employee Payroll Deductions: 

Retirement System 
Teachers Retirement 
Group Insurance 

Washington National Insurance Co., Teachers 
Blue Cross/Blue Shield: Town 

Teachers 

Tax Sheltered Annuities 
Agency Accounts: 

County Dog Licenses 

State Food Tax 
Revolving Accounts: 

Recreation Deducted Account 

School Lunch Program 

High School Athletic Account 
Federal Grants & Aids: 

E.S.E.A. Title II 

Learning Resources, Title IV 

Education, Handicapped Children, Title VI 

E.S.E.A. Title IV-B, PL 93-380 

World of Construction Title II 

Public Law #874 

Public Law #85-864 

Head Start 

Title VI-B Special Workshops 
CETA Funds 

Law Collection Development Project (Library) 
Inter-Library Loan Improv. Grant (Library) 

State Aid to Public Libraries 

Water Guaranteed Deposits 

Tailings 

Glen Pines Trust 

Corum Meadows Trust 

Accrued Interest, Sale of Bonds 

Group Insurance Dividend 

Overestimates, State & County Assessments: 

County Hospital Assessment, 1978 

County Tax Assessment, 1977 

Mass. Bay Transit Authority, 1978 

Ipswich River Watershed District, 1978 
Sewer Use Control 
Sale of Cemetery Lots Fund 
Revenue Reserved Until Collected: 

Farm Animal Excise 

Motor Vehicle Excise 

Special Assessments 

Tax Titles & Possessions 

Departmental Revenue 

Water Revenue 

Sewer Revenue 

State & County Aid to Highways Revenue 
Reserve for Petty Cash Advances 



14,752 


41 


54,567 


37 


435 


71 


1,436 


17 


7,623 


39 


13,582 


82 


12,578 


06 


1,327 


10 


63 


34 


3,436 


67 


41,444 


12 


12,924 


85 



92.18 
1,063.85 
2,295.04 
10,710.69 
29.79 
43,676.17 
127,282.63 
14,662.00 
5,126.00 
108.51 
4.87 
297.04 



5,896.03 
5,023.92 
1,318.05 
37.37 



119.50 
261,244.74 
42,006.63 
179,317.55 
20,223.74 
65,674.63 
4,419.41 
98,547.77 
625.00 



242,000.00 
302.34 
67.86 
114.40 
1.00 
5.00 



104,975.93 
1,390.44 

57,805.64 



205,348.77 
6,621.00 
865.08 
5,247.55 
16,210.74 
8,026.88 
10,102.08 
190.00 



12,275.37 
5,832.00 
9,852.80 



672,178.97 



127 



LIABILITIES & RESERVES 



Appropriation Balances: 



Board of Registrars 


55.00 


Town Accountant 


130.00 


Town Treasurer 


152.30 


Town Collector 


189.10 


Town Clerk 


55.43 


Town Hall 


2,465.40 


Planning Board 


7,042.65 


Police Department 


570.00 


Fire Department 


414.13 


Civil Defense 


4,557.04 


Building Inspector 


168.00 


Town Engineer 


384.03 


Highway Department 


1,003.33 


Sidewalks 


58,286.69 


Chapter 90 Construction 1969 


11,418.34 


1971 


637.23 


1976 


37,232.00 


1977 


37,232.00 


1978 


40,000.00 


Chapter 90 Maintenance 1978 


16,545.57 


Chapter 81 Maintenance 1978 


28,333.15 


Snow & Ice Control, Outlay 


4,773.00 


Public Street Lights 


82,249.11 


Park Department 


170.00 


School Department 


264,776.99 


School Maintenance 


16,697.37 


Library 


697.15 


Beautif ication Committee 


2,453.98 


Historical Commission 


5,073.41 


Sewer Maintenance 


6,676.75 


Blue Cross & Insurance 


26,970.20 


Appraisals 


17,886.85 


1978 Salary Adjustments & Additional Costs 


35,000.00 


Land Acquisition for Sanitary Purposes 


5,550.00 


Unemployment Payments 


5,000.00 


Drainage, North Street 


50.00 


Forest Street 


5,108.87 


Vehicle Passage over B&M RR 


250.00 


Microfilming 


1,861.40 


Cook Hill 


15,000.00 


Plans, Recreational or Athletic 


6,365.00 


Glen Road Sidewalks 


45,460.77 


Non-Revenue Accounts: 




Woburn Street School 


3,339.19 


Woburn Street School Addition 


9,156.61 


Shawsheen Avenue School 


43,938.14 


West Intermediate School 


9,747.22 


Wilmington Memorial Library 


40,410.41 


Shawsheen Avenue Bridge 


3,000.00 


Sewer Construction 


964,751.85 


Water Betterment, Oakwood Road 


4,952.75 


General Well Field Account 


45,008.83 


Plans Improvement to System 


6,094.09 


Water Distribution System N.E. Sector of Town 


259,755.54 


Main Street Well Field 


2,449.89 


Street Betterments, Ferguson Road 


4,876.68 


Lexington Street 


10,422.87 


Morningside Drive 


4,395.87 


Grove Avenue 


9,054.01 


Esquire Estate Completion 


2,721.28 



128 



LIABILITIES & RESERVES 



Wilmington Redevelopment Authority 

Town Forest 

Water Treatment Plant 
Loans Authorized & Unissued 
Appropriation Control, 1979 
Water Available Surplus 
Surplus Revenue 



17,746.12 
105,720.00 
242,000.00 



1,789,541.35 
7,740,000.00 
14,528,047.00 
175,566.24 
645,815.22 



TOTAL LIABILITIES & RESERVES 



$27,033,325.90 



TRUST FUND ACCOUNTS 6/30/78 



Cemetery Trust Funds 
Andover Savings Bank 
Reading Co-Operative Bank 
Reading Savings Bank 

S.D.J. Carter Lecture Fund 

Reading Savings Bank 

Woburn Five Cent Savings Bank 

Burnap Library Fund 
Andover Savings Bank 

Benjamin Buck Library Fund 
Andover Savings Bank 

Charlotte C. Smith Library Fund 
Reading Savings Bank 

Sears Cook Walker-Walker 

School Fund 

Reading Savings Bank 

Chester M. Clark Library Fund 
Reading Savings Bank 

Sabra Carter Common Fund 
Andover Savings Bank 

East Wilmington Improvement 
Association Library Fund 
Reading Savings Bank 



Balances 
6/30/77 



2,573.64 
38,029.64 
30, 6%. 90 



5,228.03 
2,483.70 



331.74 



829.93 



1,007.49 



342.74 



1,018.85 



303.93 



7,611.38 
90,457.97 



Withdrawn 
1977/1978 



205.00 
10,000.00 

518.89 



312.85 



507.49 



518.85 



3,320.81 
15,383.89 



Interest 
Added 



957.48 
3,355.68 
2,087.81 



382.82 
861.31 



82.02 



223.08 



64.65 



18.70 



65.26 



81.40 



490.41 
8,670.62 



Trusts 
Added 



9,200.00 



Balances 
6/30/78 



3,326.12 
50,585.32 
22,784.71 



5,091.96 
3,345.01 



413.76 



740.16 



564.65 



361.44 



565.26 



385.33 



Principal 
Held In 
Trust 



2,175.00 
44,275.00 
20,400.00 



4,578.50 
2,000.00 



200.00 



500.00 



500.00 



257.00 



500.00 



200.00 



4,780.98 3,820.00 

9,200.00 92,944.70 79,405.50 



Conservation Commission 
Reading Savings Bank 



2,173.09 



118.78 



2,291.87 



1,497.40 



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136 



ANALYSIS OF THE MATURING DEBT 



INSIDE THE DEBT LIMIT 

Wilmington Memorial Library 

G/L 44, Sec. 10 $485,000 
Land Acq. Town Forest (1975) 

G/L 44, Sec. 10 $169,000 
Sewer Main Bonds (1971) 

G/L 44, Sec. 10 $275,000 
Sewer Main Bonds (1973) 

G/L 44, Sec. 10 $264,000 
Urban Renewal Bonds (1971) 

G/L 212B Sec. 20 $200,000 
Acquire Land School Purposes (1972) 

G/L 44, Sec. 10 $61,800 
Stree Construction Bonds (1974/75) 

G/L 44, Sec. 10 $68,210 
Sewerage System & Treatment Facility 

G/L 44, Sec. 7 $1,865,000 



Balances 
7/1/77 



260,000 
145,000 
185,000 
200,000 
100,000 
12,360 
40,926 



Added 
1978 



1,865,000 



943,286 1,865,000 



Paid-Off 
1978 



25,000 
20,000 
15,000 
15,000 
20,000 
12,360 
13,642 

121,002 



Balances 
6/30/78 



235,000 
125,000 
170,000 
185,000 
80,000 

-0- 
27,284 
1,865,000 
2,687,284 



OUTSIDE THE DEBT LIMIT 

Add. & Alter, Jr. /Sr. High School 

Acts 645/48, $400,000 
Glen Road School 

Acts 645/48, $450,000 
Boutwell Street School 

Acts 645/48, $400,000 
North Intermediate School 

Acts 645/48, $1,050,000 
Woburn Street School 

Acts 645/48, $597,000 
Woburn Street School Addition 

Acts 645/48, $660,000 
West Intermediate School 

Acts 645/48, $1,445,000 
Shawsheen Avenue School 

Acts 645/48, $1,674,720 
Shawsheen Ave. School (2nd Issue) 

Acts 645/48, $100,000 
Water Main Bonds (1962) 

Chp. 44, Sec. 8, $86,000 
Water Main Bonds, New Well Field 

Chp. 44, Sec. 8, $463,529 
Salem Street Well Field & Mains 

Chp. 44, Sec. 8, $320,000 
Water Main Bonds (1974/75) 

Chp. 44, Sec. 8, $11,940 
Improv. System N.E. Sector Town 

Chp. 44, Sec. 8, $550,000 



COMBINED TOTALS 



20,000 
20,000 
60,000 
220,000 
202,000 
310,000 
555,000 
770,000 
40,000 
5,000 
120,000 
160,000 
7,164 
430,000 



2,919,164 -0- 
3,862,450 1,865,000 



20,000 
20,000 
20,000 
55,000 
30,000 
35,000 
70,000 
110,000 
5,000 
5,000 
30,000 
20,000 
2,388 
35,000 
457,388 
578,390 



-0- 
-0- 

40,000 
165,000 
172,000 
275,000 
485,000 
660,000 
35,000 
-0- 
90,000 
140,000 
4,776 
395,000 
2,461,776 
5,149,060 



137 



NORTHEAST 

LIBRARY BkNDkNG CO. INC 

NOV 1979 

MEDFORD, MASS. 



For Reference 

Not to be taken from this room